Conditional Sentences Trivia

Reviewed by Juliette Firla
Juliette Firla, MA |
K-12 English Expert
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Juliette is a middle school English teacher at Sacred Heart of Greenwich, Connecticut. Juliette earned a BA in English/Language Arts Teacher Education from Elon University (2016-2020) and an MA in Teaching Writing from Johns Hopkins University (Apr 2023-Dec 2025). She holds a Classroom Teacher license from the Connecticut State Department of Education, obtained in July 2021. Juliette possesses strong skills in English language arts, writing, editing, and literature study. She has a deep passion for working with young people and contributing to the education of America's youth in the classroom.
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| By Ajixbenedictus
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Ajixbenedictus
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Quizzes Created: 13 | Total Attempts: 154,442
Questions: 20 | Viewed: 126,991

1.

If I study, I _______ pass the exam.

Answer: Will
Explanation:
This sentence is an example of the first conditional, which is used to discuss real and possible future events. The structure of the first conditional is "if" + present simple (study) + "will" + base verb (pass). The correct form to complete the sentence is "will," making it read: "If I study, I will pass the exam." This structure indicates a real possibility that passing the exam is contingent on the condition of studying.
2.

If I _____ money, I will buy a new phone.

Answer: Have
Explanation:
This sentence is an example of the first conditional, which is used to discuss real and possible future events. The structure of the first conditional is "if" + present simple (have) + "will" + base verb (buy). The correct form to complete the sentence is "have," making it read: "If I have money, I will buy a new phone." This structure indicates a real possibility that buying a new phone is contingent on the condition of having money.
3.

John will ________ your house if he gets important information for you about the project.

Answer: Go to
Explanation:
This sentence employs the first conditional, used to express a likely future event contingent upon a specific condition being fulfilled. The first conditional typically combines a simple present tense verb in the 'if' clause ("gets" in this case) with a future form (will + base verb) in the main clause. The correct phrase to complete the sentence is "go to," which is grammatically appropriate for indicating movement towards a place, fitting naturally after "will" to maintain the future tense necessary for the first conditional. This usage correctly connects John’s potential action—visiting your house—with the condition of receiving important information, effectively demonstrating how his actions depend on future circumstances.
4.

My mother would not go to my uncle's house if my uncle _______ my mother's call.

Answer: Received
Explanation:
This sentence uses the second conditional, which is intended to discuss hypothetical situations and their potential outcomes. The second conditional typically pairs a past simple verb in the 'if' clause with 'would' plus the base form of the verb in the main clause. The correct form to use in this 'if' clause is "received," which is the past simple tense of "receive." This structure is used to express events that are unlikely to happen or are purely hypothetical. In this context, the use of "received" implies that it's unlikely or hypothetical that the uncle would not answer the call, affecting the mother's decision regarding her visit. This grammatical structure effectively captures scenarios that are speculative or not expected to occur, aligning with the nuanced use of the second conditional to explore less probable circumstances.
5.

If you complete the test perfectly, you _________ a special gift from your parents.

Answer: Will get
Explanation:
This scenario is an example of a first conditional statement, which is used to discuss real and possible future events that are contingent on a specific condition. In the first conditional, the condition clause (starting with "if") employs the simple present tense ("complete"), while the result clause uses "will" plus the base form of the verb ("get") to indicate a future outcome based on the fulfillment of the condition. The correct completion for this sentence is "will get," which properly aligns with the grammar rules of the first conditional. This structure is ideal for stating what will definitively happen if the condition is met, emphasizing the real possibility and practical outcome of completing the test perfectly.
6.

Mr. Benny ______ not continue the lesson if the students in his class were noisy.

Answer: Would
Explanation:
 This sentence is an example of the second conditional, which is used to talk about hypothetical or unlikely situations and their possible outcomes. In the second conditional, the structure is "if" + past simple (were noisy) + "would" + base verb (continue). The correct verb to complete the sentence is "would," making the sentence read: "Mr. Benny would not continue the lesson if the students in his class were noisy." This structure effectively conveys a hypothetical situation where Mr. Benny's decision to continue the lesson is dependent on the behavior of the students, suggesting a condition that is not actually occurring but is being imagined for the sake of discussion.
7.

The soccer goalie from PERSELA, Khoirul Huda, would not be given a red card if he _______ hit other players.

Answer: Did not
Explanation:
This sentence uses the second conditional, which is used to talk about hypothetical situations and their potential outcomes. The structure of the second conditional is "if" + past simple (did not hit) + "would" + base verb (be given). The correct form to complete the sentence is "did not," making the sentence read: "The soccer goalie from PERSELA, Khoirul Huda, would not be given a red card if he did not hit other players." This structure indicates a hypothetical situation where the goalie’s action of not hitting other players would prevent him from receiving a red card.
8.

If I ______ you, I ________ give her a special gift in her birthday party.

Answer: Were - would
Explanation:
This sentence uses the second conditional, which is used to discuss hypothetical or unreal situations and their possible outcomes. The structure of the second conditional is "if" + past simple (were) + "would" + base verb (give). The correct form to complete the sentence is "were - would," making it read: "If I were you, I would give her a special gift at her birthday party." This structure expresses a hypothetical situation (being you) and its possible outcome (giving a special gift). The use of "were" is grammatically correct in this context as it reflects a subjunctive mood, indicating something contrary to fact.
9.

If there ______ a will, there ________ be a way too.

Answer: Is - will
Explanation:
This sentence follows the first conditional structure, used to discuss real and possible future events. The correct form to complete the sentence is "is - will," making it read: "If there is a will, there will be a way too." This phrase means that if someone is determined enough, they will find a solution to any problem. The use of "is" (present simple) in the "if" clause and "will" (future simple) in the main clause fits the grammatical pattern for the first conditional, emphasizing a realistic and possible future outcome based on a present condition.
10.

