Are You Ready For The AP Lang Final?

57 Questions | Total Attempts: 283

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AP Quizzes & Trivia

For AP Language 11 there is a quiz on all the terms we learned called tool box words. In this quiz you study for the final as well as get an idea of how well you might do with our current knowledge. TRY to get an A. . . GOOD LUCK!


Questions and Answers
  • 1. 
    An Aphorism is a...
    • A. 

      A device that uses story/characters symbolically to represent an abstraction in addition to the literal meaning.

    • B. 

      Terse statement of known authorship which expresses a general truth or a moral principle.

    • C. 

      A direct or indirect reference to something which is presumably commonly known, such as an event, book, myth, place, or work of art.

    • D. 

      A grammatical unit that contains both a subject and a verb.

    • E. 

      A fanciful expression, usually in the form of an extended metaphor or surprising analogy between seemingly dissimilar objects.

  • 2. 
    A grammatical unit that contains both a subject and a verb
  • 3. 
    Conotation is...
    • A. 

      A similarity or comparison between two different things or the relationship between them.

    • B. 

      The repetition of sounds, especially initial consonant sounds in two or more neighboring words (as in “she sells sea shells”).

    • C. 

      The non-literal, associative meaning of a word; the implied, suggested meaning.

    • D. 

      The word, phrase, or clause referred to by a pronoun

  • 4. 
    A(n) ______________ is the device of using character and/or story elements symbolically to represent an abstraction in addition to the literal meaning.
  • 5. 
    A figure of speech that directly addresses an absent or imaginary person or a personified abstraction, such as liberty or love.
    • A. 

      Apostrophe

    • B. 

      Conotation

    • C. 

      Satire

    • D. 

      Clause

    • E. 

      Rhetoric

  • 6. 
    Alluision is...
    • A. 

      A figure of speech that directly addresses an absent or imaginary person or a personified abstraction, such as liberty or love

    • B. 

      A terse statement of known authorship which expresses a general truth or a moral principle.

    • C. 

      A similarity or comparison between two different things or the relationship between them.

    • D. 

      A direct or indirect reference to something which is presumably commonly known, such as an event, book, myth, place, or work of art

  • 7. 
    The strict, literal, dictionary definition of a word, devoid of any emotion, attitude, or color.
    • A. 

      Conotation

    • B. 

      Denotation

    • C. 

      Alliteration

    • D. 

      Extended Metaphor

    • E. 

      Figurative

  • 8. 
    A similarity or comparison between two different things or the relationship between them.
    • A. 

      Anecdote

    • B. 

      Euphenism

    • C. 

      Analogy

    • D. 

      Diction

  • 9. 
    The use of slang or informalities in speech or writing. Not generally acceptable for formal writing, colloquialisms give a work a conversational, familiar tone
  • 10. 
    The word, phrase, or clause referred to by a pronoun.
  • 11. 
    Ambiguity is...
    • A. 

      The multiple meanings, either intentional or unintentional, of a word, phrase, sentence, or passage.

    • B. 

      A figure of speech using deliberate exaggeration or overstatement.

    • C. 

      A fanciful expression, usually in the form of an extended metaphor or surprising analogy between seemingly dissimilar objects.

    • D. 

      A metaphor developed at great length, occurring frequently in or throughout a work.

  • 12. 
    Are you cheating?
    • A. 

      Noooo? ok yes

    • B. 

      Never!

    • C. 

      Cheating on what

    • D. 

      How'd you know??

  • 13. 
    __________ is  the sensory details or figurative language used to describe, arouse emotion, or represent abstractions.
    • A. 

      Sensory Details

    • B. 

      Imagery

    • C. 

      Analogy

    • D. 

      Genre

  • 14. 
    What is an Euphenism?
    • A. 

      The multiple meanings, either intentional or unintentional, of a word, phrase, sentence, or passage.

    • B. 

      This term describes traditions for each genre.

    • C. 

      A device used to produce figurative language.

    • D. 

      From the Greek for "good speech," ___________ are a more agreeable or less offensive substitute for a generally unpleasant word or concept.

    • E. 

      A word?

  • 15. 
    Writing or speech that is not intended to carry literal meaning and is usually meant to be imaginative and vivid.
  • 16. 
    The major category into which a literary work fits.
  • 17. 
    Describe Diction
    • A. 

      The non-literal, associative meaning of a word; the implied, suggested meaning.

    • B. 

      Related to style, _______ refers to the writer's word choices, pecially with regard to their correctness, clearness, or effectiveness

    • C. 

      The strict, literal, dictionary definition of a word, devoid of any emotion, attitude, or color.

    • D. 

      From the Greek, _________ literally means "teaching."

  • 18. 
    From the Greek, __________ literally means "teaching."
    • A. 

      Homily

    • B. 

      Figure of speech

    • C. 

      Didactic

    • D. 

      Denotation

  • 19. 
    A figure of speech using deliberate exaggeration or overstatement.
    • A. 

      Understatement

    • B. 

      Hyperbole

    • C. 

      Irony

    • D. 

      Figurative Language

  • 20. 
    Define Homily
    • A. 

      This term literally means "sermon," but more informally, it can include any serious talk, speech, or lecture involving moral or spiritual advice

    • B. 

      The multiple meanings, either intentional or unintentional, of a word, phrase, sentence, or passage.

    • C. 

      This term describes traditions for each genre.

    • D. 

      A similarity or comparison between two different things or the relationship between them

  • 21. 
    A device used to produce figurative language.
  • 22. 
    A metaphor developed at great length, occurring frequently in or throughout a work.
  • 23. 
    This term describes traditions for each genre.
    • A. 

      Genre

    • B. 

      Conotation

    • C. 

      Generic Conventions

    • D. 

      Prose

  • 24. 
    Also referred to as parallel construction or parallel structure, this term comes from Greek roots meaning "beside one another."
  • 25. 
    A term from the Greek meaning “changed label” or “Substitute name”. A figure of speech in which the name of one object is substituted for that of another closely associated with it.
    • A. 

      Irony

    • B. 

      Metonymy

    • C. 

      Didactic

    • D. 

      Parallelism

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