Close Reading Quiz Over Yann Martel's "Life Of Pi"

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Close Reading Quiz Over Yann Martels "Life Of Pi" - Quiz

Quiz over Yann Martel's "Life of Pi."


Questions and Answers
  • 1. 

    Alas, the sense of community that a common faith brings to a people spelled trouble for me. In time, my religious doings went from the notice of those to whom it didn’t matter and only amused, to that of those to whom it did matter- and they were not amused. “What is your son doing going to temple?” asked the priest. “Your son was seen in church crossing himself,” said the imam. “Your son has gone Muslim,” said the pandit. Yes, it was all forcefully brought to the attention of my bemused parents. You see, they didn’t know. They didn’t know that I was a practicing Hindu, Christian, and Muslim. Teenagers always hide a few things from their parents, isn’t that so? All sixteen-year olds have secrets, don’t they? But fate decided that my parents and I and the three wise men, as I shall call them, should meet one day on the Goubert Salai seaside esplanade and that my secret should be outed. It was a lovely, breezy, hot Sunday afternoon and the Bay of Bengal glittered under a blue sky. Townspeople were out for a stroll. Children screamed and laughed. Coloured balloons floated in the air. Ice cream sales were brisk. Why think of business on such a day, I ask? Why couldn’t they have just walked by with a nod and a smile? It was not to be. We were to meet not just one wise man but all three, and not one after another but at the same time, and each would decide upon seeing us that right then was the golden occasion to meet that Pondicherry notable, the zoo director, he of the model devout son. When I saw the first, I smiled; by the time I had laid eyes on the third, my smile had frozen into a mask of horror. When it was clear that all three were converging on us, my heart jumped before sinking very low. The wise men seemed annoyed when they realized that all three of them were approaching the same people. Each must have assumed that the others were there for some business other than pastoral and had rudely chosen that moment to deal with it. Glances of displeasure were exchanged. My parents looked puzzled to have their way gently blocked by three broadly smiling religious strangers. I should explain that my family was anything but orthodox. Father saw himself as part of the New India-rich, modern and as secular as ice cream. He didn’t have a religious bone in his body. He was a businessman, pronounced businessman in his case, a hardworking, earthbound professional, more concerned with inbreeding among the lions than any over-arching moral or existential scheme. It’s true that he had all new animals blessed by a priest and there were two small shrines at the zoo, one to Lord Ganesha and one to Hanuman, gods likely to please a zoo director, what with the first having the head of an elephant and the second being a monkey, but Father’s calculation was that this was good for business, not good for his soul, a matter of public relations rather than personal salvation… The figure of speech not used in the passage is:

    • A.

      Alliteration

    • B.

      Repetition

    • C.

      Allusion

    • D.

      Parenthesis

    • E.

      Apostrophe

    Correct Answer
    D. Parenthesis
    Explanation
    The figure of speech not used in the passage is parenthesis. The passage does not contain any instances of parenthetical phrases or clauses, where additional information is inserted within parentheses to provide clarification or emphasis. The passage does include examples of other figures of speech such as alliteration, repetition, allusion, and apostrophe.

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  • 2. 

    Alas, the sense of community that a common faith brings to a people spelled trouble for me. In time, my religious doings went from the notice of those to whom it didn’t matter and only amused, to that of those to whom it did matter- and they were not amused. “What is your son doing going to temple?” asked the priest. “Your son was seen in church crossing himself,” said the imam. “Your son has gone Muslim,” said the pandit. Yes, it was all forcefully brought to the attention of my bemused parents. You see, they didn’t know. They didn’t know that I was a practicing Hindu, Christian, and Muslim. Teenagers always hide a few things from their parents, isn’t that so? All sixteen-year olds have secrets, don’t they? But fate decided that my parents and I and the three wise men, as I shall call them, should meet one day on the Goubert Salai seaside esplanade and that my secret should be outed. It was a lovely, breezy, hot Sunday afternoon and the Bay of Bengal glittered under a blue sky. Townspeople were out for a stroll. Children screamed and laughed. Coloured balloons floated in the air. Ice cream sales were brisk. Why think of business on such a day, I ask? Why couldn’t they have just walked by with a nod and a smile? It was not to be. We were to meet not just one wise man but all three, and not one after another but at the same time, and each would decide upon seeing us that right then was the golden occasion to meet that Pondicherry notable, the zoo director, he of the model devout son. When I saw the first, I smiled; by the time I had laid eyes on the third, my smile had frozen into a mask of horror. When it was clear that all three were converging on us, my heart jumped before sinking very low. The wise men seemed annoyed when they realized that all three of them were approaching the same people. Each must have assumed that the others were there for some business other than pastoral and had rudely chosen that moment to deal with it. Glances of displeasure were exchanged. My parents looked puzzled to have their way gently blocked by three broadly smiling religious strangers. I should explain that my family was anything but orthodox. Father saw himself as part of the New India-rich, modern and as secular as ice cream. He didn’t have a religious bone in his body. He was a businessman, pronounced businessman in his case, a hardworking, earthbound professional, more concerned with inbreeding among the lions than any over-arching moral or existential scheme. It’s true that he had all new animals blessed by a priest and there were two small shrines at the zoo, one to Lord Ganesha and one to Hanuman, gods likely to please a zoo director, what with the first having the head of an elephant and the second being a monkey, but Father’s calculation was that this was good for business, not good for his soul, a matter of public relations rather than personal salvation… The type of imagery most used in the passage is

