Neuroscience Exam Practice Quiz

44 Questions | Total Attempts: 1408

SettingsSettingsSettings
Please wait...
Neuroscience Quizzes & Trivia

The brain is the single most complex organ in the entire human body, and today we’ll be asking a heap of questions regarding it as we focus on the study of neuroscience – also known as the study of the nervous system. What do you know about the scientific study? Take the quiz and find out.


Questions and Answers
  • 1. 
    The pons and cerebellum relate with this secondary embryonic vesicle
    • A. 

      Telencephalon

    • B. 

      Metencephalon

    • C. 

      Diencephalon

    • D. 

      Mesencephalon

    • E. 

      Myelencephalon

  • 2. 
    The cerebellum is          to the cerebellum
    • A. 

      Superficial

    • B. 

      Deep

    • C. 

      Caudal

    • D. 

      Rostral

    • E. 

      Medial

  • 3. 
    From superficial to deep, the meninges occur in this order:
    • A. 

      Arachnoid, pia mater, dura mater

    • B. 

      Pia mater, arachnoid, dura mater

    • C. 

      Pia mater, dura mater, arachnoid

    • D. 

      Dura mater, arachnoid, pia mater

    • E. 

      Dura mater, pia mater, arachnoid

  • 4. 
    The blood-brain barrier (BBB) consist of
    • A. 

      Gap junctions between endothelial cells that form the capillary walls

    • B. 

      Desmosomes and tight junctions between astrocytes and endothelial cells that form capillary walls

    • C. 

      Tight junctions between enothelial cells that form the capillary wall

    • D. 

      Gap and tight junctions between astrocytes and endothelial cells that form the capillary walls.

    • E. 

      Gap junctions between ependymal cells and endothelial cells that form the capillary walls

  • 5. 
    The blood-brain barrier (BBB) is most permeable to
    • A. 

      Platelets, white blood cells and red blood cells

    • B. 

      Sodium. potassium and chloride

    • C. 

      Urea and creatinine

    • D. 

      Glucose and oxygen

    • E. 

      Antibiotics

  • 6. 
    The gray matter of the brain forms a surface layer called         and deeper masses called      surrounded by white matter.
    • A. 

      Cortex; nuclei

    • B. 

      Nucei;tracts

    • C. 

      Cortex;medulla

    • D. 

      Medulla; midbrain

    • E. 

      Medulla; nerves

  • 7. 
    The right and eft cerebral hemispheres are seperated from each other by
    • A. 

      The brainstem

    • B. 

      The corpus callosum

    • C. 

      The longitudinal fissure

    • D. 

      Many sulci

    • E. 

      Many gyri

  • 8. 
    Cerebrospinal fluid is secreted by choroid plexuses in the      ventricles  and reabsorbed by arachonoid villi in the    .
    • A. 

      Lateral, third and fourth; superior sagittal sinus

    • B. 

      Lateral, and third; superior sagittal sinus

    • C. 

      Lateral, third and fourth; central canal of the spinal cord

    • D. 

      Lateral; central canal of the spinal cord

    • E. 

      Lateral, third and fourth; superior saggital sinus

  • 9. 
    The reticular formation is a web of      scattered throughout the     .
    • A. 

      Nerves; white matter in the cerebrum

    • B. 

      White matter; cerebellum

    • C. 

      Neurosomas; hypothalamus

    • D. 

      Gray matter; brainstem

    • E. 

      Gray matter; cerebrum

  • 10. 
    The following are all major components of the brainstem except
    • A. 

      The pons

    • B. 

      The cerebellum

    • C. 

      The medulla oblongata

    • D. 

      The midbrain

    • E. 

      The diencephalon

  • 11. 
    Degeneration of neurons in this structure, which inhibits unwanted body movements, leads to the muscle tremors of Parkinson disease
    • A. 

      Pons

    • B. 

      Substantia nigra

    • C. 

      Tegmentum

    • D. 

      Inferior colliculi

    • E. 

