Tone Mc Questions

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Quizzes Created: 1 | Total Attempts: 755
Questions: 10 | Attempts: 755

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Tone Mc Questions - Quiz


Questions and Answers
  • 1. 

          "There were always children there, and I spent all my time with the children, only with the children. They were the children of the village where I lived, a whole gang of them, who went to the local school.  I was simply with them mostly, and I spent all my four years like that. I did not want anything else." (from The Idiot, Dostoyevsky)

    • A.

      Amused

    • B.

      Reflective

    • C.

      Reverent

    • D.

      Remorseful

    Correct Answer
    B. Reflective
    Explanation
    The speaker in the passage expresses a sense of contentment and satisfaction with spending time with the children in the village. They mention that they did not want anything else and spent all their time with the children. This suggests that the speaker is reflecting on their past experiences and cherishing the memories of their time with the children. The word "reflective" captures this sentiment of looking back and appreciating the moments spent with the children.

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  • 2. 

          Time passed.       Susan waited.       The more Susan waited, the more the doorbell didn't ring. Or the phone.  She looked at her watch. She felt that now was about the time that she could legitimately begin to feel cross. She was cross already, of course, but that had been in her own time, so to speak. They were well and truly into his time now, and even allowing for traffic, mishaps, and general vagueness and dilatoriness, it was now well over half an hour past the time that he had insisted was the latest time they could possibly afford to leave, so she'd better be ready. (from Dirk Gently's Holistic Detective Agency, Douglas Adams)

    • A.

      Apprehensive

    • B.

      Elegiac

    • C.

      Disdainful

    • D.

      Threatening

    Correct Answer
    A. Apprehensive
    Explanation
    The passage describes Susan waiting for someone who is running late. She is becoming increasingly frustrated and angry as time passes and the person does not arrive. The word "apprehensive" accurately describes Susan's feelings in this situation, as she is anxious and worried about the person's delay.

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  • 3. 

    The world is so full of a number of things, I'm sure we should all be as happy as kings. (from "Happy Thought,"  Robert Louis Stevenson)

    • A.

      Bantering

    • B.

      Simpering

    • C.

      Pedantic

    • D.

      Amused

    Correct Answer
    B. Simpering
    Explanation
    Simpering means to smile or speak in a silly, affected, or self-conscious way. In the given quote, the speaker expresses the belief that the world is filled with many things, suggesting that there is an abundance of happiness and joy to be found. The word "simpering" does not fit in this context as it implies a superficial or insincere display of happiness, which contradicts the speaker's assertion that genuine happiness should be abundant.

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  • 4. 

          The hunger artist sometimes remarked to himself that perhaps things might look a little brighter if he were not located quite so near the stables.  But he did not dare complain to the management; after all he had the animals to thank for the numerous visitors who did pass his cage, among whom there always might be the one who was there just to see him, and lord knew where they might tuck him away if he called attention to his existence and thereby to the fact that, strictly speaking, he was no more than an obstacle in the path to the animals. (from "A Hunger Artist," Kafka)

    • A.

      Detached

    • B.

      Persuasive

    • C.

      Sympathetic

    • D.

      Disdainful

    Correct Answer
    C. Sympathetic
    Explanation
    The correct answer is "sympathetic." This is because the hunger artist, despite feeling unhappy about his location near the stables, does not complain to the management. He acknowledges that he owes his visitors to the animals and fears that drawing attention to himself would make him seem like an obstacle. This suggests that he understands the circumstances and has empathy for the animals and the potential consequences of his actions.

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  • 5. 

          No crowd of serfs ran out on to the steps to meet the masters; a little girl of twelve years made her appearance alone.  After her there came out of the house a young lad, very like Piotr, dressed in a coat of gray livery, with white armorial buttons, the servant of Pavel Petrovitch Kirsanov. Without speaking, he opened the door of the carriage, and unbuttoned the apron of the coach. Nikolai Petrovitch, with his son and Bazarov, walked through a dark and empty hall.   (from Fathers and Sons, Turgenev)

    • A.

      Reflective

    • B.

      Urgent

    • C.

      Somber

    • D.

      Apprehensive

    Correct Answer
    C. Somber
    Explanation
    The given passage describes a scene where a young girl and a servant come out of a house to meet the masters. The atmosphere is described as "dark and empty," which suggests a sense of sadness or seriousness. This somber tone is further emphasized by the absence of a crowd or any joyful or enthusiastic welcome. Therefore, the correct answer is "somber."

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  • 6. 

