Catcher In The Rye (Second Half)

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Catcher In The Rye (Second Half) - Quiz


This quiz is for English 10 students at EABH based on The Catcher in the Rye.


Questions and Answers
  • 1. 

    Salinger uses the casualness of Holden's narration to present ideas in an organized fashion, yet makes that fashion seem disorganized. What drives Holden's reflection upon how a person should react when he or she wishes to punch someone, as presented at the beginning of chapter 13?

    • A.

      If you're supposed to sock somebody in the jaw, and you sort of feel like doing it, you should do it.

    • B.

      Holden is driven by extreme aggression and passivity.

    • C.

      He thinks about Pencey.

    • D.

      Salinger relies on the streaming consciousness of Holden's tale to provide greater meaning to innocuous events and objects.

    • E.

      He's cold.

    Correct Answer
    D. Salinger relies on the streaming consciousness of Holden's tale to provide greater meaning to innocuous events and objects.
  • 2. 

    Which actions characterize Holden's naivety and innocence after speaking with the pimp in the elevator?

    • A.

      Holden feels sexy.

    • B.

      Holden thinks about stopping when a girl tells him to do so.

    • C.

      Holden fusses about his appearance.

    • D.

      Holden thinks of the prostitute as practice for marriage.

    • E.

      Holden just wants to neck with her.

    Correct Answer
    C. Holden fusses about his appearance.
    Explanation
    Holden fussing about his appearance after speaking with the pimp in the elevator indicates his naivety and innocence. Instead of focusing on the seriousness of the situation or the potential dangers involved, Holden is preoccupied with his physical appearance. This shows his lack of understanding and experience in dealing with such situations, highlighting his innocence and naivety.

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  • 3. 

    The use of what within Holden's narrative style is demonstrated when he says, "I always pick a gorgeous time to fall over a suitcase or something."

    • A.

      Exaggeration

    • B.

      Anecdote

    • C.

      Understatement

    • D.

      Parallelism

    • E.

      Anaphora

    Correct Answer
    A. Exaggeration
    Explanation
    The correct answer is exaggeration because Holden is using hyperbole to emphasize the timing of his clumsiness. By saying he always picks a "gorgeous time" to fall over a suitcase, he is exaggerating the coincidence of his accidents happening at opportune moments. This adds humor and emphasis to his narrative style.

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  • 4. 

    Why does Holden choose to think of the time he sent Allie home as he and a friend went shooting whenever he feels depressed?

    • A.

      Holden is trapped by his own innocence.

    • B.

      When Holden feels depressed, he thinks about shooting people (with his people-shooting hat), and finds comfort in this thought.

    • C.

      Holden always thinks of Allie when he's depressed because Allie was young when he died, and Holden misses him.

    • D.

      Allie was very intelligent, and Holden's ability to perceive the world while being innocent is comforting to him.

    • E.

      Holden wished to protect Allie, and much of Holden's depression stems from an inability to control and protect himself or others.

    Correct Answer
    E. Holden wished to protect Allie, and much of Holden's depression stems from an inability to control and protect himself or others.
    Explanation
    Holden chooses to think of the time he sent Allie home as he and a friend went shooting whenever he feels depressed because he wished to protect Allie, and much of his depression stems from an inability to control and protect himself or others. This memory represents a time when Holden had a sense of responsibility and was able to take care of someone, providing him with a sense of comfort and purpose in the face of his depression.

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  • 5. 

    Using information from outside the novel, support an explanation of why you think Holden likes the madman who cuts himself with stones.

  • 6. 

    Which of the following is NOT a reason that Holden likes the Natural History Museum?

    • A.

      The museum relics that represent living things will always stay exactly as they are.

    • B.

      The person visiting the museum is different each time he or she visits.

    • C.

      He thinks about how everything could be placed in a glass case and stay the same forever.

    • D.

      The teacher and security guard are responsible, but not mean.

    • E.

      They were always able to watch movies and see objects that teach them about their past.

    Correct Answer
    E. They were always able to watch movies and see objects that teach them about their past.
    Explanation
    Holden likes the Natural History Museum because he appreciates the fact that the museum relics representing living things will always remain unchanged. He also enjoys the idea that different people visit the museum each time, bringing a sense of variety. Additionally, he imagines how everything could be preserved in glass cases, remaining the same forever. He finds comfort in the fact that the teacher and security guard are responsible but not mean. However, the statement "They were always able to watch movies and see objects that teach them about their past" is not a reason that Holden likes the museum.

