Brain And Behavior - Language

16 Questions

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Brain And Behavior - Language

The human brain has different parts that are responsible for different functions. In our study of the human brain we got to understand how it is connected to speech and language. The quiz below is designed to test just how much of that you understood. Take it up and good luck!


Questions and Answers
  • 1. 
    Which of the following is a primary disturbance in comprehension or production of speech that is caused by brain damage?
    • A. 

      Alexia

    • B. 

      Dysgraphia

    • C. 

      Aphasia

    • D. 

      Agraphia

    • E. 

      Autism

  • 2. 
    Speech starts with decisions as to what will be said and can involve our current or past perceptions. The brain regions that are responsible for having something to say would be those located
    • A. 

      In the primary motor cortex

    • B. 

      Distal to the hippocampus

    • C. 

      In the posterior portions of the occipital, temporal, and parietal lobes.

    • D. 

      On either side of the corpus callosum

    • E. 

      In the anterior portions of the cerebral hemispheres

  • 3. 
    People with Broca's aphasia have trouble
    • A. 

      Writing words on paper

    • B. 

      Spelling simple words

    • C. 

      Understanding speech

    • D. 

      Producing speech

    • E. 

      Recognizing the emotional content of speech

  • 4. 
    People with Broca's aphasia have the most difficulty with
    • A. 

      Spelling content words

    • B. 

      Saying function words

    • C. 

      Reading a map

    • D. 

      Recognizing complex geometrical forms

    • E. 

      Saying content words

  • 5. 
    • A. 

      Portions of the Planum temporale

    • B. 

      Left posterior cerebral cortex

    • C. 

      The arcuate fasciculus

    • D. 

      Inferior right frontal lobe

    • E. 

      Inferior left frontal lobe

  • 6. 
    A person who has difficulties in the use of word order, use of function words, and selection of appropriate word endings would be said to have
    • A. 

      Averbia

    • B. 

      Ansomnia

    • C. 

      Agrammatism

    • D. 

      Articulation disorder

    • E. 

      Anomia

  • 7. 
    A primary characteristic of Wernicke's aphasia is
    • A. 

      Effortless production of meaningless speech

    • B. 

      Fumbling for the right word

    • C. 

      Labored and nonfluent speech

    • D. 

      Speech that lacks rhythm and tone

    • E. 

      Mutism

  • 8. 
    Wernicke's aphasia is caused by damage to
    • A. 

      The frontal association cortex of the right hemisphere

    • B. 

      Broca's area and the caudate nucleus

    • C. 

      The superior temporal gyrus of the left hemisphere

    • D. 

      The inferior occipital gyrus of the right hemisphere

    • E. 

      The left parietal lobe

  • 9. 
    A person with pure word deafness is unable to
    • A. 

      Comprehend speech

    • B. 

      Read lips

    • C. 

      Speak

    • D. 

      Understand non-speech words

    • E. 

      Hear

  • 10. 
    A person who sustains damage to the ------- will be unable to -------.
    • A. 

      Arcuate fasciculus; repeat non-words

    • B. 

      Posterior commissure; name objects

    • C. 

      Arcuate fasciculus; comprehend speech

    • D. 

      Right temporal pole; produce fluent, spontaneous speech

    • E. 

      Right temporal pole; name objects

  • 11. 
    Someone with conduction aphasia is unable to
    • A. 

      Name proper nouns

    • B. 

      Repeat nonwords

    • C. 

      Repeat words that have familiar meanings

    • D. 

      Name objects

    • E. 

      Produce fluent, spontaneous speech

  • 12. 
    A direct neural connection between Broca's area and Wernicke's area is provided by the
    • A. 

      Stria teminalis

    • B. 

      Anterior commissure

    • C. 

      Corpus callosum

    • D. 

      Fornix

    • E. 

      Arcuate fasciculus

  • 13. 
    A person that has pure alexia
    • A. 

      Cannot read, but can recognize words spelled aloud

    • B. 

      Is unable to write

    • C. 

      Would also have agraphia

    • D. 

      Is usually unable to choose appropriate words

    • E. 

      Suffers from a pure form of aphasia

  • 14. 
    A key difference between visual agnosia and pure alexia is that
    • A. 

      A person with visual agnosia can still read

    • B. 

      Alexia disrupts spelling but not reading

    • C. 

      Pure alexia impairs the ability to recognize objects

    • D. 

      A person with visual agnosia is unable to read

    • E. 

      Pure alexia impairs the ability to name objects

  • 15. 
    Pure alexia is produced by damage to pathways that carry ------ information to the -------.
    • A. 

      Auditory; Broca's area

    • B. 

      Visual; right extrastriate cortex

    • C. 

      Visual; left extrastriate cortex

    • D. 

      Auditory; right striate cortex

    • E. 

      Auditory; Wernicke's area

  • 16. 
    Individuals with surface dyslexia
    • A. 

      Cannot read

    • B. 

      Have a deficit in whole-word reading

    • C. 

      Cannot understand the meaning of words

    • D. 

      Cannot recognize individual letters

    • E. 

      Cannot sound out words