Test Your Knowledge On Inferences And Proportions Quiz!

10 Questions | Total Attempts: 171

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Inference Quizzes & Trivia

Which inference procedure would you use in each of these cases? For now, we will assume that the conditions for these procedures are satisfied. Choose the most direct method of solving each problem. Try hard and take your time. So, let's try out the quiz. All the best!


Questions and Answers
  • 1. 
    Which of these is NOT one of the conditions that must be checked for one-proportion hypothesis tests?
    • A. 

      The products np and n(1-p) are greater than or equal to 10.

    • B. 

      The alpha must be 0.05.

    • C. 

      The data are from a SRS of independent observations

    • D. 

      The population is at least 10 times as large as the sample

  • 2. 
    When constructing a one-proportion confidence interval (a confidence interval for one proportion), we use the value of p-hat
    • A. 

      When calculating the standard error of p-hat

    • B. 

      As the point estimate for the population parameter, p

    • C. 

      For checking our assumptions/conditions before constructing the interval

    • D. 

      In all of these cases

  • 3. 
    For a two-sample confidence interval, we have the following information: x1, n1, x2, and n2. What do we check to make sure that we can use a normal approximation?
    • A. 

      X1 and x2 are > 5

    • B. 

      X1 > 5 and x2 > 5

    • C. 

      X1 & x2 > 5

    • D. 

      X1 > 5 & x2 > 5

    • E. 

      Both x1 and x2 are greater than 5

  • 4. 
    Which estimate for the proportion is used when performing a two-sample hypothesis test of p1 = p2? Assume that you are given x1, n1, x2, and n2.
    • A. 

      The pooled sample proportion

    • B. 

      (x1 + x2)/(n1 + n2)

    • C. 

      (x1+x2)/(n1+n2)

    • D. 

      The sum of the successes divided by the sum of the attempts

  • 5. 
    •   You are given x and n from a random sample and you want an estimate for the population proportion.
    • A. 

      Sample confidence interval for the mean

    • B. 

       sample confidence interval for the difference of proportions

    • C. 

      Proportion confidence interval

    • D. 

      Sample hypotheses test for the difference of proportions

    • E. 

      Paired t-test

  • 6. 
    You are given the difference between pretest and posttest measures for a set of participants. You believe that there is no improvement from pre- to post-test.
    • A. 

      Sample confidence interval for the mean

    • B. 

      Sample confidence interval for the difference of proportions

    • C. 

      Proportion confidence interval

    • D. 

      Sample hypotheses test for the difference of proportions

    • E. 

      Paired t-test

  • 7. 
    You are given x-bar(1)and x-bar(2),s(1), s(2), n(1), n(2) from two independent samples and you want an estimate of the difference between the two population means.
    • A. 

      Sample t-confidence interval for the mean

    • B. 

      Sample t-confidence interval for the difference of means

    • C. 

      Proportion confidence interval

    • D. 

       sample hypotheses t-test for the difference of means

    • E. 

      Paired t-test

  • 8. 
    Two sets of 60 high school students each were taught algebra by two methods, respectively. The experimental group used programmed learning and no formal lectures; the control group was given formal lectures by a teacher. At the end of the experiment, both groups were given a standardized test, and the number of students scoring above 85% was recorded: 41 out of 60 of the experimental group had scores above 85%; 24 out of 60 in the control group had scores above 85%. Test the hypothesis that the two groups were not different in their performance on the standardized test. Which procedure would be most appropriate for testing the data?
    • A. 

      Wo-sample z-test for means

    • B. 

      Two-sample t-test for means

    • C. 

      One sample z-test for proportion

    • D. 

      Two sample z-test for proportions

    • E. 

      Linear Regression t-test

  • 9. 
    A vegetable canner claims that the mean fill per 16-ounce can is 16.1 ounces. Several underweight complaints have been lodged against the company, and the canner wants to see if the machine set for the fill mechanism is correct. That is, he wishes to test the hypothesis that µ = 16.1 ounces. Experience with the machine has shown that the variation in fill observed over a number of years is σ =.11 ounces. A random sample of n = 10 cans gave the following measurements in ounces: 16.1, 16.0, 16.2, 15.9, 16.0, 16.1, 16.1, 15.9, 16.1, 16.0. Do these data indicate that µ differs from 16.1 ounces? Which would be the appropriate testing procedure for this scenario?
    • A. 

      One-sample z-test for a mean

    • B. 

      One-sample t-test for a mean

    • C. 

      Two-sample t-test for means

    • D. 

      One sample z-test for proportion

    • E. 

      Hi-Square Test for Goodness of Fit

  • 10. 
    Ten sets of identical twins, all wanting to learn French, were divided into two groups, each group containing one of each twin pair. Group 1 was flown to France, where they lived for one month. Group 2 was enrolled in an intensive French course at a local university. At the end of one month, all subjects were given a standard French language exam. Which procedure is appropriate for performing the analysis of the exam scores?
    • A. 

      One-sample z-test for a mean

    • B. 

      Two-sample z-test for means

    • C. 

      One-sample t-test for a mean

    • D. 

      Two-sample t-test for means

    • E. 

      One sample z-test for proportion