    • A.

      Kinetic

    • B.

      Olfactory

    • C.

      Visual

    • D.

      Tactile

    • E.

      Gustatory

    Correct Answer
    C. Visual
    Explanation
    The passage predominantly uses visual imagery to describe the setting and the actions taking place. The author vividly describes the scene at the Goubert Salai seaside esplanade, mentioning the blue sky, the glittering Bay of Bengal, the strolling townspeople, the colored balloons, and the brisk ice cream sales. The author also uses visual descriptions to convey emotions, such as the mask of horror on the narrator's face when realizing the three wise men are approaching. Overall, the passage relies on visual imagery to paint a clear picture in the reader's mind.

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  • 3. 

    Alas, the sense of community that a common faith brings to a people spelled trouble for me. In time, my religious doings went from the notice of those to whom it didn’t matter and only amused, to that of those to whom it did matter- and they were not amused. “What is your son doing going to temple?” asked the priest. “Your son was seen in church crossing himself,” said the imam. “Your son has gone Muslim,” said the pandit. Yes, it was all forcefully brought to the attention of my bemused parents. You see, they didn’t know. They didn’t know that I was a practicing Hindu, Christian, and Muslim. Teenagers always hide a few things from their parents, isn’t that so? All sixteen-year olds have secrets, don’t they? But fate decided that my parents and I and the three wise men, as I shall call them, should meet one day on the Goubert Salai seaside esplanade and that my secret should be outed. It was a lovely, breezy, hot Sunday afternoon and the Bay of Bengal glittered under a blue sky. Townspeople were out for a stroll. Children screamed and laughed. Coloured balloons floated in the air. Ice cream sales were brisk. Why think of business on such a day, I ask? Why couldn’t they have just walked by with a nod and a smile? It was not to be. We were to meet not just one wise man but all three, and not one after another but at the same time, and each would decide upon seeing us that right then was the golden occasion to meet that Pondicherry notable, the zoo director, he of the model devout son. When I saw the first, I smiled; by the time I had laid eyes on the third, my smile had frozen into a mask of horror. When it was clear that all three were converging on us, my heart jumped before sinking very low. The wise men seemed annoyed when they realized that all three of them were approaching the same people. Each must have assumed that the others were there for some business other than pastoral and had rudely chosen that moment to deal with it. Glances of displeasure were exchanged. My parents looked puzzled to have their way gently blocked by three broadly smiling religious strangers. I should explain that my family was anything but orthodox. Father saw himself as part of the New India-rich, modern and as secular as ice cream. He didn’t have a religious bone in his body. He was a businessman, pronounced businessman in his case, a hardworking, earthbound professional, more concerned with inbreeding among the lions than any over-arching moral or existential scheme. It’s true that he had all new animals blessed by a priest and there were two small shrines at the zoo, one to Lord Ganesha and one to Hanuman, gods likely to please a zoo director, what with the first having the head of an elephant and the second being a monkey, but Father’s calculation was that this was good for business, not good for his soul, a matter of public relations rather than personal salvation… In the passage, the speaker feels:

    • A.

      Annoyed

    • B.

      Unlucky

    • C.

      Nostalgic

    • D.

      Displeased

    • E.

      Content

    Correct Answer
    B. Unlucky
    Explanation
    The speaker feels unlucky because their secret of practicing multiple religions is forcefully brought to the attention of their parents and the three wise men. The speaker's smile turns into a mask of horror when they realize that all three wise men are converging on them. The speaker's heart sinks and they feel unlucky to be in this situation.