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  • 7. 

    What theme carries over from the end of chapter 16 to the beginning of chapter 17? 

    • A.

      Everything changes

    • B.

      Innocence of youth

    • C.

      Disillusionment of marriage

    • D.

      Loneliness

    • E.

      Children grow

    Correct Answer
    A. Everything changes
    Explanation
    The theme of "Everything changes" carries over from the end of chapter 16 to the beginning of chapter 17. This suggests that there is a shift or transformation happening in the story, possibly indicating a change in the characters' lives or circumstances. It implies that nothing remains the same and that the characters are experiencing some kind of evolution or development.

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  • 8. 

    What difference exists between the way that Sally and Holden see their current impact on the future?

    • A.

      Holden wants to be with Sally, but Sally doesn't really want to be with Holden.

    • B.

      Holden believes that the only way to avoid achieving the maturity that society demands is by running away from society, and Sally believes that they must get married.

    • C.

      Sally wants Holden to finish school so that they can build a family.

    • D.

      Holden believes that he must escape from predestination by avoiding the natural course of his place in society by going to college, while Sally believes she must complete domesticated activities now to ensure that same predestination.

    • E.

      Holden doesn't actually want to be with Sally, but Sally believes that he does.

    Correct Answer
    D. Holden believes that he must escape from predestination by avoiding the natural course of his place in society by going to college, while Sally believes she must complete domesticated activities now to ensure that same predestination.
    Explanation
    Holden and Sally have different perspectives on how to navigate their future and societal expectations. Holden believes that he can avoid the predetermined path set by society by going to college and escaping predestination. On the other hand, Sally believes that she must conform to societal expectations and complete domesticated activities now in order to ensure her place in that same predestined future. Their differing beliefs highlight their contrasting approaches to dealing with societal norms and their individual desires for their future.

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  • 9. 

    Identify a theme that exists within the framework of the movie that Holden watches after he leaves Sally that parallels a theme within Catcher.

  • 10. 

    Why does Holden view the conversation he has with Luce as "intellectual"?

    • A.

      Luce has a very large vocabulary, so the things that they discuss are intellectual.

    • B.

      Holden believes that if he can understand sex and work past the vulgarity of it, then he can move into adulthood without it being a perversion of innocence.

    • C.

      Holden respects Luce and believes that Luce has an understanding of life that escapes Holden.

    • D.

      Luce has a lot of experience with sex, and is able to categorize sexual perversion with ease, which helps him guide Holden into seeing the purity outside of perversion.

    • E.

      Holden is too confused to understand intellectuality.

    Correct Answer
    B. Holden believes that if he can understand sex and work past the vulgarity of it, then he can move into adulthood without it being a perversion of innocence.
    Explanation
    Holden views the conversation he has with Luce as "intellectual" because he believes that by discussing sex and understanding it without perverting innocence, he can transition into adulthood. He sees Luce as someone who has a deep understanding of life and can guide him in seeing the purity outside of sexual perversion. Luce's large vocabulary and experience with sex also contribute to the intellectual nature of their discussions.

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  • 11. 

    Which of the following in chapter 20 does NOT represent Holden's immaturity?

    • A.

      Holden's call to Sally Hayes

    • B.

      Holden's attempt to pick up Valencia, the lounge singer

    • C.

      Holden's visit to the lagoon in Central Park

    • D.

      Holden holding his guts as though he's been shot

    • E.

      Holden's drunkenness

    Correct Answer
    B. Holden's attempt to pick up Valencia, the lounge singer
    Explanation
    Holden's attempt to pick up Valencia, the lounge singer, does not represent his immaturity. This is because trying to pick up someone does not necessarily indicate immaturity, but rather a desire for companionship or attraction. In contrast, Holden's call to Sally Hayes, his visit to the lagoon in Central Park, holding his guts as though he's been shot, and his drunkenness all demonstrate his immaturity.

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  • 12. 

    Why would Holden get a kick out of Phoebe's (or any kid's) notebook? 

    • A.

      Phoebe's notebook is something very private to her, so it acts as a window that reveals the things she keeps secret from the world.

    • B.

      Holden believes that kids should find their identities through exploration of themselves, such as by changing their names and contemplating astrology.

    • C.

      Holden appreciates that the notebook consists of unfiltered thoughts directly as Phoebe thinks them, without pretentiousness or editing.

    • D.

      Phoebe's notebook is not private, as she keeps it on the desk for anyone to see (a large desk that actually belongs to her worldly older brother), revealing her openness to the world.

