Writing Chemical Formulas And Naming Compounds Quiz

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Zohra Sattar, PhD, Chemistry |
Chemistry Expert
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Dr. Zohra Sattar Waxali earned her doctorate in chemistry and biochemistry from Northwestern University, specializing in the metallomes of cardiac cells and stem cells, and their impact on biological function. Her research encompasses the development of arsenoplatin chemotherapeutics, stapled peptide estrogen receptor inhibitors, and antimicrobial natural products. With her expertise, Dr. Waxali ensures the accuracy and relevance of our chemistry quizzes, contributing to a comprehensive understanding of chemical principles and advancements in the field.
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Writing Chemical Formulas And Naming Compounds Quiz - Quiz

Test your proficiency in Writing Chemical Formulas and Naming Compounds with this concise quiz! Designed to enhance your understanding of chemical nomenclature, the quiz covers essential concepts such as ionic and covalent compounds, polyatomic ions, and rules for naming molecular substances. Challenge yourself with questions requiring the translation of chemical names to formulas and vice versa. Whether you're a student brushing up on fundamentals or a chemistry enthusiast, this quiz offers a quick and insightful assessment of your knowledge of the language of chemistry. Sharpen your skills in constructing and deciphering chemical formulas with this engaging quiz!


Questions and Answers
  • 1. 

    Write the chemical formula for: aluminum sulfide (Write subscripts can be written as regular numbers.)

    Explanation
    The valence number for Al is +3. The valence number for S is -2. Therefore 2 aluminum ions are needed in the formula and 3 sulfur ions are needed in the formula.

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  • 2. 

    Write the chemical formula for: calcium phosphate (Write subscripts as regular numbers.)

    Explanation
    Calcium phosphate is composed of calcium ions (Ca2+) and phosphate ions (PO43-). The chemical formula Ca3(PO4)2 indicates that there are three calcium ions and two phosphate ions in the compound. The subscript numbers indicate the number of each ion present in the compound.

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  • 3. 

    Write the chemical formula for: tin oxide. (Write subscripts as regular numbers.)

    Explanation
    The chemical formula for tin oxide can vary depending on its oxidation state (+2 or +4). The two most common forms of tin oxide are:
    Tin(II) Oxide: This is also known as stannous oxide. Its chemical formula is SnO.
    Tin(IV) Oxide: This is also known as stannic oxide or tin dioxide. Its chemical formula is SnO2.

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  • 4. 

    Write the chemical formula for: iron(III) sulfate

    Explanation
    The chemical formula for iron(III) sulfate is Fe2(SO4)3. In this compound, there are two iron atoms (Fe) and three sulfate ions (SO4). The Roman numeral III in parentheses after iron indicates that the iron ion has a +3 charge. The sulfate ion (SO4) has a -2 charge, so three sulfate ions are needed to balance the charge of two iron ions. Therefore, the correct formula is Fe2(SO4)3.

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  • 5. 

    Write the chemical formula for: ammonium phosphate.

    Explanation
     The valence number for NH4 is +1. The valence number for PO4 is -3, so 3 ammonium ions are needed to balance the charge of the phosphate ion.

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  • 6. 

    Write the name of: AlCl3

    Explanation
    AlCl3 is the chemical formula for aluminum chloride. It is composed of one aluminum ion and three chlorine ions. Aluminum chloride is a white, crystalline solid that is highly soluble in water. It is commonly used as a catalyst in various chemical reactions and as an ingredient in antiperspirants. The name "aluminum chloride" accurately describes the compound's composition, consisting of aluminum and chlorine elements.

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  • 7. 

    Write the name of: Mg3(PO4)2

    Explanation
    The name "magnesium phosphate" is the correct answer because Mg3(PO4)2 is a chemical formula that represents a compound containing magnesium (Mg) and phosphate (PO42-) ions. In this compound, there are three magnesium ions (3Mg2+) and two phosphate ions (PO4) present. Therefore, the name "magnesium phosphate" accurately describes the composition of this compound.

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  • 8. 