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  • 4. 

    Alas, the sense of community that a common faith brings to a people spelled trouble for me. In time, my religious doings went from the notice of those to whom it didn’t matter and only amused, to that of those to whom it did matter- and they were not amused. “What is your son doing going to temple?” asked the priest. “Your son was seen in church crossing himself,” said the imam. “Your son has gone Muslim,” said the pandit. Yes, it was all forcefully brought to the attention of my bemused parents. You see, they didn’t know. They didn’t know that I was a practicing Hindu, Christian, and Muslim. Teenagers always hide a few things from their parents, isn’t that so? All sixteen-year olds have secrets, don’t they? But fate decided that my parents and I and the three wise men, as I shall call them, should meet one day on the Goubert Salai seaside esplanade and that my secret should be outed. It was a lovely, breezy, hot Sunday afternoon and the Bay of Bengal glittered under a blue sky. Townspeople were out for a stroll. Children screamed and laughed. Coloured balloons floated in the air. Ice cream sales were brisk. Why think of business on such a day, I ask? Why couldn’t they have just walked by with a nod and a smile? It was not to be. We were to meet not just one wise man but all three, and not one after another but at the same time, and each would decide upon seeing us that right then was the golden occasion to meet that Pondicherry notable, the zoo director, he of the model devout son. When I saw the first, I smiled; by the time I had laid eyes on the third, my smile had frozen into a mask of horror. When it was clear that all three were converging on us, my heart jumped before sinking very low. The wise men seemed annoyed when they realized that all three of them were approaching the same people. Each must have assumed that the others were there for some business other than pastoral and had rudely chosen that moment to deal with it. Glances of displeasure were exchanged. My parents looked puzzled to have their way gently blocked by three broadly smiling religious strangers. I should explain that my family was anything but orthodox. Father saw himself as part of the New India-rich, modern and as secular as ice cream. He didn’t have a religious bone in his body. He was a businessman, pronounced businessman in his case, a hardworking, earthbound professional, more concerned with inbreeding among the lions than any over-arching moral or existential scheme. It’s true that he had all new animals blessed by a priest and there were two small shrines at the zoo, one to Lord Ganesha and one to Hanuman, gods likely to please a zoo director, what with the first having the head of an elephant and the second being a monkey, but Father’s calculation was that this was good for business, not good for his soul, a matter of public relations rather than personal salvation… The main purpose of Pi's rant about his father’s Gods of choice is to:

    • A.

      Show the contrast that the speaker carries from his family in terms of religion.

    • B.

      Inform the reader about why he has been maddened.

    • C.

      Contrast the allusion to Christianity.

    • D.

      To reduce the stress of the situation.

    • E.

      To provide a humorous break in the action.

    Correct Answer
    A. Show the contrast that the speaker carries from his family in terms of religion.
    Explanation
    The main purpose of Pi's rant about his father's Gods of choice is to show the contrast that the speaker carries from his family in terms of religion. This is evident in the passage where Pi describes his father as secular and not having a religious bone in his body, while also mentioning the small shrines to Lord Ganesha and Hanuman at the zoo. This highlights Pi's own religious practices and beliefs, which differ from those of his family. The rant serves to emphasize the divide between Pi and his family when it comes to religion.

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  • 5. 

    Alas, the sense of community that a common faith brings to a people spelled trouble for me. In time, my religious doings went from the notice of those to whom it didn’t matter and only amused, to that of those to whom it did matter- and they were not amused. “What is your son doing going to temple?” asked the priest. “Your son was seen in church crossing himself,” said the imam. “Your son has gone Muslim,” said the pandit. Yes, it was all forcefully brought to the attention of my bemused parents. You see, they didn’t know. They didn’t know that I was a practicing Hindu, Christian, and Muslim. Teenagers always hide a few things from their parents, isn’t that so? All sixteen-year olds have secrets, don’t they? But fate decided that my parents and I and the three wise men, as I shall call them, should meet one day on the Goubert Salai seaside esplanade and that my secret should be outed. It was a lovely, breezy, hot Sunday afternoon and the Bay of Bengal glittered under a blue sky. Townspeople were out for a stroll. Children screamed and laughed. Coloured balloons floated in the air. Ice cream sales were brisk. Why think of business on such a day, I ask? Why couldn’t they have just walked by with a nod and a smile? It was not to be. We were to meet not just one wise man but all three, and not one after another but at the same time, and each would decide upon seeing us that right then was the golden occasion to meet that Pondicherry notable, the zoo director, he of the model devout son. When I saw the first, I smiled; by the time I had laid eyes on the third, my smile had frozen into a mask of horror. When it was clear that all three were converging on us, my heart jumped before sinking very low. The wise men seemed annoyed when they realized that all three of them were approaching the same people. Each must have assumed that the others were there for some business other than pastoral and had rudely chosen that moment to deal with it. Glances of displeasure were exchanged. My parents looked puzzled to have their way gently blocked by three broadly smiling religious strangers. I should explain that my family was anything but orthodox. Father saw himself as part of the New India-rich, modern and as secular as ice cream. He didn’t have a religious bone in his body. He was a businessman, pronounced businessman in his case, a hardworking, earthbound professional, more concerned with inbreeding among the lions than any over-arching moral or existential scheme. It’s true that he had all new animals blessed by a priest and there were two small shrines at the zoo, one to Lord Ganesha and one to Hanuman, gods likely to please a zoo director, what with the first having the head of an elephant and the second being a monkey, but Father’s calculation was that this was good for business, not good for his soul, a matter of public relations rather than personal salvation… The word "bemused" can best be defined as:

