Using Quotation Marks Quiz #2

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| By BryanGodfrey
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BryanGodfrey
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Quizzes Created: 1 | Total Attempts: 283
Questions: 14 | Attempts: 283

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Punctuation Quizzes & Trivia

Using Quotation Marks. Select the letter of the choice that correctly punctuates the sentence.


Questions and Answers
  • 1. 

    Science fiction writer Ursula Le Guinn writes: ʺI was raised as irreligious as a jack rabbit, and probably this is one reason Mark Twain made so much sense to me.ʺ

    • A.

      Writes ʺI

    • B.

      Writes, ʺI

    • C.

      Meʺ

    • D.

      (already correct)

    Correct Answer
    B. Writes, ʺI
    Explanation
    The correct answer is "writes, ʺI". This is because the sentence is quoting Ursula Le Guinn, who is the subject of the sentence. Therefore, the verb "writes" should agree with the subject "Ursula Le Guinn" and not with the pronoun "I".

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  • 2. 

    She asks, ʺCould anybody but Mark Twain have told the story of Adam and Eve without mentioning Jehovah.ʺ

    • A.

      Asks: ʺCould

    • B.

      Jehovahʺ?

    • C.

      Jehovah?ʺ

    • D.

      (already correct)

    Correct Answer
    C. Jehovah?ʺ
    Explanation
    The given correct answer is "Jehovah?". The question is asking if anyone other than Mark Twain could have told the story of Adam and Eve without mentioning Jehovah. The correct answer is simply restating the question, indicating that it is already correct and does not need any further explanation.

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  • 3. 

    James Joyceʹs response to complaints about his use of vulgar language is thisʺ: This race and this life produced me--I shall express myself as I am.ʺ

    • A.

      This, ʺThis

    • B.

      This: ʺThis

    • C.

      I amʺ.

    • D.

      (already correct)

    Correct Answer
    B. This: ʺThis
    Explanation
    James Joyce is defending his use of vulgar language by asserting that his upbringing and experiences have shaped him as an individual, and he has the right to express himself authentically. He believes that his language is a reflection of who he is, and he should not be constrained by societal expectations or criticisms. This response suggests that Joyce sees his use of vulgar language as an integral part of his artistic expression and personal identity.

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  • 4. 

    Henry James: The Private Universe is the title of an article written by Graham Greene.

    • A.

      Henry James: ʺThe Private Universe

    • B.

      ʹHenry James: The Private Universeʹ

    • C.

      ʺHenry James: The Private Universeʺ

    • D.

      (already correct)

    Correct Answer
    C. ʺHenry James: The Private Universeʺ
    Explanation
    The correct answer is "Henry James: The Private Universe" because it is already correct. The question asks for the correct answer among the given options, and this option is the same as the original statement, making it the correct choice.

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  • 5. 

    Writing about the conclusion of The Adventures of Huckleberry Finn, Toni Morrison wonders, ʺWill that undefined space, so falsely imagined as ʺopen,ʺ be free of social chaos, personal morbidity, and further moral complications embedded in adulthood and citizenship?ʺ

    • A.

      ʹopen,ʹ

    • B.

      Citizenshipʹ?

    • C.

      Citizenship.ʺ?

    • D.

      (already correct)

    Correct Answer
    A. ʹopen,ʹ
    Explanation
    Toni Morrison questions whether the undefined space, which is often perceived as being "open," will truly be free from social chaos, personal morbidity, and additional moral complexities that are associated with adulthood and citizenship. The word "open" is already correct in the given answer.

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  • 6. 

    An early view of the novel Arrowsmith by Sinclair Lewis concludes with the following assessment: Artistically, Arrowsmith is an authentic step forward. The novel is full of passages of a quiet noble felicity and the old skill in presenting character through dialogue never fails. Babbitt is generic or he is nothing (Stewart 36)

    • A.

      Artistically . . . nothing (Stewart 36).

    • B.

      ʺArtistically . . . nothing.ʺ (Stewart 36)

    • C.

      ʺArtistically . . . nothingʺ (Stewart 36).

    • D.

      (already correct)

    Correct Answer
    C. ʺArtistically . . . nothingʺ (Stewart 36).
    Explanation
    The correct answer is "ʺArtistically . . . nothingʺ (Stewart 36)." This quote is a concise and direct statement that reflects the earlier assessment of the novel Arrowsmith by Sinclair Lewis. It suggests that artistically, the novel does not offer anything significant or noteworthy. The mention of "Stewart 36" indicates that this assessment was made by Stewart and can be found on page 36 of a source.

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  • 7. 

    Hal Holbrook says that ʺhe wasnʹt aware of Mark Twainʹs potential for social commentary until he was in Little Rock in 1957.ʺ

    • A.

      Until I was

    • B.

      1957ʺ.

    • C.

      No quotation marks needed.

    • D.

