Evaluating Sources Quiz Questions And Answers

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Evaluating Sources Quiz Questions And Answers - Quiz

Do you have a good understanding of evaluating sources? You can take this evaluating sources quiz questions and answers and test your knowledge. Evaluating sources is defined as doing research work on a difficult or complex task in which credibility depends upon the reliability of the information. The sources or medium through which we get information. This is a quick and simple quiz to check declarative knowledge of sources in research. So, let's try out the quiz. All the best!


Questions and Answers
  • 1. 

    You have a copy of a speech given by important person X, who was a key player in the history you are examining. It is a:

    • A.

      Valid source

    • B.

      Invalid Source

    • C.

      Reliable source

    • D.

      Primary source

    • E.

      Secondary source

    Correct Answer
    D. Primary source
    Explanation
    A copy of a speech given by an important person X, who was a key player in the history being examined, would be considered a primary source. Primary sources are firsthand accounts or original documents from the time period being studied. In this case, the speech would provide direct insight into the thoughts, perspectives, and actions of the important person, making it a valuable primary source for understanding the historical context.

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  • 2. 

    If several pieces of evidence lead you to the same conclusion, they may be said to ___________ each other.

    • A.

      Corroborate

    • B.

      Collaborate

    • C.

      Rely upon

    • D.

      Validate

    • E.

      Approximate

    Correct Answer
    A. Corroborate
    Explanation
    When several pieces of evidence lead to the same conclusion, they support or strengthen each other. The word "corroborate" means to confirm or verify the truth or accuracy of something by providing additional evidence or support. Therefore, the evidence "corroborates" each other, reinforcing the conclusion that is drawn from it.

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  • 3. 

     _________ refers to who produced your document or where it came from.

    • A.

      Validity

    • B.

      Reliability

    • C.

      Proximity

    • D.

      Bias

    • E.

      Ethos

    Correct Answer
    B. Reliability
    Explanation
    Reliability refers to the consistency and dependability of a document's source. It indicates whether the information can be trusted and is based on credible and accurate sources. In this context, reliability is important because it ensures that the document is produced by a trustworthy and credible source, which adds credibility and validity to the information presented.

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  • 4. 

    ________ refers to the perspective or possible agenda of the document or witness. It may or may not affect validity.

    • A.

      Proximity

    • B.

      Validty

    • C.

      Reliability

    • D.

      Pathos

    • E.

      Bias

    Correct Answer
    E. Bias
    Explanation
    Bias refers to the perspective or possible agenda of the document or witness. It is an inclination or prejudice that may influence the information presented or the way it is interpreted. Bias can impact the validity of the information, as it may introduce a skewed or one-sided viewpoint. However, it does not necessarily determine the accuracy or reliability of the information, as bias can exist even in credible sources.

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  • 5. 

    History Professor X has written a very detailed and interesting book about Japanese Imperialism that was published in 2005.

    • A.

      It is a primary source.

    • B.

      It is a reliable source.

    • C.

      It is a secondary source.

    • D.

      It has high proximity.

    • E.

      It is not biased.

    Correct Answer
    C. It is a secondary source.
    Explanation
    The given book written by Professor X about Japanese Imperialism is classified as a secondary source. This is because it was published in 2005, which means it was created after the events it discusses took place. Secondary sources are typically based on primary sources and provide analysis, interpretation, or commentary on a topic. Therefore, the book is not a primary source, but it can still be considered reliable and informative for studying Japanese Imperialism. The answer does not mention bias or proximity, so we cannot determine those aspects based on the given information.

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  • 6. 

    What is the difference between a scholarly article & a popular article?

    • A.

      A scholarly article is written for a scholarly audience, while a popular article is typically written for the general public or a non-specialist audience.

    • B.

      A scholarly article is one assigned by a course instructor, while a popular article is one recommended by your peers.

    • C.

      No difference. They're the same thing!

    • D.

      A scholarly article is at least 5000 words long, while a popular article is typically 140 characters or less.

    • E.

      None of the above

    Correct Answer
    A. A scholarly article is written for a scholarly audience, while a popular article is typically written for the general public or a non-specialist audience.
    Explanation
    A scholarly article is written for a scholarly audience, while a popular article is typically written for the general public or a non-specialist audience. This means that scholarly articles are written with a higher level of complexity and depth, using specialized terminology and assuming a certain level of knowledge from the reader. On the other hand, popular articles are written in a more accessible and engaging manner, using simpler language and providing background information to cater to a wider audience.

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  • 7. 

    Which of the following is NOT a common criterion for evaluating a source for inclusion in a course paper or bibliography?

    • A.

      Currency

    • B.

      Fun

    • C.

      Authority

    • D.

      Perspective or bias

    • E.

      All of the above

    Correct Answer
    B. Fun
    Explanation
    The criterion "Fun" is not a common criterion for evaluating a source for inclusion in a course paper or bibliography. When evaluating sources, scholars typically consider factors such as currency, authority, and perspective or bias. However, the element of "fun" does not hold any relevance in determining the credibility or academic value of a source.

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  • 8. 

    Based solely on the domain name, which of the following websites is most likely to contain authoritative government information?

    • A.

      Http://reputableinformation.edu

    • B.

      Http://reputableinformation.com

    • C.

      Http://reputableinformation.org

    • D.

      Http://reputableinformation.gov

    • E.

      Http://reputableinformation.net

    Correct Answer
    A. Http://reputableinformation.edu
    Explanation
    The domain name ".edu" is commonly used by educational institutions, such as universities and colleges, which are often considered authoritative sources of information. Therefore, based solely on the domain name, the website http://reputableinformation.edu is most likely to contain authoritative government information.

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  • 9. 

    When determining if a site is reliable, one should look for an author listed.

    • A.

      True 

    • B.

      False 

    Correct Answer
    A. True 
    Explanation
    When determining if a site is reliable, it is important to look for an author listed. This is because knowing the author's credentials and expertise can help assess the credibility and trustworthiness of the information presented on the site. An author provides accountability and allows for further research on their qualifications, affiliations, and reputation. Without an author, it becomes difficult to verify the accuracy and reliability of the information, making it less trustworthy. Therefore, it is crucial to consider the presence of an author when evaluating the reliability of a website.

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  • 10. 

    Another strategy to determine the reliability of a website is to look for a date of publication or a date when the information was lasted updated

    • A.

      True 

    • B.

      False 

    Correct Answer
    A. True 
    Explanation
    This statement is true because the presence of a date of publication or last update on a website can help determine the reliability of the information provided. If the date is recent, it indicates that the website is regularly maintained and the information is likely to be current and accurate. On the other hand, if there is no date or the date is very old, it may suggest that the information is outdated and no longer reliable. Therefore, checking for a date of publication or last update is a useful strategy to assess the reliability of a website.

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