Romeo And Juliet Acts I-III Quiz

Approved & Edited by ProProfs Editorial Team
The editorial team at ProProfs Quizzes consists of a select group of subject experts, trivia writers, and quiz masters who have authored over 10,000 quizzes taken by more than 100 million users. This team includes our in-house seasoned quiz moderators and subject matter experts. Our editorial experts, spread across the world, are rigorously trained using our comprehensive guidelines to ensure that you receive the highest quality quizzes.
Learn about Our Editorial Process
| By Henslerm
H
Henslerm
Community Contributor
Quizzes Created: 1 | Total Attempts: 157
Questions: 21 | Attempts: 157

SettingsSettingsSettings
Romeo And Juliet Quizzes & Trivia

Quiz over Acts I-III in order of play.


Questions and Answers
  • 1. 

    What do we learn from the Prologue?

    • A.

      Two families are feuding.

    • B.

      Nothing can remove the feud except the children's death.

    • C.

      Two lovers take their life.

    • D.

      All of the above.

    Correct Answer
    D. All of the above.
    Explanation
    The Prologue in Shakespeare's play Romeo and Juliet reveals that two families are feuding, which is a central conflict in the story. It also mentions that the feud can only be resolved by the death of the children, foreshadowing the tragic events to come. Additionally, the Prologue introduces the concept of two lovers taking their own lives, hinting at the tragic fate of Romeo and Juliet. Therefore, all of the given options are true and can be learned from the Prologue.

    Rate this question:

  • 2. 

    Who begins the fighting in Act I, Scene I?

    • A.

      Benvolio and Tybalt

    • B.

      Sampson, Gregory, and Abram

    • C.

      Benvolio, Abram and Sampson

    • D.

      Sampson, Tybalt and Gregory

    Correct Answer
    B. Sampson, Gregory, and Abram
    Explanation
    In Act I, Scene I, the fighting is initiated by Sampson, Gregory, and Abram. This is evident from the opening lines of the scene where Sampson and Gregory, both servants of the Capulet family, engage in a verbal confrontation with Abram, a servant of the Montague family. The tension escalates, leading to a physical fight between the three characters. Benvolio and Tybalt, although important characters in the play, do not participate in the initial fighting in this particular scene.

    Rate this question:

  • 3. 

    Who says this line, "What, drawn, and talk of peace? I hate the word / As I hate hell, all Montagues, and thee."

    Correct Answer
    Tybalt
    Explanation
    In this line, the speaker expresses their strong hatred towards peace and the Montagues, emphasizing their intense dislike by comparing it to their hatred for hell. The use of the word "thee" suggests that the speaker is addressing someone directly, indicating their animosity towards that person as well. This line is spoken by Tybalt, a hot-headed and aggressive character in Shakespeare's play Romeo and Juliet.

    Rate this question:

  • 4. 

    In Act I, what does the prince say the punishment will be if another fight happens in the streets?

    • A.

      Banishment

    • B.

      Jail

    • C.

      Death

    • D.

      A fine

    Correct Answer
    C. Death
    Explanation
    The prince states that the punishment for another fight in the streets will be death. This suggests that he is extremely strict and serious about maintaining peace and order in the city. The severity of the punishment reflects the prince's determination to prevent any further violence and ensure the safety of the citizens.

    Rate this question:

  • 5. 

    What literary element is included in the following lines: "O heavy lighness, serious vanity, / misshapen chaos of well-seeming forms, / feather of lead, bright smoke, cold fire, sick health, / still-waking sleep, that is not what it is!"

    • A.

      Oxymoron

    • B.

      Similie

    • C.

      Pun

    • D.

      Foreshadow

    Correct Answer
    A. Oxymoron
    Explanation
    The literary element included in the given lines is oxymoron. Oxymoron refers to the combination of contradictory terms or ideas to create a rhetorical effect. In the lines provided, phrases like "heavy lighness," "serious vanity," "feather of lead," and "bright smoke" are examples of oxymorons. These phrases juxtapose contrasting concepts to create a sense of paradox and emphasize the speaker's confusion or conflicting emotions.

    Rate this question:

  • 6. 

    Who says the lines: "But woo her, gentle Paris, get her heart; / My will to her consent is but a part"?

    Correct Answer
    Capulet
    Lord Capulet
    Explanation
    The lines "But woo her, gentle Paris, get her heart; / My will to her consent is but a part" are spoken by Capulet, also known as Lord Capulet. This can be inferred from the context of the lines, where Capulet is advising Paris to woo Juliet and win her heart, as his own will alone is not enough to gain her consent.

    Rate this question:

  • 7. 

