Romeo And Juliet Quotes

18 Questions

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Romeo And Juliet Quotes

Find out how much you know about the classic Romeo and Juliet with this quiz! No cheating!


Questions and Answers
  • 1. 
    Servant to Romeo, he witnesses the final moments of Romeo's life at the churchyard from a hiding place. He later backs up Friar Laurence's explanation of events to Escalus, Prince of Verona.
    • A. 

      Balthasar

    • B. 

      Escalus

    • C. 

      Peter

    • D. 

      Friar Lawrence

  • 2. 
    The Prince of Verona, his continued annoyance with the ongoing feud between the Capulet and Montague families leads him to warn both families that further fighting between the two will be punished by death. Escalus is also responsible for banishing Romeo from Verona after Romeo killed Tybalt, an act of mercy on the Prince's part. At the end of the play when both Romeo and Juliet are dead, Escalus tells the two grieving families they are largely to blame for this tragedy in addition to his own lack of intervention to stop the Capulet / Montague feud... (Lines 281-295)
    • A. 

      Lord Capulet

    • B. 

      Escalus

    • C. 

      Friar John

    • D. 

      Balthasar

  • 3. 
    Romeo’s father, the patriarch of the Montague clan and bitter enemy of Capulet. At the beginning of the play, he is chiefly concerned about Romeo’s melancholy
    • A. 

      Lord Capulet

    • B. 

      Lord Montague

    • C. 

      Benvolio

    • D. 

      Tybalt

  • 4. 
    The wife of Montague, she worries about her son's happiness in Act I, Scene I. Later she dies, grief stricken that her son was banished from Verona. "Grief of my son's exile hath stopp'd her breath" Montague later explains (Act V, Scene III, Line 211).
    • A. 

      Juliet

    • B. 

      The Nurse

    • C. 

      Lady Capulet

    • D. 

      Lady Montague

  • 5. 
    The patriarch of the Capulet family, father of Juliet, husband of Lady Capulet, and enemy, for unexplained reasons, of Montague. He truly loves his daughter, though he is not well acquainted with Juliet’s thoughts or feelings, and seems to think that what is best for her is a “good” match with Paris. Often prudent, he commands respect and propriety, but he is liable to fly into a rage when either is lacking.
    • A. 

      Lord Montague

    • B. 

      Lord Capulet

  • 6. 
    Juliet’s mother, Capulet’s wife. A woman who herself married young (by her own estimation she gave birth to Juliet at close to the age of fourteen), she is eager to see her daughter marry Paris. She is an ineffectual mother, relying on the Nurse for moral and pragmatic support.
    • A. 

      Lady Montague

    • B. 

      Lady Capulet

  • 7. 
     the woman who breast-fed Juliet when she was a baby and has cared for Juliet her entire life. A vulgar, long-winded, and sentimental character.faithful confidante and loyal intermediary in Juliet’s affair with Romeo. She provides a contrast with Juliet, given that her view of love is earthy and sexual, whereas Juliet is idealistic and intense. believes in love and wants Juliet to have a nice-looking husband, but the idea that Juliet would want to sacrifice herself for love is incomprehensible to her.
    • A. 

      Rosaline

    • B. 

      Friar Lawrence

    • C. 

      Benvolio

    • D. 

      The Nurse

  • 8. 
    A Capulet servant who invites guests to Capulet’s feast and escorts the Nurse to meet with Romeo. He is illiterate, and a bad singer.
    • A. 

      Friar John

    • B. 

      Peter

    • C. 

      Paris

    • D. 

      Romeo

  • 9. 
    A Franciscan friar, friend to both Romeo and Juliet. Kind, civic-minded, a proponent of moderation, and always ready with a plan, He secretly marries the impassioned lovers in hopes that the union might eventually bring peace to Verona. As well as being a Catholic holy man, He is also an expert in the use of seemingly mystical potions and herbs.
    • A. 

      Friar Tybalt

    • B. 

      Friar John

    • C. 

      Friar Lawrence

    • D. 

      Queen Mab

  • 10. 
    A Franciscan friar charged  with taking the news of Juliet’s false death to Romeo in Mantua. He  is held up in a quarantined house, and the message never reaches Romeo.
    • A. 

      Friar John

    • B. 

      Friar Tybalt

    • C. 

      Friar Lawrence

    • D. 

      Friar Paris

  • 11. 
    A kinsman to the Prince, and Romeo’s close friend. One of the most extraordinary characters in all of Shakespeare’s plays, he overflows with imagination, wit, and, at times, a strange, biting satire and brooding fervor.He loves wordplay, especially sexual double entendres. He can be quite hotheaded, and hates people who are affected, pretentious, or obsessed with the latest fashions. He finds Romeo’s romanticized ideas about love tiresome, and tries to convince Romeo to view love as a simple matter of sexual appetite.
    • A. 

      Lawrence

    • B. 

      Romeo

    • C. 

      Benvolio

    • D. 

      Mercutio

  • 12. 
    Montague’s nephew, Romeo’s cousin and thoughtful friend, he makes a genuine effort to defuse violent scenes in public places, though Mercutio accuses him of having a nasty temper in private. He spends most of the play trying to help Romeo get his mind off Rosaline, even after Romeo has fallen in love with Juliet.
    • A. 

      Paris

    • B. 

      Benvolio

    • C. 

      Tybalt

    • D. 

      Peter

  • 13. 
    The son and heir of Montague and Lady Montague.
    • A. 

      Benvolio

    • B. 

      Mercutio

    • C. 

      Romeo

    • D. 

      Peter

  • 14. 
    The daughter of Capulet and Lady Capulet.
    • A. 

      Queen Mab

    • B. 

      Juliet

    • C. 

      Rosaline

    • D. 

      The Nurse

  • 15. 
    A kinsman of the Prince, and the suitor of Juliet most preferred by Capulet. Once Capulet has promised him he can marry Juliet, he behaves very presumptuous toward her, acting as if they are already married.
    • A. 

      John

    • B. 

      Tybalt

    • C. 

      Paris

    • D. 

      Lawrence

  • 16. 
    A Capulet, Juliet’s cousin on her mother’s side. Vain, fashionable, supremely aware of courtesy and the lack of it, he becomes aggressive, violent, and quick to draw his sword when he feels his pride has been injured. Once drawn, his sword is something to be feared. He loathes Montagues.
    • A. 

      Paris

    • B. 

      Tybalt

    • C. 

      Benvolio

    • D. 

      Mercutio

  • 17. 
    The woman with whom Romeo is infatuated at the beginning of the play. She never appears onstage, but it is said by other characters that she is very beautiful and has sworn to live a life of chastity.
    • A. 

      Rosaline

    • B. 

      Juliet

    • C. 

      The Nurse

    • D. 

      Queen Mab

  • 18. 
    Fairy Queen who rides through the night on her tiny wagon bringing dreams to sleepers.One of the most noteworthy aspects of she ride is that the dreams she brings generally do not bring out the best sides of the dreamers, but instead serve to confirm them in whatever vices they are addicted to—for example, greed, violence, or lust. Another important aspect of Mercutio’s description of her is that it is complete nonsense, albeit vivid and highly colorful. Nobody believes in a fairy pulled about by “a small grey-coated gnat” whipped with a cricket’s bone (1.4.65).
    • A. 

      Queen Mab

    • B. 

      Juliet

    • C. 

      The Nurse

    • D. 

      Rosaline