 If I _____ beautiful and tall, I . . . sign up to be a model.

Answer: Were - would
Explanation:
This sentence uses the second conditional, which is used to discuss hypothetical or unreal situations and their possible outcomes. The structure of the second conditional is "if" + past simple (were) + "would" + base verb (sign up). The correct form to complete the sentence is "were - would," making it read: "If I were beautiful and tall, I would sign up to be a model." The use of "were" is correct here because it reflects a hypothetical situation that is contrary to the current reality, and "would" indicates the potential outcome of that hypothetical situation.
11.

Angel will move this table to another place if you ________ her house tomorrow.

Answer: Come to
Explanation:
This sentence exemplifies a first conditional structure, which is used to discuss real and possible actions or events in the future. In the first conditional, the condition clause ("if" clause) requires the present simple tense to express a situation that might actually occur. Therefore, the phrase "come to" is correct because it adheres to this tense requirement, aligning the verb form with the singular subject "you," which, although singular in form, takes plural verb forms in present tense. The result clause here uses "will" followed by the base form of the verb "move," fitting the pattern for probable future outcomes based on the condition. This structure helps articulate plans or actions dependent on a specific condition being met in the near future.
12.

 If Immanuel ___________ enough money to buy the car, he would . . . gone to the party with you.

Answer: Had - have
Explanation:
 This sentence structure is indicative of the third conditional, which is used to discuss hypothetical situations in the past and their possible outcomes, which also did not happen. The third conditional format typically uses the past perfect tense in the 'if' clause ("had + past participle") and "would have" plus the past participle in the main clause. The correct phrase for this scenario is "had - have." Therefore, the sentence should read: "If Immanuel had enough money to buy the car, he would have gone to the party with you." This grammatical structure effectively conveys a hypothetical past condition (having enough money) and its potential consequence (going to the party), both of which did not occur.
13.

Noel would ________ you all if he had received more money from his parents.

Answer: Have treated
Explanation:
 This sentence uses the third conditional, which is used to talk about hypothetical situations in the past and their possible outcomes. In the third conditional, the structure is "if" + past perfect (had received) + "would have" + past participle (have treated). The correct phrase to complete this sentence is "have treated." Therefore, the sentence should read: "Noel would have treated you all if he had received more money from his parents." This structure accurately reflects a past hypothetical scenario and its potential consequence, neither of which actually occurred.
14.

My math teacher will allow us to take the test early if we _____ the exercises she provided us with yesterday.

Answer: Do
Explanation:
This sentence is an example of the first conditional, which is used to talk about real and possible future events. In the first conditional, the "if" clause uses the present simple tense to describe a condition that might happen, and the main clause uses "will" followed by the base verb to describe the likely outcome. The correct verb to complete the sentence is "do," making the sentence read: "My math teacher will allow us to take the test early if we do the exercises she provided us with yesterday." This structure indicates a real possibility that depends on the condition of completing the exercises.
15.

If Jack does not do the dishes, Martha _____ give him a punishment.

Answer: Will
Explanation:
This sentence is an example of the first conditional, which is used to discuss real and possible future events. The structure of the first conditional is "if" + present simple (does not do) + "will" + base verb (give). The correct verb to complete the sentence is "will," making the sentence read: "If Jack does not do the dishes, Martha will give him a punishment." This structure indicates a real possibility that Martha's action of giving a punishment is contingent upon Jack's action of not doing the dishes.
16.

Sam and Joe __________ you in the hospital if they have enough time this afternoon.

Answer: Will visit
Explanation:
 This sentence uses the first conditional, which describes real and possible future events. The structure of the first conditional is "if" + present simple (have) + "will" + base verb (visit). The correct form to complete the sentence is "will visit," making it read: "Sam and Joe will visit you in the hospital if they have enough time this afternoon." This structure indicates a likely future action (visiting) that depends on a condition (having enough time).
17.

If Anita _____ her work on time, she will go home early.

Answer: Does
Explanation:
This sentence is an example of the first conditional, which is used to discuss real and possible future events. The structure of the first conditional is "if" + present simple (does) + "will" + base verb (go). The correct verb to complete the sentence is "does," making it read: "If Anita does her work on time, she will go home early." This structure indicates a real possibility that going home early depends on the condition of completing her work on time.
18.

If we ________ in Rome, Fransesco will visit us.

Answer: Are
Explanation:
This sentence is an example of the first conditional, which is used to discuss real and possible future events. The structure of the first conditional is "if" + present simple (are) + "will" + base verb (visit). The correct verb to complete the sentence is "are," making it read: "If we are in Rome, Francesco will visit us." This structure indicates a real possibility that Francesco's visit depends on the condition of us being in Rome.
19.

If Susan ______ harder that time, she would have gotten a better grade.

Answer: Studied
Explanation:
This sentence uses the third conditional, which is used to discuss hypothetical situations in the past and their possible outcomes. The structure of the third conditional is "if" + past perfect (had studied) + "would have" + past participle (gotten). The correct form to complete the sentence is "studied," making it read: "If Susan studied harder that time, she would have gotten a better grade." This structure indicates a past hypothetical situation and its potential result, neither of which actually occurred. However, since the sentence structure provided suggests the need for a past simple tense, "studied" is used to convey the hypothetical situation.
20.

If James ______ enough money, he _______ buy a new car next year.

Answer: Has - will
Explanation:
This sentence is an example of the first conditional, which is used to discuss real and possible future events. The structure of the first conditional is "if" + present simple (has) + "will" + base verb (buy). The correct form to complete the sentence is "has - will," making it read: "If James has enough money, he will buy a new car next year." This structure indicates a real possibility that James buying a new car next year is contingent on the condition of him having enough money.
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