Inferences: Biblical Or Otherwise Quiz

22 Questions

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Poem Quizzes & Trivia

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Questions and Answers
  • 1. 
    When a poem's speaker describes beautiful flowers, bright sunshine and a happy childhood, you might conclude that he or she
    • A. 

      Spends a lot of time outside.

    • B. 

      Has a positive outlook on life.

    • C. 

      Writes poems a lot

    • D. 

      Is unhappy most of the time

    • E. 

      None of the above

  • 2. 
    Turner almost wished he hadn't listened to the radio.  He went to the closet and grabbed his umbrella.  He would feel silly carrying it to the bus stop.
    • A. 

      Turner had promised himself to do something silly that morning.

    • B. 

      It was raining outside.

    • C. 

      Turner had to return the umbrella to his teacher.

    • D. 

      Turner had heard a weather forecast that predicted rain.

    • E. 

      All of the above

  • 3. 
    Bill and Jessica are almost done taking turns choosing the players for their teams.  It was Jessica's turn to choose and Kurt was the only person left.  Jessica called Kurt's name. We can infer that
    • A. 

      Kurt is not a very good player.

    • B. 

      Kurt is on Bill's team.

    • C. 

      Jessica was inconsiderate of Kurt's feelings.

    • D. 

      Bill, Jessica, Kurt and the other players are playing basketball.

    • E. 

      Kurt is mean.

  • 4. 
    Jesse slowly made his way into the classroom.  He sat in the back row and put his head down.  Mr. Miser announced that today they were playing a trivia game and the winning students would recieve extra credit. What can you infer?
    • A. 

      Jesse enjoys Mr. Misers class.

    • B. 

      Mr. Miser teaches math.

    • C. 

      Jesse does not like Mr. Miser's class.

    • D. 

      Mr. Miser is Jesse's favorite teacher.

    • E. 

      Both B and C

  • 5. 
    Help Wanted: Young person to work at Cardinal's ballpark.  Some sales experience helpful, but not necessary.  Uniform provided.  Apply at concession stand at the coroner of Broadway and 2nd Ave. The person who takes this job will probably be
    • A. 

      A major league baseball player

    • B. 

      An usher.

    • C. 

      a ticket salesman

    • D. 

      A hot dog vendor.

    • E. 

      None of the above.

  • 6. 
    Randy walked into his room and discovered that his hamster, Pickled, had croaked.  He cleaned out an old box and carefully placed Pickles inside.  Randy then dug a hole in his backyard and buried the tiny box. Later, he placed a large rock over the mound. What can you infer?
    • A. 

      Randy was happy Pickles finally died because he was getting old.

    • B. 

      Randy knew Pickles was getting ready to die.

    • C. 

      Randy caredf for Pickles.

    • D. 

      Randy didn't know what to do with a dead hamster.

  • 7. 
    Jill hands were trembling and sweat ran down her back. Her face was red and she could feel her ears turning pink, too.  Jill grabbed her speech and walked on stage.  She smiled at the audience. What can you infer?
    • A. 

      Jill has to give a speech.

    • B. 

      Jill is nervous.

    • C. 

      Jill was prepared.

    • D. 

      All of the above.

    • E. 

      None of the above.

  • 8. 
    Jim spends most of his time staring at the cement walls.  He wishes he would have done things differently.  Jim hates the meals he is served.  He also hates having to wear the required uniform.  Where is Jim most likely at?
    • A. 

      Construction site

    • B. 

      School

    • C. 

      Jail

    • D. 

      The passage does not have enough information to be sure.

  • 9. 
    Sally sat down at the dinner table.  Her plate was piled high with her mother's home cooking.  Sally took very small bites and pushed the food around her plate.  Her parents asked how her day was and made small talk.  Sally wished her dog, Bubba, wasn't outside. What can you infer?
    • A. 

      Sally isn't hungry.

    • B. 

      Sally doesn't like what her mother made for dinner.

    • C. 

      Sally's mother's cooking is awful.

