Pathology Quiz: Cell Injury Practice MCQs

24 Questions | Total Attempts: 8890

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Pathology Quiz: Cell Injury Practice MCQs

That’s right, folks. Just like bones, muscles and skin, your cells too can become injured. What do you know about the ins and outs of cell injury, as well as what causes there are and what preventative measures can be taken? Take the following quiz to find out!


Questions and Answers
  • 1. 
     A pathologist notes the following findings after light microscopic examination of a section of liver from a chronic alcoholic. Which of the following is an example of a reversible injury?
    • A. 

      Pyknosis

    • B. 

      Cytoplasmic vacuoles

    • C. 

      Rupture of cell membrane

    • D. 

      Karyolysis

    • E. 

      Karyorrhexis

  • 2. 
     You are asked to review an electron micrograph  of a section of liver from a chronic alcoholic Which of the following is an example of an irreversible injury?
    • A. 

      Cellular edema

    • B. 

      Chromatin clumping

    • C. 

      Cytoplasmic inclusions

    • D. 

      Mitochondrial swelling

    • E. 

      Rupture of cell membrane

  • 3. 
     A patient is admitted with severe substernal chest pain of 4 hours duration. Lab tests reveal an increased level of serum creatine kinase. This is most likely due to:
    • A. 

      Mitochondrial swelling

    • B. 

      Nuclear lysis

    • C. 

      Damage of plasma membranes

    • D. 

      Increased endoplasmic reticulum

    • E. 

      Increased golgi activity

  • 4. 
    • A. 

      Fatty change in liver cells

    • B. 

      Hydropic change of hepatocytes

    • C. 

      Karyolysis in myocardial cells

    • D. 

      Glycogen deposition in hepatocyte nuclei

  • 5. 
    A pathologist notes that a biopsy from the lung of living patients shows the morphologic changes indicative of irreversible injury and cell death. Which of the following is most likely responsible for cell death in a living body? 
    • A. 

      Cytolysis

    • B. 

      Necrosis

    • C. 

      Putrefaction

    • D. 

      Autolysis

    • E. 

      Somatic death

  • 6. 
     You are asked to participate in a research project on myocardial infarctions in a rat model. Which of the following occurs in ischemic cell injury?
    • A. 

      Efflux of K+ and Na+

    • B. 

      Influx of K+ and Ca++

    • C. 

      Influx of K+ and H2O

    • D. 

      Influx of Na+ and Ca++

    • E. 

      Influx of Na+ and K+

  • 7. 
     Cell death causes by autolysis is produced by:
    • A. 

      Antibodies

    • B. 

      Endogenous enzymes

    • C. 

      Phagocytic leukocytes

    • D. 

      Bacterial enzymes

    • E. 

      Anoxia

  • 8. 
     A 10-year-old black man with a known history of sickle cell disease presents to the emergency department complaining of left upper quadrant pain suggestive of a splenic infarct. Microscopic examination of the spleen would most likely reveal:
    • A. 

      Caseous necrosis

    • B. 

      Coagulative necrosis

    • C. 

      Fibrinoid necrosis

    • D. 

      Gangrenous necrosis

    • E. 

      Liquefactive necrosis

  • 9. 
    • A. 

      Early neoplastic change

    • B. 

      Hyaline change

    • C. 

      Patterns of cell death

    • D. 

      Postmortem artefact

    • E. 

      Reversible cell injury

  • 10. 
    •Which of the following is an example of an agent capable of producing a toxic metabolite and indirect chemical injury?
    • A. 

      Alcohol

    • B. 

      Aspirin

    • C. 

      Carbon monoxide

    • D. 

      Mercury poisoning

    • E. 

      Cyanide

  • 11. 
     A circumscribed mass of light yellow crumbly to pasty material associated microscopically with a macrophage response is  characteristic of:
    • A. 

      Caseous necrosis

    • B. 

      Coagulative necrosis

    • C. 

      Fibrinoid necrosis

    • D. 

      Gangrenous necrosis

  • 12. 
     A well-demarcated lesion with increased cytoplasmic eosinophilia, karyolysis, and intact tissue architecture is characteristic of:
    • A. 

