Commas With Coordinating Conjunctions: Quiz

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Commas With Coordinating Conjunctions: Quiz - Quiz

Do you know anything about commas with coordinating conjunctions? One prevalent type of comma mistake occurs while sorting out commas and conjunctions. A coordinating conjunction is a word that unites words or phrases of equal grammatical rank. It would be best to put a comma before the word but no comma before or after and or any other conjunction. Take this quiz and learn more about commas with coordinating conjunctions.


Questions and Answers
  • 1. 

    Which sentence is punctuated correctly?

    • A.

      I like to eat a lot but I have to watch my weight.

    • B.

      I like to eat a lot, but I have to watch my weight.

    • C.

      I like to eat a lot, I have to watch my weight.

    Correct Answer
    B. I like to eat a lot, but I have to watch my weight.
    Explanation
    When joining two sentences together, you need both a comma and a fanboy.

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  • 2. 

    Which sentence is punctuated correctly?

    • A.

      She went to the store and bought some bread.

    • B.

      She went to the store, and bought some bread.

    • C.

      She went to the store, bought some bread.

    Correct Answer
    A. She went to the store and bought some bread.
    Explanation
    Since you do not have a complete sentence on both sides of the fanboy, you do not need a comma.

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  • 3. 

    Which sentence is punctuated correctly?

    • A.

      I am a dancer yet I never have time to perform.

    • B.

      I am a dancer, yet I never have time to perform.

    • C.

      I am a dancer, I never have time to perform.

    Correct Answer
    B. I am a dancer, yet I never have time to perform.
    Explanation
    When joining two sentences together, you need both a comma and one of the fanboys.

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  • 4. 

    Which sentence is punctuated correctly?

    • A.

      I like fishing but I don't like eating fish.

    • B.

      I like fishing, but I don't like eating fish.

    • C.

      I like fishing, I don't like eating fish.

    Correct Answer
    B. I like fishing, but I don't like eating fish.
    Explanation
    When joining two sentences together, you need both a comma and one of the fanboys.

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  • 5. 

    Which sentence is punctuated correctly?

    • A.

      He gathered the leaves and got ready to jump in.

    • B.

      He gathered the leaves, and got ready to jump in.

    • C.

      He gathered the leaves, got ready to jump in.

    Correct Answer
    A. He gathered the leaves and got ready to jump in.
    Explanation
    Since you do not have a complete sentence on both sides of the fanboy, you do not need a comma.

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  • 6. 

    A run-on is a really long sentence.

    • A.

      True

    • B.

      False

    Correct Answer
    B. False
    Explanation
    A run-on sentence is not necessarily a really long sentence, although it can be. A run-on sentence is a grammatical error that occurs when two or more independent clauses are improperly joined together without appropriate punctuation or conjunctions. These clauses can be short or long. The key issue in a run-on sentence is that it lacks the necessary breaks or connections to make the sentence clear and properly structured.

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  • 7. 

    Which sentence is an example of a run-on? (remember a run-on is an ERROR--it is not correctly punctuated)

    • A.

      I like singing but I can't do it very well.

    • B.

      I like singing a ton of great songs even though I am not very good at it, but I hope to be good at it one day.

    • C.

      I like singing, I can't do it very well.

    Correct Answer
    A. I like singing but I can't do it very well.
    Explanation
    Remember a run-on is when you have a fanboy joining two sentences together, and you forgot your comma. Answer B is just a long sentence, but it is punctuated correctly.

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  • 8. 

    Which sentence is an example of a comma splice? 

    • A.

      Playing basketball is really fun and I hope to get more opportunities to play it.

    • B.

      Playing basketball is really fun, and I hope to get more opportunities to play it.

    • C.

      Playing basketball is really fun, I hope to get more opportunities to play it.

    Correct Answer
    C. Playing basketball is really fun, I hope to get more opportunities to play it.
    Explanation
    Remember a comma splice is when you have a comma joining two sentences together. This is an error because you need to have a fanboy as well. A comma alone is not strong enough to join two complete sentences together.

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  • 9. 

    Check which words listed below are coordinating conjunctions.

    • A.

      For

    • B.

      Be

    • C.

      And

    • D.

      Was

    • E.

      Am

    • F.

      Nor

    • G.

      But

    • H.

      I

    • I.

      Yet

    • J.

      Or

    • K.

      Some

    • L.

      So

    Correct Answer(s)
    A. For
    C. And
    F. Nor
    G. But
    I. Yet
    J. Or
    L. So
    Explanation
    The words "for," "and," "nor," "but," "yet," "or," and "so" are coordinating conjunctions. These words are used to connect words, phrases, or clauses of equal importance in a sentence. They can be used to join two independent clauses, join two words or phrases, or join two clauses within a larger sentence. The other words listed, such as "be," "was," "am," "I," and "some," are not coordinating conjunctions.

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  • Current Version
  • Oct 25, 2023
    Quiz Edited by
    ProProfs Editorial Team
  • Jun 27, 2011
    Quiz Created by
    Dsrt16
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