    • A.

      Chafed

    • B.

      Haggard

    • C.

      Tumultuous

    • D.

      Bitter

    • E.

      Confounded

    Correct Answer
    E. Confounded
  • 6. 

    Alas, the sense of community that a common faith brings to a people spelled trouble for me. In time, my religious doings went from the notice of those to whom it didn’t matter and only amused, to that of those to whom it did matter- and they were not amused. “What is your son doing going to temple?” asked the priest. “Your son was seen in church crossing himself,” said the imam. “Your son has gone Muslim,” said the pandit. Yes, it was all forcefully brought to the attention of my bemused parents. You see, they didn’t know. They didn’t know that I was a practicing Hindu, Christian, and Muslim. Teenagers always hide a few things from their parents, isn’t that so? All sixteen-year olds have secrets, don’t they? But fate decided that my parents and I and the three wise men, as I shall call them, should meet one day on the Goubert Salai seaside esplanade and that my secret should be outed. It was a lovely, breezy, hot Sunday afternoon and the Bay of Bengal glittered under a blue sky. Townspeople were out for a stroll. Children screamed and laughed. Coloured balloons floated in the air. Ice cream sales were brisk. Why think of business on such a day, I ask? Why couldn’t they have just walked by with a nod and a smile? It was not to be. We were to meet not just one wise man but all three, and not one after another but at the same time, and each would decide upon seeing us that right then was the golden occasion to meet that Pondicherry notable, the zoo director, he of the model devout son. When I saw the first, I smiled; by the time I had laid eyes on the third, my smile had frozen into a mask of horror. When it was clear that all three were converging on us, my heart jumped before sinking very low. The wise men seemed annoyed when they realized that all three of them were approaching the same people. Each must have assumed that the others were there for some business other than pastoral and had rudely chosen that moment to deal with it. Glances of displeasure were exchanged. My parents looked puzzled to have their way gently blocked by three broadly smiling religious strangers. I should explain that my family was anything but orthodox. Father saw himself as part of the New India-rich, modern and as secular as ice cream. He didn’t have a religious bone in his body. He was a businessman, pronounced businessman in his case, a hardworking, earthbound professional, more concerned with inbreeding among the lions than any over-arching moral or existential scheme. It’s true that he had all new animals blessed by a priest and there were two small shrines at the zoo, one to Lord Ganesha and one to Hanuman, gods likely to please a zoo director, what with the first having the head of an elephant and the second being a monkey, but Father’s calculation was that this was good for business, not good for his soul, a matter of public relations rather than personal salvation… When the speaker discusses his father’s religion he shows an aura of:

    • A.

      Disdain

    • B.

      Concern

    • C.

      Frustration

    • D.

      Eagerness

    • E.

      Exaggeration

    Correct Answer
    B. Concern
    Explanation
    The speaker's tone when discussing his father's religion is one of concern. He mentions that his father doesn't have a religious bone in his body and sees himself as part of the New India, which is rich, modern, and secular. The speaker explains that his father's involvement in religious activities, such as blessing new animals and having shrines at the zoo, is more for business purposes and public relations rather than personal salvation. This suggests that the speaker is concerned about his father's lack of genuine religious belief and sees it as a superficial or insincere practice.

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  • 7. 

