Cognition Process Science Trivia Facts Quiz

21 Questions | Total Attempts: 291

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Cognition Quizzes & Trivia

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Questions and Answers
  • 1. 
    1. Compared to detectors that haven’t fired recently, a detector that has fired recently is likely to:
    • A. 

      Be at a higher position within the network of detectors

    • B. 

      Have a higher response threshold

    • C. 

      Have a higher activation level

    • D. 

      Require more priming in order to fire

  • 2. 
    2. The term “introspection” refers to the:
    • A. 

      Process by which one individual seeks to infer the thoughts of another individual

    • B. 

      Procedure of examining thought processing by monitoring the brain’s electrical activity

    • C. 

      Process of each person looking within, to observe his or her own thoughts and ideas

    • D. 

      Technique of studying thought by interpreting the symbols used in communication

  • 3. 
    3. In order to summarize the Gestalt psychologists’ movement in a few words, one might say:
    • A. 

      “If you can’t see it happen, it isn’t worth studying.”

    • B. 

      “The perceptual whole is different than the sum of its parts.”

    • C. 

      “All that is important happens in the subconscious.”

    • D. 

      “What you see is what you get.”

  • 4. 
    4. In cognition, like other sciences, we first develop _____ and then _____ them.
    • A. 

      Tests; prove

    • B. 

      Theories; test

    • C. 

      Hypotheses; prove

    • D. 

      Hypotheses; test

  • 5. 
    5. An elderly woman has suffered a stroke in her left temporal lobe, and consequently can no longer name common nouns. This provides evidence that language is located in the left hemisphere for most people. What kind of evidence is this?
    • A. 

      introspection

    • B. 

      Unique population

    • C. 

      Neuroscience

    • D. 

      Behavioral

  • 6. 
    6. The hindbrain is responsible for which of the following?
    • A. 

      Rhythm of breathing, level of alertness, posture

    • B. 

      Complex thought, long-term memory

    • C. 

      Planned motor activity

    • D. 

      Perception and visual imagery

  • 7. 
    • A. 

      Blood vessels that carry blood to all areas of the brain

    • B. 

      Brain areas associated with various types of sensory information

    • C. 

      Pockets of oxygen found throughout the brain

    • D. 

      Thick bundles of fibers that allow communication between the brain’s hemispheres

  • 8. 
    8. A magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) or functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI):
    • A. 

      Is less useful than other types of neuroimaging for the study of the functioning of the brain

    • B. 

      Creates a three-dimensional representation of the brain’s tissue

    • C. 

      Is useful only for studying features on the outer surface of the brain

    • D. 

      Makes self-report data unnecessary

  • 9. 
    9. The auditory cortex follows the principle of contralateral control. Thus, the:
    • A. 

      Right temporal lobe receives most of its input from the left ear

    • B. 

      Right temporal lobe receives most of its input from the right ear

    • C. 

      Right temporal lobe receives equal input from both ears

    • D. 

      Information received by the right temporal lobe depends on whether the listener favors his or her right or left ear

  • 10. 
    10. A neuron is:
    • A. 

      A group of cells specialized for a particular type of information storage

    • B. 

      One of the fibers connecting the eye to the visual cortex

    • C. 

      An individual cell within the nervous system

    • D. 

      A region within the brain dedicated to a single function

  • 11. 
    11. The form of brain damage identified as prosopagnosia is primarily characterized by an inability to:
    • A. 

      Recognize faces

    • B. 

      Comprehend written text

    • C. 

      Identify inverted stimuli even though perception of upright stimuli seems normal

    • D. 

      Identify familiar voices

  • 12. 
    12. The cortex makes up the surface of what brain structure?
    • A. 

      The hindbrain

    • B. 

      The midbrain

    • C. 

      The thalamus

    • D. 

      The forebrain

  • 13. 
    13. Biederman’s recognition by components (RBC) model:
    • A. 

      Does not rely on a hierarchy of detectors

    • B. 

      Makes use of geon detectors, which in turn trigger detectors for geon assemblies

    • C. 

      Asserts that priming takes place primarily at levels higher than the level of geon detectors

    • D. 

      Can recognize three-dimensional objects provided they are seen from the appropriate viewing angle

  • 14. 
    14. Patients who have suffered damage to the occipital-parietal pathway (the “where” system) will have difficulties with which of the following tasks?
    • A. 

      Visually identifying a toothbrush on the counter in front of them

    • B. 

      Describing the function of the toothbrush without touching it

    • C. 

      Reaching in the correct direction to retrieve the toothbrush

    • D. 

      Knowing how to use the toothbrush once they have retrieved it

  • 15. 
    15. The primary motor projection area forms a “map” of the body, and the projections control movement to specific areas of the body. The amount of cortical tissue dedicated to specific parts of the body varies based on the:
    • A. 

      Size of the body part

    • B. 

      Distance of the body part from the brain

    • C. 

      Precision of movement for the body part

    • D. 

      Cortical area does not vary; it is the same for all body parts

  • 16. 
    • A. 

      Our behavior is routinely determined by our understanding of stimuli

    • B. 

      Humans are more similar to computers than to other species studied in the laboratory

    • C. 

      Psychology rejected behaviorism’s emphasis on an organism’s subjective states

    • D. 

      An organism’s behavior can be changed by learning

  • 17. 
    17. Which of the following statements is NOT true for feature-based models of pattern recognition?
    • A. 

      Features, as general-purpose building blocks, can help explain how humans recognize variations on a form (e.g., a cat in different positions or a letter in different type fonts).

    • B. 

      The visual system identifies small pieces of a pattern first and then combines them to form more complex wholes.

    • C. 

      Studies using people with parietal damage suggest that the detection of features is separate from the process to put the features together.

    • D. 

      The term “features” can also be used to describe a distinct object made up of several parts.

  • 18. 
    18. Participants are shown a visual stimulus for just 30 ms and are then asked, “Was there an E or a K in the stimulus?” We would expect the BEST performance if the stimulus was:
    • A. 

      BARK

    • B. 

      K

    • C. 

      BWQK

    • D. 

      GALK

  • 19. 
    19. The “word-superiority effect” refers to the fact that it is easier to recognize:
    • A. 

      Short (three- or four-letter) words than long words

    • B. 

      A letter within the context of a word than it is to recognize a letter presented by itself

    • C. 

      A word presented in a phrase than it is to recognize a word presented by itself

    • D. 

      Words that are frequently used under tachistoscopic conditions

  • 20. 
    20. Englishlike nonwords (e.g., “HICE”) are easier to perceive than strings of letters not resembling English words (e.g., “RSFK”) because:
    • A. 

      They are encountered more often

    • B. 

      Bigram detectors for more common letter combinations fire more readily

    • C. 

      They are more distinctive

    • D. 

      Word detectors will respond to near-words as well as true words

  • 21. 
    21. Once a cell fires, the part of a neuron that transmits information to another location is the:
    • A. 

      Dendrite

    • B. 

      Cell body

    • C. 

      Axon

    • D. 

      Nucleus