Cls - Lesson 3: Opening & Managing A Casualty's Airway

13 Questions | Total Attempts: 63

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Lesson Quizzes & Trivia

AR CLS lesson 3 for opening and managing a casualty's airway.


Questions and Answers
  • 1. 
    You find a soldier who appears to be unconscious. Which of the following should be your first action in rendering aid to this person?
    • A. 

      Check his pulse.

    • B. 

      Call out, "Are you okay?" and gently shake his shoulder.

    • C. 

      Begin inserting a nasopharyngeal airway.

    • D. 

      Open his airway.

    • E. 

      Begin performing mouth-to mouth resuscitation.

  • 2. 
    You are going to check the casualty to see if he is breathing. How should you position the casualty?
    • A. 

      On his back.

    • B. 

      On his stomach.

    • C. 

      On his right side.

    • D. 

      On his left side.

  • 3. 
    Which method of opening the airway is preferred if you believe that the casualty has an injured neck or spine?
    • A. 

      Head-tilt/chin-lift.

    • B. 

      Jaw thrust.

  • 4. 
    In the head-tilt/chin-lift method of opening a casualty's airway, one hand is used to press on his forehead. How is the thumb on the opposite hand used?
    • A. 

      Lift the casualty's chin by hooking the thumb under the casualty's jaw.

    • B. 

      Hook over the casualty's bottom teeth to ensure a good grip on his chin.

    • C. 

      Press against the casualty's nose to seal off his nostrils.

    • D. 

      Keep the casualty's lower lip depressed, if needed.

  • 5. 
    When performing the head-tilt/chin-lift method of opening a casualty's airway, you __________ allow your fingers to press deeply in the soft tissues under the chin.
  • 6. 
    When performing a jaw thrust on a casualty lying on the ground, your elbows should be resting on the:
    • A. 

      Casualty's chest.

    • B. 

      Casualty's abdomen.

    • C. 

      Ground.

  • 7. 
    When rolling a casualty, one of your hands is used to support the casualty's head and neck. What should you do with the other hand.
    • A. 

      Reach across the casualty's chest, grab under the casualty's arm, and pull the casualty toward you.

    • B. 

      Place your hand under the casualty's side that is nearest to you and push the casualty away from you.

  • 8. 
    When you check for breathing, you should:
    • A. 

      Watch the casualty's chest to see if it rises and falls.

    • B. 

      Listen for sounds of breathing.

    • C. 

      Feel for any exhaled breath blowing against your face.

    • D. 

      Do all of the above.

  • 9. 
    What are three indicators that a nasopharyngeal airway should be inserted?
  • 10. 
    Normally, the nasopharyngeal tube is inserted into the casualty's _______ nostril.
    • A. 

      Left

    • B. 

      Right

  • 11. 
    You are inserting a nasopharyngeal tube into the casualty's nostril when resistance is met. What should you do?
    • A. 

      Continue inserting the tube.

    • B. 

      Begin twisting the tube so that it slides around the blockage.

    • C. 

      Remove the tube and insert it into the nostril again.

    • D. 

      Remove the tube and insert it into the other nostril.

    • E. 

      Remove the tube and begin cardiopulmonary resuscitation.

  • 12. 
    Upon successfully inserting a nasopharyngeal airway, the flange of the airway should be:
    • A. 

      Inserted as far as possible into the casualty's nostril.

    • B. 

      Against the outer part of the casualty's nostril.

    • C. 

      About half an inch from the outside of the casualty's nostril.

    • D. 

      About an inch from the outside of the casualty's nostril.

  • 13. 
    You have inserted a nasopharyngeal airway. How should you position the casualty?
    • A. 

      On his back.

    • B. 

      On his stomach.

    • C. 

      On his side.

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