    Alas, the sense of community that a common faith brings to a people spelled trouble for me. In time, my religious doings went from the notice of those to whom it didn’t matter and only amused, to that of those to whom it did matter- and they were not amused. “What is your son doing going to temple?” asked the priest. “Your son was seen in church crossing himself,” said the imam. “Your son has gone Muslim,” said the pandit. Yes, it was all forcefully brought to the attention of my bemused parents. You see, they didn’t know. They didn’t know that I was a practicing Hindu, Christian, and Muslim. Teenagers always hide a few things from their parents, isn’t that so? All sixteen-year olds have secrets, don’t they? But fate decided that my parents and I and the three wise men, as I shall call them, should meet one day on the Goubert Salai seaside esplanade and that my secret should be outed. It was a lovely, breezy, hot Sunday afternoon and the Bay of Bengal glittered under a blue sky. Townspeople were out for a stroll. Children screamed and laughed. Coloured balloons floated in the air. Ice cream sales were brisk. Why think of business on such a day, I ask? Why couldn’t they have just walked by with a nod and a smile? It was not to be. We were to meet not just one wise man but all three, and not one after another but at the same time, and each would decide upon seeing us that right then was the golden occasion to meet that Pondicherry notable, the zoo director, he of the model devout son. When I saw the first, I smiled; by the time I had laid eyes on the third, my smile had frozen into a mask of horror. When it was clear that all three were converging on us, my heart jumped before sinking very low. The wise men seemed annoyed when they realized that all three of them were approaching the same people. Each must have assumed that the others were there for some business other than pastoral and had rudely chosen that moment to deal with it. Glances of displeasure were exchanged. My parents looked puzzled to have their way gently blocked by three broadly smiling religious strangers. I should explain that my family was anything but orthodox. Father saw himself as part of the New India-rich, modern and as secular as ice cream. He didn’t have a religious bone in his body. He was a businessman, pronounced businessman in his case, a hardworking, earthbound professional, more concerned with inbreeding among the lions than any over-arching moral or existential scheme. It’s true that he had all new animals blessed by a priest and there were two small shrines at the zoo, one to Lord Ganesha and one to Hanuman, gods likely to please a zoo director, what with the first having the head of an elephant and the second being a monkey, but Father’s calculation was that this was good for business, not good for his soul, a matter of public relations rather than personal salvation… In the passage, the word "orthodox most" closely means:

    • A.

      Conventional

    • B.

      Pretentious

    • C.

      Splendid

    • D.

      Stark

    • E.

      Featureless

    Correct Answer
    A. Conventional
    Explanation
    The word "orthodox" in the passage means conventional. This is evident from the context that describes the narrator's family as anything but orthodox, with the father being secular and not having a religious bone in his body. The passage also mentions that the father's involvement with religion is more for business and public relations purposes rather than personal belief or salvation. Therefore, the word "orthodox" in this context refers to traditional or conventional religious beliefs and practices.

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  • 8. 

    Alas, the sense of community that a common faith brings to a people spelled trouble for me. In time, my religious doings went from the notice of those to whom it didn’t matter and only amused, to that of those to whom it did matter- and they were not amused. “What is your son doing going to temple?” asked the priest. “Your son was seen in church crossing himself,” said the imam. “Your son has gone Muslim,” said the pandit. Yes, it was all forcefully brought to the attention of my bemused parents. You see, they didn’t know. They didn’t know that I was a practicing Hindu, Christian, and Muslim. Teenagers always hide a few things from their parents, isn’t that so? All sixteen-year olds have secrets, don’t they? But fate decided that my parents and I and the three wise men, as I shall call them, should meet one day on the Goubert Salai seaside esplanade and that my secret should be outed. It was a lovely, breezy, hot Sunday afternoon and the Bay of Bengal glittered under a blue sky. Townspeople were out for a stroll. Children screamed and laughed. Coloured balloons floated in the air. Ice cream sales were brisk. Why think of business on such a day, I ask? Why couldn’t they have just walked by with a nod and a smile? It was not to be. We were to meet not just one wise man but all three, and not one after another but at the same time, and each would decide upon seeing us that right then was the golden occasion to meet that Pondicherry notable, the zoo director, he of the model devout son. When I saw the first, I smiled; by the time I had laid eyes on the third, my smile had frozen into a mask of horror. When it was clear that all three were converging on us, my heart jumped before sinking very low. The wise men seemed annoyed when they realized that all three of them were approaching the same people. Each must have assumed that the others were there for some business other than pastoral and had rudely chosen that moment to deal with it. Glances of displeasure were exchanged. My parents looked puzzled to have their way gently blocked by three broadly smiling religious strangers. I should explain that my family was anything but orthodox. Father saw himself as part of the New India-rich, modern and as secular as ice cream. He didn’t have a religious bone in his body. He was a businessman, pronounced businessman in his case, a hardworking, earthbound professional, more concerned with inbreeding among the lions than any over-arching moral or existential scheme. It’s true that he had all new animals blessed by a priest and there were two small shrines at the zoo, one to Lord Ganesha and one to Hanuman, gods likely to please a zoo director, what with the first having the head of an elephant and the second being a monkey, but Father’s calculation was that this was good for business, not good for his soul, a matter of public relations rather than personal salvation… In the fifth paragraph (Line 11-35), there is a sense of irony because:

