AP Review Quiz Chapter 10

25 Questions | Total Attempts: 178

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AP Quizzes & Trivia

Questions and Answers
  • 1. 
    In general, the U.S. places ________________ restrictions on its media than either France or Great Britain.
    • A. 

      Many more

    • B. 

      Slightly more

    • C. 

      About the same number of

    • D. 

      Fewer

    • E. 

      More significant

  • 2. 
    An innovative news establishment set up in 1848 to provide systematic dissemination of news to publications of different political persuasions was the
    • A. 

      Ticker tape.

    • B. 

      Pony Express.

    • C. 

      Associated Press (AP).

    • D. 

      Washington Globe.

    • E. 

      Rider's Club.

  • 3. 
    A war between the U.S. and Spain was fomented by the publisher
    • A. 

      William Randolph Hearst.

    • B. 

      Rupert Murdoch.

    • C. 

      Eugene Pulliam.

    • D. 

      Theodore Loeb.

    • E. 

      Christopher Donnell.

  • 4. 
    The term yellow journalism was coined to describe media sensationalism in what era?
    • A. 

      The early days of the republic.

    • B. 

      The time of the Civil War.

    • C. 

      The turn of the century (19th to 20th)

    • D. 

      Post World War II

    • E. 

      The Great Depression

  • 5. 
    The term muckraker was first used in a political sense by
    • A. 

      Theodore Roosevelt.

    • B. 

      Calvin Coolidge.

    • C. 

      Herbert Hoover.

    • D. 

      Franklin Roosevelt.

    • E. 

      James Garfield.

  • 6. 
    The mass media are not a true mirror of reality because
    • A. 

      Reporters are more conservative than the general public.

    • B. 

      The news emphasizes sensational events and ignores positive social trends.

    • C. 

      A process of selection, editing, and emphasis exists in news reporting.

    • D. 

      The media tend to emphasize national events and issues over the local ones.

    • E. 

      The media tend to emphasize local events and issues over national ones.

  • 7. 
    Of the different sectors of the media in the U.S., that of major city newspapers is probably the
    • A. 

      Most trusted.

    • B. 

      Least trusted.

    • C. 

      Least competitive.

    • D. 

      Most competitive.

    • E. 

      Most accurate.

  • 8. 
    Though things are changing, to a remarkable degree, media ownership in the U.S. is
    • A. 

      International.

    • B. 

      National.

    • C. 

      Regional.

    • D. 

      Local.

    • E. 

      Governmental.

  • 9. 
    Two local papers that have gained national readerships are
    • A. 

      The Wall Street Journal and the New York Times.

    • B. 

      The New York Times & USA Today.

    • C. 

      The New York Times and the Los Angeles Times.

    • D. 

      The Wall Street Journal & the Los Angeles Times.

    • E. 

      The New York Times & the Christian Science Monitor.

  • 10. 
    Compared with local journalists, reporters and editors for the national media are more
    • A. 

      Conservative

    • B. 

      Liberal

    • C. 

      Restricted in what they can write.

    • D. 

      Likely to act as gatekeepers and less likely to act as scorekeepers.

    • E. 

      Critical of the presidency.

  • 11. 
    The television weekly 60 Minutes runs a segment on the role of local politicians in the drug trade. The issue soon becomes the subject of national debate. In this role 60 Minutes is acting as
    • A. 

      Gatekeeper

    • B. 

      Scorekeeper

    • C. 

      Watchdog

    • D. 

      Investigator

    • E. 

      B & C

  • 12. 
    ABC news declares one presidential candidate the winner in a televised debate. In this role, ABC News is acting as
    • A. 

      Gatekeeper.

    • B. 

      Scorekeeper.

    • C. 

      Watchdog.

    • D. 

      Investigator.

    • E. 

      C & D.

  • 13. 
    The New York Times publishes an article accusing a Texas senator of using his power to extract contributions from oil industry executives. In this role, the Times is acting as
    • A. 

      Gatekeeper.

    • B. 

      Scorekeeper.

    • C. 

      Watchdog.

    • D. 

      Sounding board.