    How do Benvolio and Romeo know about the party at the Capulet's?

    • A.

      Mercutio tells them about it.

    • B.

      They receive an invitation from the Capulets.

    • C.

      The Capulet's servant has them read the the invitation for him.

    • D.

      Juliet invited Romeo

    Correct Answer
    C. The Capulet's servant has them read the the invitation for him.
    Explanation
    Benvolio and Romeo know about the party at the Capulet's because the Capulet's servant asks them to read the invitation for him.

    Rate this question:

  • 8. 

    Why does Benvolio want Romeo to crash the Capulet’s party?

    • A.

      So they can get into a fight with Tybalt.

    • B.

      So he can check out other women.

    • C.

      So Romeo can see Rosaline.

    • D.

      So Romeo can meet Juliet.

    Correct Answer
    B. So he can check out other women.
    Explanation
    Benvolio wants Romeo to crash the Capulet's party so that he can check out other women. This suggests that Benvolio is interested in exploring other potential romantic interests for Romeo, possibly to distract him from his infatuation with Rosaline. By encouraging Romeo to attend the party, Benvolio hopes that Romeo will be exposed to different women and potentially find someone else who captures his attention.

    Rate this question:

  • 9. 

    When Romeo says, “My mind misgives some consequence yet hanging in the stars shall bitterly begin his fearful date with this night’s revels,” what example of a literary element is this?

    • A.

      Pun

    • B.

      Foreshadow

    • C.

      Oxymoron

    • D.

      Metaphor

    Correct Answer
    B. Foreshadow
    Explanation
    In this quote, Romeo is expressing a sense of foreboding or unease about something that is going to happen in the future. This suggests that there is a foreshadowing taking place, as he believes that a negative event will occur as a result of the night's revels. Foreshadowing is a literary technique where the author hints or suggests what will happen later in the story, creating suspense and anticipation for the reader.

    Rate this question:

  • 10. 

    Who recognizes Romeo at the party?

    Correct Answer
    Tybalt
    Explanation
    Tybalt recognizes Romeo at the party. This is evident in Act 1, Scene 5 of Shakespeare's play "Romeo and Juliet." Tybalt overhears Romeo's voice and immediately identifies him as a Montague. Tybalt's recognition of Romeo leads to conflict and sets the stage for the ongoing feud between the Capulets and the Montagues.

    Rate this question:

  • 11. 

    Who is Romeo talking to when he says, "Arise, fair sun, and kill the envious moon, / Who is already sick and pale with grief / That thou her maid art far more fair that she."

    • A.

      Juliet

    • B.

      Benvolio

    • C.

      Mercutio

    • D.

      Himself

    Correct Answer
    D. Himself
    Explanation
    In this quote, Romeo is addressing the sun, personifying it as a "fair sun." He is expressing his love and admiration for Juliet, comparing her beauty to the moon and suggesting that she is even more beautiful than the moon. So, when Romeo says, "Arise, fair sun, and kill the envious moon," he is speaking to himself, using poetic language to express his feelings about Juliet.

    Rate this question:

  • 12. 

    In the balcony scene, Act II, Scene II, when Romeo says, "The exchange of thy love's faithful vow for mine," what does he want?

    • A.

      To spend the night with her

    • B.

      To marry her

    • C.

      To ask her out on a date

    • D.

      To exchange phone numbers

    Correct Answer
    B. To marry her
    Explanation
    In the balcony scene, Romeo expresses his desire to marry Juliet when he says, "The exchange of thy love's faithful vow for mine." This statement indicates that Romeo wants Juliet to promise her love and commitment to him in return for his own. This shows that Romeo is serious about their relationship and wants to take it to the next level by getting married.

    Rate this question:

  • 13. 

    Why does the Friar agree to marry Romeo and Juliet secretly?

    • A.

      He can tell they really love each other.

    • B.

      Romeo keeps bugging him until he agrees.

    • C.

      He hopes their families will stop fighting.

    • D.

      He wants to make the families angry.

    Correct Answer
    C. He hopes their families will stop fighting.
    Explanation
    The Friar agrees to marry Romeo and Juliet secretly because he hopes that their marriage will bring an end to the ongoing feud between their families. He believes that their love for each other can help reconcile the Capulets and Montagues, and by marrying them, he sees an opportunity to bring peace and unity between the two warring families.

    Rate this question:

  • 14. 

    Who sends a letter challenging Romeo?

    • A.

      Tybalt

    • B.

      Mercutio

    • C.

      Capulet

    • D.