    She tells them right back in a loud, brassy voice that he's already plenty damn clean, thank you.       "They showered me this morning at the courthouse and last night at the jail. And I swear I believe they'd of washed my ears for me on the taxi over if they coulda found the facilities. Hoo boy, seems like every time they ship me someplace I gotta get scrubbed down before, after, and during the operation--and get back away from me with that thermometer, Sam." (from One Flew Over the Cukckoos Nest, Kesey)

    • A.

      Disappointed

    • B.

      Condescending

    • C.

      Amused

    • D.

      Audacious

    Correct Answer
    D. Audacious
    Explanation
    The speaker's response, characterized by a loud and brassy voice, shows a bold and daring attitude. They confidently assert that they are already clean and express their annoyance at being constantly subjected to unnecessary cleaning procedures. This audacious response demonstrates their fearlessness and willingness to challenge authority.

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  • 7. 

    God is love; his mercy brightens All the path in which we rove; Bliss he wakes and woe he lightens; God is wisdom, God is love. (from "God is Love," Bowring)

    • A.

      Pedantic

    • B.

      Simpering

    • C.

      Reverent

    • D.

      Detached

    Correct Answer
    C. Reverent
    Explanation
    The word "reverent" means showing deep respect and admiration. In the given poem, the lines "God is love; his mercy brightens" and "Bliss he wakes and woe he lightens" suggest a deep reverence and admiration for God. The use of words like "love," "mercy," and "wisdom" further emphasize this sense of reverence. Therefore, the word "reverent" is the most appropriate choice to describe the tone of the poem.

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  • 8. 

    Freedom calls you! Quick, be ready- Rouse ye in the name of God, - Onward, onward, strong and steady, - Dash to earth the oppressor's rod. Freedom calls, ye brave! Rise and spurn the name of slave. (from "Polish War Song," Percival)

    • A.

      Provocative

    • B.

      Cynical

    • C.

      Somber

    • D.

      Ominous

    Correct Answer
    A. Provocative
    Explanation
    The given excerpt from the poem "Polish War Song" is calling for action and urging people to rise up against oppression. The language used is strong and passionate, encouraging bravery and defiance. The words "Freedom calls you!" and "Rouse ye in the name of God" are meant to provoke a strong emotional response and inspire action. Therefore, the correct answer "provocative" accurately describes the tone and intention of the excerpt.

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  • 9. 

          At the house of sticks, the wolf again banged on the door and shouted, "Little pigs, little pigs, let me in!"       The pigs shouted back, "Go to hell, you carnivorous, imperialistic oppressor!"       At this, the wolf chuckled condescendingly. He thought to himself: "They are so childlike in their ways. It will be a shame to see them go, but progress cannot be stopped."       So the wolf huffed and puffed and blew down the house of sticks. The pigs ran to the house of bricks, with the wolf close at their heels. Where the house of sticks had stood, other wolves built a time-share condo resort complex for vacationing wolves, with a fiberglass reconstruction of the house of sticks, as well as native curio shops, snorkeling, and dolphin shows.       At the house of bricks, the wolf again banged on the door and shouted, "Little pigs, little pigs, let me in!"       This time in response, the pigs sang songs of solidarity and wrote letters of protest to the United Nations.       By now the wolf was getting angry at the pigs' refusal to see the situation from the carnivore's point of view. So he huffed and he puffed, and huffed and puffed, then grabbed his chest and fell over dead from a massive heart attack brought on from eating too many fatty foods. (from "The Three Little Pigs," Politically Correct Bedtime Stories, James Finn Garner)

    • A.

      Urgent

    • B.

      Satiric

    • C.

      Bantering

    • D.

      Serious

    Correct Answer
    B. Satiric
    Explanation
    The passage is satiric because it uses humor and irony to mock and criticize societal or political issues. It satirizes political correctness and the way it can sometimes be taken to extreme levels, as seen in the pigs' response to the wolf. The passage also satirizes the idea of progress and development at the expense of nature and traditional values, as shown by the construction of the time-share condo resort complex. The exaggerated and absurd events, such as the wolf dying from a heart attack, further emphasize the satirical nature of the passage.

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  • 10. 

          Afterwards we will be as one animal of the forest and be so close that neither one can tell that one of us is one and not the other.  Can you not feel my heart be your heart? (from For Whom the Bell Tolls, Hemingway)

    • A.

      Somber

    • B.

      Factual

    • C.

      Urgent

    • D.

      Intimate

    Correct Answer
    D. Intimate
    Explanation
    The given passage suggests a deep emotional connection between two individuals, where their hearts are so close that they cannot tell them apart. This intimate connection is indicated by phrases like "be as one animal of the forest" and "feel my heart be your heart." The tone of the passage is personal and emotional, creating a sense of intimacy. Therefore, the word "intimate" is the correct answer to describe the overall tone of the passage.

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