Chapter 5 Review - Probability (Jimenez)

15 Questions | Total Attempts: 72

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Chapter 5 Review - Probability (Jimenez)

Probability of various events, including dependent and independent events.


Questions and Answers
  • 1. 
    A deck of 24 cards is numbered 1, 2, 3, ... 24. Suppose you pick a card at random without looking. Find the probability of each event. Write as a fraction in simplest form.Find: P(10)
    • A. 

      21/24

    • B. 

      1/21

    • C. 

      1/24

    • D. 

      24/21

  • 2. 
    Terrance, Rodrigo, Bethany, and Colleen are sitting in a row at a movie theater. In how many ways can the friends be arranged if Collen needs to be on the left end of the row?`
    • A. 

      4

    • B. 

      6

    • C. 

      8

    • D. 

      16

  • 3. 
    The spinner shown is spun once. Find each probability. Write each answer as a fraction, a decimal, and a percent.P(even)
    • A. 

      0, 0.0, 0%

    • B. 

      3/8, 0.375, 37.5%

    • C. 

      1, 1.0, 100%

    • D. 

      1/2, 0.5, 50%

  • 4. 
    Glenn surveyed 40 of his classmates to determine their favorite cafeteria food. The results of his survey are shown in the table. Favorite FoodNumber of StudentsMeatloaf4Tacos5Hamburgers9Pizza18Fish4What is the probability of fish being a student’s favorite cafeteria food?
    • A. 

      1/9

    • B. 

      1/10

    • C. 

      3/25

    • D. 

      4/40

  • 5. 
    Glenn surveyed 40 of his classmates to determine their favorite cafeteria food. The results of his survey are shown in the table. Favorite FoodNumber of StudentsMeatloaf4Tacos5Hamburgers9Pizza18Fish4    Suppose there are 200 students in the cafeteria during lunch. How many students would you expect to choose hamburgers as their favorite cafeteria food?
    • A. 

      45

    • B. 

      104

    • C. 

      18

    • D. 

      72

  • 6. 
    Parker rolled a number cube 50 times. The number four appeared 16 times. What is the experimental probability of rolling a 4?
    • A. 

      3/16

    • B. 

      8/25

    • C. 

      16/3

    • D. 

      25/8

  • 7. 
    A coin is tossed 20 times, and it lands on heads 14 times. How does the experimental probability compare to the theoretical probability?
    • A. 

      Experimental probability (7/10) is slightly greater than the theoretical probability (1/2).

    • B. 

      Experimental probability (7/10) is slightly less than the theoretical probability (1/2).

    • C. 

      Experimental probability (1/2) is slightly greater than the theoretical probability (7/10).

    • D. 

      Experimental probability (1/2) is slightly less than the theoretical probability (7/10).

  • 8. 
    School polo shirts come in small, medium, large, and extra large. They are available in 3 colors: red, blue, and green. What is the probability of choosing a large red shirt?
    • A. 

      1/12

    • B. 

      1/9

    • C. 

      1/13

    • D. 

      1/20

  • 9. 
    You and a friend plan on going on 2 more rides at the amusement park before going home. You can choose from Amazing Falls, Tiger Canyon, Avalanche, Glacier Mountain, Indy Five, and the Bat. Your friend decides to write the names of the rides two times each on pieces of paper and place them in a hat. You each randomly select a ride without replacing your choice in the hat.What is the probability that you both select Indy Five? 
    • A. 

      1/6

    • B. 

      1/11

    • C. 

      2/17

    • D. 

      1/66

  • 10. 
    For number 9, is this a dependent or independent event?
    • A. 

      Dependent

    • B. 

      Independent

    • C. 

      Neither

    • D. 

      Both

  • 11. 
    A veterinarian has the animals listed in the table below staying at the hospital. Find the probabilities of what animal the veterinarian will care for next:  P(bird or dog or rabbit).  (Answer needs to be in decimal form. Example:   1/4 = 0.25) AnimalNumber in the Hospitalbird2cat4dog8rabbit1reptile7
  • 12. 
    A bag contains 4 green tokens, 2 red tokens, and 4 purple tokens. Lisa drew a token out of the bag, recorded the result, and then put the token back into the bag. She did this 30 times and recorded the results in a bar graph. Use this information to answer the following questions.What was the experimental probability of drawing a red token? Simplify. 
    • A. 

      1/15

    • B. 

      1/2

    • C. 

      2/15

    • D. 

      15/30

  • 13. 
    Suppose Lisa repeats the experiment an additional 250 times and records the results. About how many times would you expect her to draw a green token? (Round to the nearest whole number)
  • 14. 
    A spinner with six equal sections marked 1, 2, 3, 4, 5 and 6 was spun 200 times.  If this spinner is spun 40 more times, predict how many of these times the pointer will land on 6? (Round to the nearest whole number) SectionFrequency148252326426524624
    • A. 

      24

    • B. 

      5

    • C. 

      10

    • D. 

      26

  • 15. 
    A bowl contains 8 red balls and 7 blue balls. One is drawn at random and not replaced. A second ball is then drawn. What is the probability that the first ball is blue and the second is red?
    • A. 

      1/2

    • B. 

      49/210

    • C. 

      14/30

    • D. 

      4/15

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