      (already correct)

    Correct Answer
    C. No quotation marks needed.
    Explanation
    The given correct answer states that no quotation marks are needed in the sentence. This is because the sentence is a direct statement made by Hal Holbrook and does not require any quotation marks to indicate that it is a quote. The sentence is already correctly written without the need for any changes.

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  • 8. 

    In Roughing It, Mark Twain has this to say about the fate of the thousands of young men who came to Virginia City seeking gold ʺall gone, or nearly allπvictims devoted upon the altar of the golden calf.ʺ

    • A.

      ʹRoughing Itʹ

    • B.

      Gold: ʺAll

    • C.

      Gold. ʺAll

    • D.

      (already correct)

    Correct Answer
    B. Gold: ʺAll
    Explanation
    The given correct answer is "gold: 'All'". This means that according to Mark Twain in his book "Roughing It," all the young men who came to Virginia City seeking gold ended up being victims sacrificed for the pursuit of wealth.

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  • 9. 

    According to an early review of D. H. Lawrenceʹs Sons and Lovers, ʺThe book is full of short, vivid descriptions: ʹThe steep swoop of highroad lay in its cool morning dust...ʺ

    • A.

      ʺSons and Loversʺ

    • B.

      Dust...ʹ

    • C.

      Dust...ʹʺ

    • D.

      (already correct)

    Correct Answer
    C. Dust...ʹʺ
    Explanation
    The correct answer is "dust...ʹʺ" because it accurately represents the repetition of the word "dust" in the given excerpt from the review. The repetition of this word emphasizes the vividness of the descriptions in D. H. Lawrence's Sons and Lovers, creating a visual image of the highroad covered in cool morning dust.

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  • 10. 

    ʺArt itself,ʺ Conrad wrote ʺmay be defined as a single‐minded attempt to render the highest kind of justice to the visible universe.ʺ

    • A.

      Conrad wrote, ʺmay

    • B.

      Conrad wrote. ʺMay

    • C.

      Conrad wrote: ʺmay

    • D.

      (already correct)

    Correct Answer
    A. Conrad wrote, ʺmay
    Explanation
    Conrad wrote, "may" is the correct answer because it accurately completes the sentence and maintains the proper punctuation and capitalization. The sentence is quoting Conrad's statement about art being a single-minded attempt to render justice to the visible universe. The phrase "may be defined as" suggests that Conrad is offering a possible definition or interpretation of art.

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  • 11. 

    What a brilliant prediction: ʺProust will never be a widely read writer.ʺ

    • A.

      ʹbrilliantʹ

    • B.

      "never"

    • C.

      Prediction,

    • D.

      (already correct)

    Correct Answer
    D. (already correct)
    Explanation
    The given correct answer is "already correct". This implies that the statement "Proust will never be a widely read writer" is a brilliant prediction. The use of the word "brilliant" suggests that the prediction is highly intelligent or insightful. The inclusion of the word "never" emphasizes the strong belief that Proust's work will never gain widespread popularity. Overall, the answer affirms the accuracy and brilliance of the prediction made.

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  • 12. 

    ʺHere again is Kiplingʹs old dictum that ʺEast is East and West is West.ʺ

    • A.

      ʹEast is East and West is West.ʹʺ

    • B.

      ʹEast is East and West is West.ʹ

    • C.

      East is East and West is West.ʺ

    • D.

      (already correct)

    Correct Answer
    A. ʹEast is East and West is West.ʹʺ
    Explanation
    The correct answer is "East is East and West is West." This statement reflects Kipling's old dictum, emphasizing the distinct differences between the East and the West. It suggests that these two regions have their own unique characteristics, cultures, and ways of life that set them apart from each other. The repetition of the statement reinforces the idea that the East and the West are fundamentally separate and should not be confused or mixed together.

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  • 13. 

    According to Donald Adams, Light in August is a powerful novel, a book which secures Mr. Faulknerʹs place in the very first rank of American Fiction writers.ʺ

    • A.

      ʺLight in August

    • B.

      ʺʹLight in Augustʹ

    • C.

      Light in August (underlined)

    • D.

      (already correct)

    Correct Answer
    C. Light in August (underlined)
    Explanation
    The given correct answer is "Light in August (underlined)". This answer is correct because it accurately identifies the correct format of the title as it appears in the original quote. The underlining of the title is a specific formatting choice made by the author, Donald Adams, and is therefore the correct answer.

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  • 14. 

    Is the following quote about James Joyceʹs Ulysses an elitist remark: ʺThe average intelligent reader will glean little or nothing from it.ʺ?

    • A.

      Remark, ʺThe

    • B.

      From itʺ?

    • C.

      From it?ʺ

    • D.

      (already correct)

    Correct Answer
    B. From itʺ?
    Explanation
    The given quote about James Joyce's Ulysses can be seen as an elitist remark because it suggests that only an "average intelligent reader" would not be able to understand or appreciate the book. This implies that the book is meant for a select group of highly intelligent individuals, excluding those who may not possess the same level of intelligence. The remark implies a sense of exclusivity and superiority, suggesting that only a certain elite group of readers can truly appreciate the book.

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