    • A.

      The speaker's parents are atheists

    • B.

      The speaker's father is a zoo director

    • C.

      The speaker intended for all of the religious leaders to meet

    • D.

      The speaker wanted to get away from all his stress

    • E.

      Most teenagers keep secrets in different ways from Pi's secrets.

    Correct Answer
    E. Most teenagers keep secrets in different ways from Pi's secrets.
    Explanation
    In the fifth paragraph, there is a sense of irony because the speaker's parents are portrayed as being puzzled and unaware of their son's religious practices, despite the fact that most parents would typically be aware of their teenager's secrets. This irony highlights the speaker's ability to successfully hide their multiple religious identities from their parents, emphasizing the uniqueness and complexity of their situation compared to typical teenage secrets.

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  • 9. 

    Alas, the sense of community that a common faith brings to a people spelled trouble for me. In time, my religious doings went from the notice of those to whom it didn’t matter and only amused, to that of those to whom it did matter- and they were not amused. “What is your son doing going to temple?” asked the priest. “Your son was seen in church crossing himself,” said the imam. “Your son has gone Muslim,” said the pandit. Yes, it was all forcefully brought to the attention of my bemused parents. You see, they didn’t know. They didn’t know that I was a practicing Hindu, Christian, and Muslim. Teenagers always hide a few things from their parents, isn’t that so? All sixteen-year olds have secrets, don’t they? But fate decided that my parents and I and the three wise men, as I shall call them, should meet one day on the Goubert Salai seaside esplanade and that my secret should be outed. It was a lovely, breezy, hot Sunday afternoon and the Bay of Bengal glittered under a blue sky. Townspeople were out for a stroll. Children screamed and laughed. Coloured balloons floated in the air. Ice cream sales were brisk. Why think of business on such a day, I ask? Why couldn’t they have just walked by with a nod and a smile? It was not to be. We were to meet not just one wise man but all three, and not one after another but at the same time, and each would decide upon seeing us that right then was the golden occasion to meet that Pondicherry notable, the zoo director, he of the model devout son. When I saw the first, I smiled; by the time I had laid eyes on the third, my smile had frozen into a mask of horror. When it was clear that all three were converging on us, my heart jumped before sinking very low. The wise men seemed annoyed when they realized that all three of them were approaching the same people. Each must have assumed that the others were there for some business other than pastoral and had rudely chosen that moment to deal with it. Glances of displeasure were exchanged. My parents looked puzzled to have their way gently blocked by three broadly smiling religious strangers. I should explain that my family was anything but orthodox. Father saw himself as part of the New India-rich, modern and as secular as ice cream. He didn’t have a religious bone in his body. He was a businessman, pronounced businessman in his case, a hardworking, earthbound professional, more concerned with inbreeding among the lions than any over-arching moral or existential scheme. It’s true that he had all new animals blessed by a priest and there were two small shrines at the zoo, one to Lord Ganesha and one to Hanuman, gods likely to please a zoo director, what with the first having the head of an elephant and the second being a monkey, but Father’s calculation was that this was good for business, not good for his soul, a matter of public relations rather than personal salvation… Which of the following is not an example of imagery?

    • A.

      "The Bay of Bengal glittered under a blue sky"

    • B.

      "Children screamed and laughed"

    • C.

      "Coloured balloons floated in the air"

    • D.

      "Ice cream sales were brisk"

    • E.

      "It was a lovely, breezy, hot Sunday afternoon."

    Correct Answer
    D. "Ice cream sales were brisk"
    Explanation
    The phrase "Ice cream sales were brisk" does not evoke any sensory details or create a vivid mental image. It is a statement of fact rather than a description that appeals to the senses. In contrast, the other options in the question all provide visual or auditory descriptions that paint a picture in the reader's mind.

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