    • D. 

      All of the above

  • 10. 
    "Larry, as your boss, I must say it has been very interesting working with you," Ms. Valdez said.  "However, it seems that our company's needs and your performance style are not well matched. What is Ms. Valdez telling Larry?
    • A. 

      She would feel bad if Larry quit.

    • B. 

      Larry is being fired.

    • C. 

      Larry is getting a raise.

    • D. 

      She really enjoyed working with him.

    • E. 

      Larry had good performance reviews.

  • 11. 
    Turner almost wished he hadn't listened to the radio.  He went to the closet and grabbed his umbrella.  He would feel silly carrying it to the bus stop.
    • A. 

      Turner had promised himself to do something silly that morning.

    • B. 

      It was raining outside.

    • C. 

      Turner had to return the umbrella to his teacher.

    • D. 

      Turner had heard a weather forecast that predicted rain.

    • E. 

      All of the above

  • 12. 
    "Larry, as your boss, I must say it has been very intersting working with you," Ms. Valdez said.  "However, it seems that our company's needs and your performance style are not well matched. What is Ms. Valdez telling Larry?
    • A. 

      She would feel bad if Larry quit.

    • B. 

      Larry is being fired.

    • C. 

      Larry is getting a raise.

    • D. 

      She really enjoyed working with him.

    • E. 

      Larry had good performance reviews.

  • 13. 
    Bill and Jessica are almost done taking turns choosing the players for their teams.  It was Jessica's turn to choose and Kurt was the only person left.  Jessica called Kurt's name. We can infer that
    • A. 

      Kurt is not a very good player.

    • B. 

      Kurt is on Bill's team.

    • C. 

      Jessica was inconsiderate of Kurt's feelings.

    • D. 

      Bill, Jessica, Kurt and the other players are playing basketball.

    • E. 

      Kurt is mean.

  • 14. 
    Not too long ago, two women sat down at a French Roast restaurant on Broadway in New York. The women were not alone. They had their dogs with them. One had a golden retriever, the other a rookie. At one time, the women would have been shown the door by the manager because, except for guide dogs used by the blind, dogs were not allowed in restaurants. Such rules about dogs and other pets, however, may well be becoming a thing of the past as more and more people insist that their dogs are necessary to their emotional well-being. In fact, when the manager at French Roast questioned the dogs' presence, that is exactly what he was told: The dogs were providing their owners with emotional support. One of the women even had a letter from her doctor saying just that: She needed the dog nearby in order to function. Two years before the restaurant episode, tenants had used the same strategy to force their landlords into accepting the presence of dogs in two New York apartment buildings. Dog owners have become bolder about insisting on the presence of their pets ever since a 2003 ruling by the Department of Transportation (DOT) stating that people with emotional ailments like depression or anxiety should be allowed to have dogs present on airplanes. In short, they should be treated like other disabled people and allowed the company of a service animal. Whatever the DOT's original intentions, the chances are good that the ruling will be abused, and some people will want to bring their dogs to a restaurant or concert simply because of a bad day at work. (Source of information: Beth Landman, "Wagging the Dog, and a Finger," The New York Times, May 14, 2006, section 9, p. 1)
    • A. 

      The Department of Transportation realizes its mistake and is making plans to rectify it.

    • B. 

      Once they let dogs into restaurants, goats and pigs are sure to follow.

    • C. 

      People without pets are probably mentally healthier than people who have pets.

    • D. 

      Dogs display affection and give their owners a feeling of being loved and cared for.

  • 15. 
    Thanks to television and movies, many people believe that if you want access to someone's hidden or unconscious thoughts, hypnosis will provide it: Put people into a hypnotic trance and presto, you can unlock their deepest secrets. While this view of hypnosis might make for good televised or cinematic drama, it doesn't have much factual support. For one thing, not everyone can be hypnotized. People who are not suggestible and who aren't highly imaginative are all but impossible to hypnotize. Then, too, hypnosis, instead of unlocking the truth, is likely to distort it. That's because people under hypnosis, who are highly suggestible to begin with, become even more suggestible. Tell them that they have been kidnapped as children and they will end up thinking that they have really experienced a kidnapping. In other words, there's a good reason why the courts look with suspicion on testimony given while a person is hypnotized. Such testimony is likely to be based on memories created by the hypnotist rather than the subject.
    • A. 