    • E.

      The notebook chronicles Phoebe's interactions with another student, which further demonstrates her innocence.

    Correct Answer
    C. Holden appreciates that the notebook consists of unfiltered thoughts directly as Phoebe thinks them, without pretentiousness or editing.
    Explanation
    Holden would get a kick out of Phoebe's (or any kid's) notebook because he appreciates that it consists of unfiltered thoughts directly as Phoebe thinks them, without pretentiousness or editing. This aligns with Holden's belief that children should be true to themselves and not conform to societal expectations. The notebook serves as a genuine expression of Phoebe's thoughts and emotions, which Holden finds refreshing and authentic.

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  • 13. 

    Phoebe serves as a source of reason and an important reflection upon Holden's seemingly confusing ideals. Consider death as it has been approached throughout the novel, particularly the conversation about death that Allie, D.B., and Holden have about death in war. Phoebe helps Holden define his perception about life and death when she asks him to think about things he does like. What is important to Holden about death? In responding to this question, mention the alumnus who searches for his name on the can door and James Castle.

  • 14. 

    Holden did not know James Castle well, but in a way he is James Castle. Choose the option of the following that does NOT indicate the psychological connection between Castle and Holden.

    • A.

      James is wearing Holden's sweater when he dies.

    • B.

      Castle dies nobly for an unworthy cause, just as Holden is warned not to do.

    • C.

      Castle holds onto his ideals in the face of personal harm.

    • D.

      Castle and Caulfield are next to each other in the roll.

    • E.

      Castle cares about the purity of innocence in youth, as demonstrated by the visit from his young cousin.

    Correct Answer
    E. Castle cares about the purity of innocence in youth, as demonstrated by the visit from his young cousin.
    Explanation
    The option "Castle cares about the purity of innocence in youth, as demonstrated by the visit from his young cousin" does not indicate the psychological connection between Castle and Holden because it focuses on Castle's concern for the purity of innocence in youth, rather than any similarity or connection between Castle and Holden. The other options, on the other hand, highlight aspects such as Castle wearing Holden's sweater, Castle dying nobly for an unworthy cause like Holden is warned not to do, Castle holding onto his ideals despite personal harm, and Castle and Caulfield being next to each other in the roll, all of which suggest a psychological connection between Castle and Holden.

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  • 15. 

    A symbol that connects everything in this novel together is the song sung by this boy with distracted parents as he walks along a curb. He thinks of this song again, telling Phoebe he'd like to be the catcher in the rye as a job, making sure kids don't fall off of a cliff, to which Phoebe responds is actually a song about bodies meeting bodies, demonstrating the she understands the physicality behind the lyrics better than he does. Find the original words to the Robert Burns poem (search for "coming through the rye burns"). This poem was written long ago and is difficult to understand as many words are blends of Scottish and English. Consider the translations of these words as you attempt to understand the poem: "gin" means "when," "wat" means "wet," "ken" means "know," and "draiglet" means "drags."  Answer this question "How does this song demonstrate Holden's view of innocence?" In your answer, address his ideas about sex, childhood, how this idea alleviates his depression, and the reason for his (psychological) "mishearing" of the lyrics. 

  • 16. 

    Holden talks about Richard Kinsella and the value of digressions with Mr. Antolini. Considering this point along with the way he feels about the scribbling of kids (Phoebe's notebook), which is most likely true in regards to Holden's storytelling and phoniness (which may be different than how we've been led previously in the story). 

    • A.

      Holden is hypocritical. He sees the innocence behind the writings of a girl, despite the fact that she behaves more mature than he does. He remains phony, as he tells a story about a boy who has the same lack of direction in his storytelling that Holden demonstrates in his life.

    • B.

      Holden is not the hypocrite that we believed earlier in the story, as although he may lie on occasion, his lies are not manipulative or for selfish gain, but merely accidental or childish. His lies, and much of his story, mostly consist of digression and the "nice" observations that may be entirely accidental.

    • C.

      Holden is hypocritical, as he continues to lie to himself and everyone around him. He chooses every possibility to mislead others, including himself. When the one teacher who can reach out to him simply touches him upon the head, Holden's own insecurity drives him away from purposeful guidance.

    • D.

      We realize that Holden is not as hypocritical as we believed he was earlier in the story. Although the story of Richard Kinsella is actually a story about Holden himself, he opens himself up to Mr. Antolini the same way that an author would reveal a universal truth through the use of symbolic characters.

    • E.

