Reserved Powers Examples Quiz

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Reserved Powers Examples Quiz - Quiz

This is defined as the power that may be exercised by a head of state without the approval of another branch of government. Unlike in the presidential system of government, the President is constrained by the cabinet or legislature in a parliamentary system. Meaning, before a bill becomes a law, it needs the approval of at least three-fourths of the member of the House of Representatives or the Senate.


Questions and Answers
  • 1. 

    What is another term for reserved powers?

    • A.

      Residual powers

    • B.

      Discretionary powers

    • C.

      Prerogative powers

    • D.

      All of the above

    Correct Answer
    D. All of the above
    Explanation
    The term "reserved powers" refers to powers that are not specifically granted to the federal government in the United States Constitution, and are therefore reserved for the states. "Discretionary powers" are powers that are granted to a person or entity to make decisions based on their own judgment. "Prerogative powers" are powers that are exclusive to a particular person or group. All of these terms refer to different aspects of powers that are not explicitly delegated to the federal government, making "all of the above" the correct answer.

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  • 2. 

    Unlike other constitutional monarchs, who has no reserved powers?

    • A.

      King of Spain

    • B.

      Emperor of Japan

    • C.

      King of Sweden

    • D.

      B & C

    Correct Answer
    D. B & C
    Explanation
    The Emperor of Japan and the King of Sweden are the constitutional monarchs who have no reserved powers. This means that their roles are largely ceremonial and symbolic, with limited or no involvement in the day-to-day governance of their respective countries. In contrast, the King of Spain does have reserved powers, which include the ability to appoint and dismiss the Prime Minister, dissolve the Parliament, and veto legislation.

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  • 3. 

    In Belgium,what should be indicated in a constitutional provision to make an act of the Monarch valid and binding?

    • A.

      Approval of the King

    • B.

      Signature of the members of the government

    • C.

      Royal advice of The Elders

    • D.

      Confirmation of the Queen

    Correct Answer
    B. Signature of the members of the government
    Explanation
    In Belgium, for an act of the Monarch to be valid and binding, it must be indicated in a constitutional provision that it requires the signature of the members of the government. This means that the act must be approved and signed by the members of the government before it can be considered valid and enforceable. The approval and signature of the government members ensure that the act is in line with the democratic principles and decisions made collectively by the government.

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  • 4. 

    Which of the following is a major theoretical personal prerogative of the United Kingdom's Monarch?

    • A.

      To refuse to dissolve a Parliament

    • B.

      To appoint a Prime Minister

    • C.

      To dismiss a Prime Minister

    • D.

      All of the above

    Correct Answer
    D. All of the above
    Explanation
    The United Kingdom's Monarch holds the major theoretical personal prerogative of all the options listed. They have the power to refuse to dissolve a Parliament, meaning they can reject a request to end the current session of Parliament. They also have the authority to appoint a Prime Minister, granting them the ability to choose the leader of the government. Additionally, the Monarch can dismiss a Prime Minister, giving them the power to remove the head of the government from office. Therefore, all of the options mentioned are major theoretical personal prerogatives of the United Kingdom's Monarch.

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  • 5. 

    From what country does this principle exist: " The Queen reigns, but the government rules, so long as it has the support of the House of Representatives."

    • A.

      Australia

    • B.

      Canada

    • C.

      Great Britain

    • D.

      New Zealand

    Correct Answer
    D. New Zealand
    Explanation
    The given principle states that the Queen reigns, but the government rules as long as it has the support of the House of Representatives. This principle is known to exist in New Zealand.

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  • 6. 

    A king could delegate reserved powers or royal prerogative to whom?

    • A.

      Governor General

    • B.

      General of the Army

    • C.

      The Queen

    • D.

      The heirs to the throne

    Correct Answer
    A. Governor General
    Explanation
    The correct answer is Governor General. In a monarchy, the king or queen holds certain powers and responsibilities known as reserved powers or royal prerogative. These powers can be delegated to a representative known as the Governor General. The Governor General acts as the head of state and carries out various duties on behalf of the monarch, such as opening and closing parliament, giving royal assent to legislation, and representing the monarch at official events. By delegating these powers to the Governor General, the king or queen can focus on other matters while still maintaining control over important decisions and actions.

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  • 7. 

    Reserved powers were used on how many occasions in Australia?

    • A.

      Once

    • B.

      Twice

    • C.

      Thrice

    • D.

      None of the above

    Correct Answer
    B. Twice
    Explanation
    Reserved powers were used twice in Australia. This means that there have been two instances in which the reserved powers, which are powers that are not specifically granted to the federal government but are reserved for the states, were invoked in Australia.

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  • 8. 

    Which of the following actions are not part of reserved powers under constitutional monarchy?

    • A.

      To grant pardon

    • B.

      To dismiss a prime minister

    • C.

      To dissolve a parliament

    • D.

      To issue license plates of vehicles

    Correct Answer
    D. To issue license plates of vehicles
    Explanation
    In a constitutional monarchy, the powers of the monarch are limited and defined by the constitution. The actions listed in the question are all examples of reserved powers that typically belong to the monarch. However, issuing license plates of vehicles is not typically considered a reserved power of the monarch in a constitutional monarchy. This task is usually handled by a government agency or department responsible for vehicle registration and licensing.

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