Evaluating Sources Quiz Questions And Answers

10 Questions | Total Attempts: 8526

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Evaluating Sources Quiz Questions And Answers - Quiz

Do you have a good understanding of evaluating sources? You can take this evaluating sources quiz questions and answers and test your knowledge. Evaluating sources is defined as doing research work on a difficult or complex task in which credibility depends upon the reliability of the information. The sources or medium through which we get information. This is a quick and simple quiz to check declarative knowledge of sources in research. So, let's try out the quiz. All the best!


Questions and Answers
  • 1. 
    You have a copy of a speech given by important person X, who was a key player in the history you are examining. It is a:
    • A. 

      Valid source

    • B. 

      Invalid Source

    • C. 

      Reliable source

    • D. 

      Primary source

    • E. 

      Secondary source

  • 2. 
    If several pieces of evidence lead you to the same conclusion, they may be said to ___________ each other.
    • A. 

      Corroborate

    • B. 

      Collaborate

    • C. 

      Rely upon

    • D. 

      Validate

    • E. 

      Approximate

  • 3. 
     _________ refers to who produced your document or where it came from.
    • A. 

      Validity

    • B. 

      Reliability

    • C. 

      Proximity

    • D. 

      Bias

    • E. 

      Ethos

  • 4. 
    ________ refers to the perspective or possible agenda of the document or witness. It may or may not affect validity.
    • A. 

      Proximity

    • B. 

      Validty

    • C. 

      Reliability

    • D. 

      Pathos

    • E. 

      Bias

  • 5. 
    History Professor X has written a very detailed and interesting book about Japanese Imperialism that was published in 2005.
    • A. 

      It is a primary source.

    • B. 

      It is a reliable source.

    • C. 

      It is a secondary source.

    • D. 

      It has high proximity.

    • E. 

      It is not biased.

  • 6. 
    What is the difference between a scholarly article & a popular article?
    • A. 

      A scholarly article is written for a scholarly audience, while a popular article is typically written for the general public or a non-specialist audience.

    • B. 

      A scholarly article is one assigned by a course instructor, while a popular article is one recommended by your peers.

    • C. 

      No difference. They're the same thing!

    • D. 

      A scholarly article is at least 5000 words long, while a popular article is typically 140 characters or less.

    • E. 

      None of the above

  • 7. 
    Which of the following is NOT a common criterion for evaluating a source for inclusion in a course paper or bibliography?
    • A. 

      Currency

    • B. 

      Fun

    • C. 

      Authority

    • D. 

      Perspective or bias

    • E. 

      All of the above

  • 8. 
    Based solely on the domain name, which of the following websites is most likely to contain authoritative government information?
    • A. 

      Http://reputableinformation.edu

    • B. 

      Http://reputableinformation.com

    • C. 

      Http://reputableinformation.org

    • D. 

      Http://reputableinformation.gov

    • E. 

      Http://reputableinformation.net

  • 9. 
    When determining if a site is reliable, one should look for an author listed.
    • A. 

      True 

    • B. 

      False 

  • 10. 
    Another strategy to determine the reliability of a website is to look for a date of publication or a date when the information was lasted updated
    • A. 

      True 

    • B. 

      False 

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