Sia 101 - Week 3

15 Questions | Total Attempts: 24

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Sia 101 - Week 3

System Integration and Architecture 1 Week 3


Questions and Answers
  • 1. 
    Business process modeling is the graphical representation of a company’s business processes or workflows, as a means of identifying potential improvements.
    • A. 

      Modeling

    • B. 

      Business Process Modeling

    • C. 

      Architecture Modeling

    • D. 

      Process Modeling

  • 2. 
    It is the easiest and most widely used BP modeling techniques. The way this works is pretty self-explanatory – you map your processes step by step.
    • A. 

      Process Flowchart

    • B. 

      Flowchart

    • C. 

      Progress Chart

    • D. 

      Software Flowchart

  • 3. 
    Is an open-industry standard for BP modeling and was developed by the BPMI
    • A. 

      BPMN

    • B. 

      Modeling Notation

    • C. 

      Process Notation

    • D. 

      COTC

  • 4. 
    It can be carried out exactly the same way as flowcharts, with the only difference being that you’d be using the elements within the graph as defined by BPMN methodology, not your own preference.
    • A. 

      Process Notation

    • B. 

      Business Process Modeling Notation

    • C. 

      Data Flow Diagram

    • D. 

      Flowchart

  • 5. 
    How to do Business Process Modeling?
    • A. 

      Model Existing Process 

    • B. 

      Identify Inefficiencies & Potential Improvements 

    • C. 

      Design To-Be Process 

    • D. 

      Requirement Deliverable

  • 6. 
    COTS is an acronym for[Blank]
  • 7. 
    BCP[Blank]
  • 8. 
    [Blank] are statements that identify the essential needs of a system in order for it to have value and utility.
  • 9. 
    The starting point of the requirements engineering process is an elicitation process that involves a number of people to ensure consideration of a broad scope of potential ideas and candidate problems
    • A. 

      Elicitation Phase

    • B. 

      Organization Phase

    • C. 

      Analysis Phase

    • D. 

      Prototype Phase

  • 10. 
    In this step there is no transformation of the requirements, but simple classification and categorization. For example, requirements may be grouped into functional vs. nonfunctional requirements.
    • A. 

      Organization Phase

    • B. 

      Analysis Phase

    • C. 

      Prototype Phase

  • 11. 
    Requirements determination addresses the gathering and documenting of the true and real requirements for the Information System being developed.
    • A. 

      True

    • B. 

      False

  • 12. 
    Requirements is the wants and /or needs of the user within a problem domain.
    • A. 

      True

    • B. 

      False

  • 13. 
    Fact – Finding Methods
    • A. 

      Sampling (of existing documentation, forms, and databases).

    • B. 

      Research and site visits

    • C. 

      Observation of the work environment.

    • D. 

      Questionnaires

    • E. 

      Interviews.  

    • F. 

      JAD/Joint requirements planning (JRP).

    • G. 

      Prototyping

    • H. 

      None of the above

  • 14. 
    User Requirements are statements in Natural language  plus diagrams of services the system provides, together with its operational constraints.
    • A. 

      True

    • B. 

      False

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