    Write the name of: Sn3(PO4)2

    Explanation
    The correct answer is tin(II) phosphate because Sn3(PO4)2 is a chemical formula that represents a compound made up of tin (Sn2+) and phosphate (PO43+) ions. The compound is named using the rules of chemical nomenclature, where the cation (tin) is named first, followed by the anion (phosphate). The Roman numeral II in parentheses following Sn indicates that the Sn cations have a 2+ charge. Hence, the name "tin phosphate" accurately represents the composition of the compound.

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  • 9. 

    Write the name of: NH4ClO3

    Explanation
    NH4ClO3 is the chemical formula for ammonium chlorate. It is composed of one ammonium ion (NH4+) and one chlorate ion (ClO3-). The name "ammonium chlorate" accurately represents the composition of the compound, with "ammonium" referring to the ammonium ion and "chlorate" referring to the chlorate ion.

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  • 10. 

    Write the formula of: carbon disulfide

    Explanation
    The formula for carbon disulfide is CS2. In this compound, there is one carbon atom bonded to two sulfur atoms. The subscript 2 indicates that there are two sulfur atoms present in the molecule.

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  • 11. 

    Write the formula of: sulfur hexafluoride

    Explanation
    The chemical formula for sulfur hexafluoride is SF6. In this compound, sulfur (S) forms a covalent bond with six fluorine (F) atoms, resulting in the molecular formula SF6.

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  • 12. 

    Write the name of: Cl2O7

    Explanation
    The correct name for the compound Cl2O7 is dichlorine heptoxide. Chlorine and oxygen are both nonmetals, indicating that this is a covalently bonded molecule. The prefix "di-" indicates that there are two chlorine atoms, and the prefix "hept-" indicates that there are seven oxygen atoms. The suffix "-oxide" indicates that the compound contains oxygen. Therefore, the name "dichlorine heptoxide" accurately describes the composition of the compound.

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  • 13. 

    Write the name of: P2O5

    Explanation
    The correct name for P2O5 is diphosphorus pentoxide. This is because the compound consists of two phosphorus atoms (di- meaning two) and five oxygen atoms (penta- meaning five) in a covalently bonded compound composed of nonmetals. The name is written as a single word without spaces or hyphens.

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  • 14. 

    True or False: Ionic compounds require the use of prefixes to indicate the number of each kind of atom. Covalent compounds do not require prefixes.

    • A.

      True

    • B.

      False

    Correct Answer
    B. False
    Explanation
    Ionic compounds do not require the use of prefixes to indicate the number of each kind of atom. In ionic compounds, the atoms combine in fixed ratios determined by their charges, so the number of each kind of atom is already indicated by the formula. On the other hand, covalent compounds, which are formed by the sharing of electrons between atoms, require the use of prefixes to indicate the number of each kind of atom in the molecule.

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  • 15. 

    True or False: Metals tend to give away electrons during ionic bonding. Nonmetals tend to accept electrons during ionic bonding.

    • A.

      True

    • B.

      False

    Correct Answer
    A. True
    Explanation
    Metals tend to give away electrons during ionic bonding because they have fewer valence electrons and a lower electronegativity. This allows them to easily lose electrons and form positive ions. On the other hand, nonmetals tend to accept electrons during ionic bonding because they have more valence electrons and a higher electronegativity. This enables them to gain electrons and form negative ions. Therefore, the statement that metals give away electrons and nonmetals accept electrons during ionic bonding is true.

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Zohra Sattar |PhD, Chemistry |
Chemistry Expert
Dr. Zohra Sattar Waxali earned her doctorate in chemistry and biochemistry from Northwestern University, specializing in the metallomes of cardiac cells and stem cells, and their impact on biological function. Her research encompasses the development of arsenoplatin chemotherapeutics, stapled peptide estrogen receptor inhibitors, and antimicrobial natural products. With her expertise, Dr. Waxali ensures the accuracy and relevance of our chemistry quizzes, contributing to a comprehensive understanding of chemical principles and advancements in the field.
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