    • E. 

      Adjudicator.

  • 14. 
    Which amendment to the U.S. Constitution prevents the government from censoring the media?
    • A. 

      The First

    • B. 

      The Fifth

    • C. 

      The Sixth

    • D. 

      The Twenty-Seventh

    • E. 

      None of the Above

  • 15. 
    For a newspaper to be found guilty of libel, the accused party must
    • A. 

      Prove beyond a reasonable doubt that what was printed was damaging, even if it was printed accidentally.

    • B. 

      Sue the reporter who wrote the story and not the newspaper that published it.

    • C. 

      Sue the newspaper that published the story and not the reporter who wrote it.

    • D. 

      Provide clear and convincing evidence that what was printed was malicious

    • E. 

      Establish that what was printed could have been interpreted in more than one manner.

  • 16. 
    In general, what position has the Supreme Court taken on the government's right to compel reporters to divulge information concerning the commission of a crime?
    • A. 

      It has ruled against it.

    • B. 

      It has upheld it.

    • C. 

      It has avoided ruling on it.

    • D. 

      It has yet to rule on it.

    • E. 

      It has ruled in a contradictory manner.

  • 17. 
    Until it was abolished in 1987, what obligated broadcasters to present contrasting sides of controversial public issues?
    • A. 

      The right of reply rule.

    • B. 

      The Communications Act of 1974.

    • C. 

      The fairness doctrine.

    • D. 

      The equal time rule.

    • E. 

      The respondent superior doctrine.

  • 18. 
    The content of radio and television broadcasts is regulated in ways that newspapers and magazines are not. For example, broadcasters are required by law to
    • A. 

      Sell equal time to all candidates.

    • B. 

      Allow individuals the right to reply to an attack that occurred on a regular news program.

    • C. 

      Allow a candidate to petition for a station's endorsement.

    • D. 

      Present contrasting sides of controversial public issues.

    • E. 

      Produce public debates and forums for the discussion of current issues.

  • 19. 
    A process that limits short-term effect of radio & television on voters is one that psychologists call
    • A. 

      Burnout.

    • B. 

      Stimulus-response acceleration.

    • C. 

      Anticipatory apathy.

    • D. 

      The iterative factor.

    • E. 

      Selective attention.

  • 20. 
    Compared with other Western nations, the U.S. media play a much more important role in
    • A. 

      Voicing the official government line.

    • B. 

      Personalizing our leaders.

    • C. 

      Reflecting the political agenda of the elite.

    • D. 

      Dealing with critical issues.

    • E. 

      Solving social problems.

  • 21. 
    According to recent polls, most Americans claim to get most of their news from 
    • A. 

      Magazines of opinion.

    • B. 

      Local newspapers

    • C. 

      National newspapers (e.g., the New York TImes).

    • D. 

      National newsweeklies (e.g., Time)

    • E. 

      Television.

  • 22. 
    Compared to the average citizen, members of the national media are
    • A. 

      Far more conservative.

    • B. 

      Somewhat more conservative.

    • C. 

      Somewhat more liberal.

    • D. 

      Far more liberal.

    • E. 

      More moderate.

  • 23. 
    The type of new story that is most likely to raise the question of the source's motive is the
    • A. 

      Routine story.

    • B. 

      Selected story.

    • C. 

      Insider story.

    • D. 

      Local story.

    • E. 

      Predicated story.

  • 24. 
    The source of a background story is typically
    • A. 

      One of the wire services (AP, UP, Reuters).

    • B. 

      Not identified by name.

    • C. 

      The president's press secretary.

    • D. 

      The president.

    • E. 

      The president's chief of staff.

  • 25. 
    Among the weapons that the government uses to constrain journalists is the
    • A. 

      Threat of the government's revoking of journalist's license.

    • B. 

      Enforcement of the Freedom of Information Reform Act of 1976.

    • C. 

      Need for journalists to stay on good terms with their inside sources of information.

    • D. 

      Threat that press officers will bypass the local media and reach the national media directly.

    • E. 

      The Supreme Court's ruling in Chaplinsky v. New Hampshire.

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