      Holden digresses frequently throughout the novel, which is the reason he values the stories told by Richard Kinsella. He also values Phoebe's notebook for this same reason, as it reveals a purity that is expressed without a need for the person to be guarded. Although Holden digresses frequently himself, he is guarded in revealing the intimacies of his idealistic philosophies.

    Correct Answer
    B. Holden is not the hypocrite that we believed earlier in the story, as although he may lie on occasion, his lies are not manipulative or for selfish gain, but merely accidental or childish. His lies, and much of his story, mostly consist of digression and the "nice" observations that may be entirely accidental.
    Explanation
    Holden is not the hypocrite that we believed earlier in the story, as although he may lie on occasion, his lies are not manipulative or for selfish gain, but merely accidental or childish. This is supported by the fact that he sees the innocence behind the writings of a girl, despite her behaving more maturely than he does. Additionally, Holden values digressions in storytelling, which aligns with his own tendency to digress frequently throughout the novel. Overall, Holden's lies and storytelling are characterized by digression and accidental observations, rather than intentional manipulation or phoniness.

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  • 17. 

    Holden is disturbed by the "Fuck you" signs written at the school and in the museum. What does he realize about these signs that he should extend to his understanding of children in general?

    • A.

      Holden realizes that it would be impossible to rub out all of the vulgarity in the world, which should lead him to realize that children cannot always be protected and shielded from the bad things in the world - they will all grow up and lose their innocence.

    • B.

      Holden realizes that it would be impossible to rub out all of the vulgarity in the world, which should lead him to realize that children are all corrupted in some form anyway, and that no one can be a catcher in the rye forever.

    • C.

      Holden realizes that it would be impossible to rub out all of the vulgarity in the world, which should lead him to realize that the purity and innocence that is found in childhood is only understood again once a person nears death.

    • D.

      Holden realizes that he is the symbolic writer of "Fuck you" signs around the world. Despite his attempts to keep everyone pure, he seeks out the very perversion that he wishes didn't exist.

    • E.

      Holden realizes that he is the symbolic eraser of "Fuck you" signs around the world. Even though he cannot erase all of them, he has a duty to the children of the world to keep them from the perverse realities of adulthood.

    Correct Answer
    A. Holden realizes that it would be impossible to rub out all of the vulgarity in the world, which should lead him to realize that children cannot always be protected and shielded from the bad things in the world - they will all grow up and lose their innocence.
    Explanation
    Holden realizes that it would be impossible to rub out all of the vulgarity in the world, which should lead him to realize that children cannot always be protected and shielded from the bad things in the world - they will all grow up and lose their innocence. This understanding challenges his belief that he can be the "catcher in the rye" and protect children from the corrupting influences of adulthood. He comes to accept the inevitability of the loss of innocence and the harsh realities of the world, leading to his own personal growth and development.

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  • 18. 

    Why might Holden not want for Phoebe to go with him when she shows up with her suitcase?

    • A.

      Holden doesn't want for Phoebe to miss the play. He believes she could be a great actress, who is without phoniness.

    • B.

      If he has to raise Phoebe, he'll be forced into phoniness, since he wants to avoid society.

    • C.

      Holden believes that Phoebe will stay innocent forever if she simply stays in school and continues her life as she is supposed to.

    • D.

      Holden realizes that Phoebe would be worse off if she traveled with Holden, because Holden doesn't have good experience raising children, even though he likes to think of himself as the catcher in the rye.

    • E.

      Holden realizes that Phoebe would be worse off by trying to escape her reality as he is attempting to do for himself. As much as he wants to keep her from the world, he knows growth is something she must experience.

    Correct Answer
    E. Holden realizes that Phoebe would be worse off by trying to escape her reality as he is attempting to do for himself. As much as he wants to keep her from the world, he knows growth is something she must experience.
    Explanation
    Holden realizes that Phoebe would be worse off by trying to escape her reality as he is attempting to do for himself. He understands that although he wants to protect her from the world, she needs to go through her own experiences in order to grow. Holden recognizes that shielding Phoebe from the challenges of life would prevent her from developing and becoming a stronger individual. He ultimately wants what is best for her, even if it means allowing her to face the difficulties of the world.

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  • 19. 

    What is it that Holden realizes as he watches Phoebe, in his "damn near bawling" happiness, as she rides the carousel (consider his statement, "The thing with kids is, if they want to grab the gold ring, you have to let them do it, and not say anything. If they fall off they fall off, but it's bad if you say anything to them.")?

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