      Caseous necrosis

    • B. 

      Enzymatic fat necrosis

    • C. 

      Coagulative necrosis

    • D. 

      Cloudy swelling

    • E. 

      Liquefactive necrosis

  • 13. 
    The pattern of cell death that is characterized by the conversion of a single cell to an acidophilic body, usually with loss of the nucleus but with preservation of its shape to permit recognition of cell boundaries is termed:
    • A. 

      Apoptosis

    • B. 

      Caseous necrosis

    • C. 

      Fibrinoid necrosis

    • D. 

      Liquefactive necrosis

  • 14. 
    • A. 

      Caseous necrosis

    • B. 

      Enzymatic fat necrosis

    • C. 

      Liquefactive necrosis

    • D. 

      Coagulative necrosis

  • 15. 
    Laparoscopic examination of the abdomen was performed on a 50-year-old chronic alcoholic man. The surgeon noted the digestion of tissue with soap formation and calcification. Which of the following is this most likely characteristic of?
    • A. 

      Coagulative necrosis

    • B. 

      Caseous necrosis

    • C. 

      Enzymatic fat necrosis

    • D. 

      Liquefactive necrosi

  • 16. 
     The action of putrefactive bacteria on necrotic tissue results in:
    • A. 

      Coagulation

    • B. 

      Infarction

    • C. 

      Gangrene

    • D. 

      Embolism

    • E. 

      Caseation

  • 17. 
     A well-demarcated area of myocardium appears paler than surrounding tissue and microscopically consists of eosinophilic muscle fibers with only a few karyorrhectic and pyknotic nuclei remaining. Many polys are seen, especially at the margin of this area. The age of the myocardial infarct is most likely:
    • A. 

      2 minutes

    • B. 

      2 hours

    • C. 

      2 days

    • D. 

      2 weeks

    • E. 

      2 months

  • 18. 
    • A. 

      Eosinophilic cytoplasm with cell outlines preserved

    • B. 

      Granular, friable mass of material devoid of cell outlines

    • C. 

      Localized, solid, basophilic lesion with calcification

    • D. 

      Necrosis in which tissue is converted into a fluid

  • 19. 
     Caseous necrosis is characterized morphologically by:
    • A. 

      Preservation of tissue outlines

    • B. 

      Basophilia

    • C. 

      Semi-liquid consistency

    • D. 

      Wedge-shaped periphery

    • E. 

      Amorphous appearance

  • 20. 
     Caseous necrosis is characterized morphologically by:
    • A. 

      Preservation of tissue outlines

    • B. 

      Basophilia

    • C. 

      Semi-liquid consistency

    • D. 

      Wedge-shaped periphery

    • E. 

      Amorphous appearance

  • 21. 
    Which tissue is the most susceptible to liquefactive necrosis following ischemic injury?
    • A. 

      Pancreas

    • B. 

      Liver

    • C. 

      Spleen

    • D. 

      Brain

    • E. 

      Intestine

  • 22. 
     A patient suffers a stroke and has left-sided weakness and paralysis in the upper extremity. The type of necrosis associated with a well-developed infarct of the brain is:
    • A. 

      Coagulative

    • B. 

      Enzymatic fat

    • C. 

      Liquefactive

    • D. 

      Gangrenous

  • 23. 
     A 75-year-old woman has a complaint of shortness of breath and chest pain that radiates to the left shoulder. Serum levels of CK-MB (myocardial creatine kinase) and cardiac muscle troponin I (cTnI) are elevated. Which of the following types of myocardial cell death would best account for these findings?
    • A. 

      Apoptosis

    • B. 

      Caseous necrosis

    • C. 

      Coagulative necrosis

    • D. 

      Fat necrosis

    • E. 

      Liquefactive necrosis

  • 24. 
     Coagulative necrosis usually results from:
    • A. 

      Abscess formation

    • B. 

      Ischemia

    • C. 

      Trauma

    • D. 

      Tuberculosis

    • E. 

      Syphilis