      People who are suspicious by nature are not good candidates for hypnosis

    • B. 

      People who watch a lot of television are among the easiest to hypnotize because they are used to living in a fantasy world and are ready to believe almost anything, even if the events described are highly unusual, even unbelievable.

    • C. 

      In movies, crime solvers successfully use hypnosis to make people talk about experiences they want to forget or hide; people who watch these movies then think the same thing can happen in reality.

    • D. 

      When suggestible people are hypnotized, they are ready to believe what they are told and this is one reason why some people who come out of a hypnosis session suddenly believe that they were kidnapped by aliens.

  • 16. 
    Jesse slowly made his way into the classroom.  He sat in the back row and put his head down.  Mr. Miser announced that today they were playing a trivia game and the winning students would recieve extra credit. What can you infer?
    • A. 

      Jesse enjoys Mr. Misers class.

    • B. 

      Mr. Miser teaches math.

    • C. 

      Jesse does not like Mr. Miser's class.

    • D. 

      Mr. Miser is Jesse's favorite teacher.

    • E. 

      Both B and C

  • 17. 
    Sally sat down at the dinner table.  Her plate was piled high with her mother's home cooking.  Sally took very small bites and pushed the food around her plate.  Her parents asked how her day was and made small talk.  Sally wished her dog, Bubba, wasn't ouside. What can you infer?
    • A. 

      Sally isn't hungry.

    • B. 

      Sally doesn't like what her mother made for dinner.

    • C. 

      Sally's mother's cooking is aweful.

    • D. 

      All of the above.

  • 18. 
    When a poem's speaker describes beautiful flowers, bright sunshine and a happy childhood, you might conclude that he or she
    • A. 

      Spends a lot of time outside.

    • B. 

      Has a positive outlook on life.

    • C. 

      Writes poems a lot.

    • D. 

      Is unhappy most of the time.

    • E. 

      None of the above

  • 19. 
    Randy walked into his room and discovered that his hamster, Pickled, had croaked.  He cleaned out an old box and carefully placed Pickles inside.  Randy then dug a hole in his backyard and buried the tiny box. Later, he placed a large rock over the mound. What can you infer?
    • A. 

      Randy was happy Pickles finally died because he was getting old.

    • B. 

      Randy knew Pickles was getting ready to die.

    • C. 

      Randy liked Pickles.

    • D. 

      Randy didn't know what to do with a dead hamster.

  • 20. 
    Help Wanted: Young person to work at Cardinal's ballpark.  Some sales experience helpful, but not necessary.  Uniform provided.  Apply at concession stand at the coroner of Broadway and 2nd Ave. The person who takes this job will probably be
    • A. 

      A major league baseball player.

    • B. 

      An usher.

    • C. 

      A ticket salesman.

    • D. 

      A hot dog vendor.

    • E. 

      Non of the above.

  • 21. 
    Jill hands were trembling and sweat ran down her back. Her face was red and she could feel her ears turning pink, too.  Jill grabbed her speech and walked on stage.  She smiled at the audience. What can you infer?
    • A. 

      Jill has to give a speech.

    • B. 

      Jill is nervous.

    • C. 

      Jill was prepared.

    • D. 

      All of the above.

    • E. 

      None of the above.

  • 22. 
    Jim spends most of his time staring at the cement walls.  He wishes he would have done things differently.  Jim hates the meals he is served.  He also hates having to wear the required uniform.  Where is Jim most likely at?
    • A. 

      Construction site

    • B. 

      School

    • C. 

      Jail

    • D. 

      The passage does not have enough information to be sure.