Charge, Electricity, And Circuits

11 Questions | Total Attempts: 237

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Electricity Quizzes & Trivia

Basically, the act of moving or revolving around as in a circle or orbit is what defines a circuit. In electricity, a circuit is an enclosed path of an electric current and it’s usually designed for a particular function. The quiz below on charge, electricity, and circuits will broaden your understanding. Give it a try!


Questions and Answers
  • 1. 
    A circuit has three resistors of 2 O, 6 O, and 10 O in series with a 3 V battery.A. What is the equivalent resistance?B. What is the current in the circuit?C. How much power is used by the circuit?D. How much energy is used by the circuit in 10 minutes?
  • 2. 
    What is the standard electric potential delivered in household circuits?
    • A. 

      120 V

    • B. 

      120 O

    • C. 

      120 A

    • D. 

      120 O

    • E. 

      240 A

  • 3. 
    The difference between conventional current and the true flow of charge in a circuit is best stated by the following:
    • A. 

      The flow of actual charges is the same as conventional current.

    • B. 

      Actual charges move much faster than those depicted by conventional current.

    • C. 

      The true flow of charge in a circuit is in the opposite direction of conventional current.

    • D. 

      Conventional current indicates how charges really move in a circuit, which is from the positive to the negative terminal of a battery.

  • 4. 
    The image shown is the circuit symbol for a
    • A. 

      Battery.

    • B. 

      Switch.

    • C. 

      Motor.

    • D. 

      Resistor.

    • E. 

      None of the above.

  • 5. 
    When sketching electrical fields around a charged object,
    • A. 

      Arrows are drawn from the positively charged object.

    • B. 

      Arrows are drawn from the negatively charged object.

    • C. 

      Lines are drawn connecting the any two charged objects.

    • D. 

      Arrows are drawn from all charged objects.

  • 6. 
    A voltmeter reads _____________.
    • A. 

      Current.

    • B. 

      Resistance.

    • C. 

      Charge.

    • D. 

      Electric potential difference.

    • E. 

      None of the above.

  • 7. 
    Which of the following would NOT effect resistance:
    • A. 

      Temperature.

    • B. 

      Material composition.

    • C. 

      Length.

    • D. 

      Cross sectional area.

    • E. 

      All of the above effect resistance.

  • 8. 
    All objects with a resistance obey Ohm's law.
    • A. 

      True

    • B. 

      False

  • 9. 
    A voltmeter must be placed _________ to a resistor to be used.
    • A. 

      Below

    • B. 

      In parallel

    • C. 

      In series next

    • D. 

      Close

  • 10. 
    A fuse melts if the circuit it is in:
    • A. 

      Is drawing too much current.

    • B. 

      Has too much resistance.

    • C. 

      Has too little electric potential.

    • D. 

      Has too high of a capacitance.

  • 11. 
    The electric company provides a household with:
    • A. 

      Electrons that replenish those used to run household appliances.

    • B. 

      Electric potential to charges in home circuits.

    • C. 

      Resistance to prevent overloading of household circuits.

    • D. 

      Capacitance to run appliances.

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