      Cerebral crus

  • 12. 
    The medulla oblongata orginates from
    • A. 

      The telencephalon

    • B. 

      The diencephalon

    • C. 

      The myelencehalon

    • D. 

      The metencephalon

    • E. 

      The mesencephalon

  • 13. 
    Loss of equillibrium and motor coordination would most likely be related with a lesion in the
    • A. 

      Limbic system

    • B. 

      Pons

    • C. 

      Cerebellum

    • D. 

      Medulla oblongata

    • E. 

      Pituitary gland

  • 14. 
    A lesion of the        would probably cause a person to sleep for random lengths of time during a 24-hour period
    • A. 

      Satiety center

    • B. 

      Suprachiasmatic nucleus

    • C. 

      Mammillary nuclei

    • D. 

      Pituitary gland

    • E. 

      Medial geniculate nucleus

  • 15. 
    The cardiac, vasomotor, and respiratory centers are found in
    • A. 

      The pons

    • B. 

      The medulla oblongata

    • C. 

      The midbrain

    • D. 

      The spinal cord

    • E. 

      The diencephalon

  • 16. 
    The thalamus, hypothalamus, and epithalamus are derivatives of the embryonic
    • A. 

      Telencephalon

    • B. 

      Diencephalon

    • C. 

      Mesencephalon

    • D. 

      Metencephalon

    • E. 

      Myelencephalon

  • 17. 
    The arbor vitae is a structure found in
    • A. 

      The cerebellum

    • B. 

      The tegmentum in the midbrain

    • C. 

      The reticular formation

    • D. 

      The diencephalon

    • E. 

      Both right and left cerebral hemispheres

  • 18. 
    Nearly all the somatosensory input to the cerebrum passes by way of synapses in
    • A. 

      The epithalamus

    • B. 

      The cerebellum

    • C. 

      The reticular formation

    • D. 

      The thalamus

    • E. 

      The hypothalamus

  • 19. 
    The       is the largest part of the hindbrain
    • A. 

      Cerebrum

    • B. 

      Brainstem

    • C. 

      Hypothalamus

    • D. 

      Cerebellum

    • E. 

      Pons

  • 20. 
    Cerebrospinal fluid serves these purposes except,
    • A. 

      To protect the brain from sticking to the cranium

    • B. 

      To provide oxygen and nutrients to the nervous tissue

    • C. 

      To allow the brain to attain considerable size without being impaired by its own weight

    • D. 

      To rinse metabolic wastes from the nervous tissue

    • E. 

      To regulate the chemical environment of the nervous tissue

  • 21. 
    Sex drive, body temperature, and food and water intake are regulated by
    • A. 

      The hypothalamus

    • B. 

      The limbic system

    • C. 

      The thalamus

    • D. 

      The pineal gland

    • E. 

      The pituitary gland

  • 22. 
    The occipital lobe is
    • A. 

      The principal visual center of the brain

    • B. 

      Chiefly concerned with mood, memory, and emotions

    • C. 

      The primary site for receiving and interpreting signals from the general senses

    • D. 

      Concerned with voluntary motor functions

    • E. 

      Likely to play a role in understanding spoken language

  • 23. 
    Most gray matter of the cerebrum is located in
    • A. 

      The substantia

    • B. 

      The basal nucei

    • C. 

      The neocortex

    • D. 

      The reticular formation

    • E. 

      The limbic system

  • 24. 
    The pons is not associated with
    • A. 

      Sensory information from the superior region of the face

    • B. 

      Lateral eye movements

    • C. 

      Neck movements

    • D. 

      Sensory information from the inferior region of the face

    • E. 

      Sensory information from the middle region of the face

  • 25. 
    The          function(s) in visual attention, such as to look and follow the flight of a butterfly.
    • A. 

      Superior colliculi

    • B. 

      Tegmentum

    • C. 

      Red nucleus

    • D. 

      Substantia nigra

    • E. 

      Inferior collliculi