      Paris

    Correct Answer
    A. Tybalt
    Explanation
    Tybalt sends a letter challenging Romeo. Tybalt is Juliet's hot-tempered cousin and a skilled swordsman. He is angered by Romeo's presence at the Capulet's party and seeks revenge. Tybalt's letter is a direct challenge to Romeo, indicating his intention to duel and settle their differences. This sets the stage for the tragic events that follow in Shakespeare's play, "Romeo and Juliet."

    Rate this question:

  • 15. 

    Why does Romeo refuse to fight Tybalt?

    • A.

      He is afraid because Tybalt is a good swordsman.

    • B.

      He told Juliet he wouldn't fight anyone.

    • C.

      He doesn't want to get in trouble with the prince.

    • D.

      He loves Tybalt too much to kill him.

    Correct Answer
    D. He loves Tybalt too much to kill him.
    Explanation
    Romeo refuses to fight Tybalt because he loves him too much to kill him. This suggests that Romeo's love for Tybalt overrides any desire for violence or revenge. It showcases Romeo's compassionate nature and his willingness to prioritize love and peace over conflict.

    Rate this question:

  • 16. 

    Why does Mercutio fight Tybalt in the book version?

    • A.

      Mercutio stepped in because Romeo would not

    • B.

      Tybalt insulted Mercutio

    • C.

      Mercutio is defending Romeo

    • D.

      Mercutio is attacked by Tybalt

    Correct Answer
    A. Mercutio stepped in because Romeo would not
    Explanation
    Mercutio fights Tybalt in the book version because Romeo refuses to engage in a fight with Tybalt, despite Tybalt's insults. Mercutio, being a loyal friend, steps in to defend Romeo's honor and takes on Tybalt himself.

    Rate this question:

  • 17. 

    What happens to Mercutio and how?

    • A.

      He dies because Romeo accidently stabbed him.

    • B.

      He runs away so he will not face punishment from the prince.

    • C.

      He dies because Tybalt stabbed him.

    • D.

      He runs away so he doesn't fight anyone.

    Correct Answer
    C. He dies because Tybalt stabbed him.
    Explanation
    Mercutio dies because Tybalt stabbed him. This is evident in Shakespeare's play "Romeo and Juliet" when Mercutio gets involved in a duel between Romeo and Tybalt. Mercutio's death serves as a turning point in the play, leading to Romeo seeking revenge and ultimately resulting in the tragic ending of the two young lovers.

    Rate this question:

  • 18. 

    Who says the line, "Either thou or I, or both, must go with him"?

    Correct Answer
    Romeo
    Explanation
    In the play Romeo and Juliet by William Shakespeare, Romeo says the line "Either thou or I, or both, must go with him." This line is spoken by Romeo when he is standing over the dead body of Tybalt, Juliet's cousin, whom he has just killed in a fit of rage. Romeo is expressing his guilt and remorse for his actions, realizing that there will be consequences and that he may have to pay with his own life.

    Rate this question:

  • 19. 

    What is Romeo's punishment for killing Tybalt?

    Correct Answer
    Banishment
    Exile
    Explanation
    Romeo's punishment for killing Tybalt is banishment or exile. This means that he is forced to leave Verona and live in a different place, away from his family and friends. This punishment is given by Prince Escalus as a way to maintain peace and order in the city. By banishing Romeo, the Prince hopes to prevent any further violence or bloodshed between the feuding families of Romeo and Tybalt.

    Rate this question:

  • 20. 

    When we find out that Capulet has arranged for Juliet to be married, what literary element is used?

    • A.

      Oxymoron

    • B.

      Symbol

    • C.

      Metaphor

    • D.

      Dramatic Irony

    Correct Answer
    D. Dramatic Irony
    Explanation
    In this situation, the literary element used is dramatic irony. Dramatic irony occurs when the audience or reader is aware of something that the characters in the story are not. In this case, the audience knows that Capulet has arranged for Juliet to be married, but Juliet herself is not aware of this arrangement. This creates tension and suspense in the story as the audience waits to see how Juliet will react when she eventually finds out about the marriage.

    Rate this question:

  • 21. 

    What is Juliet's reaction to the arranged marriage to Paris and what does she decide to do?

    • A.

      Tells her father she will do as he wishes and will marry Paris.

    • B.

      Tells her father that she doesn't want to marry Paris and goes to Friar Laurence's cell.

    • C.

      Tells her father that she hates him for arranging the marriage and runs away from home.

    • D.

      Tells her father that she doesn't want to marry Paris and runs away to be with Romeo.

    Correct Answer
    B. Tells her father that she doesn't want to marry Paris and goes to Friar Laurence's cell.
    Explanation
    Juliet's reaction to the arranged marriage to Paris is that she doesn't want to marry him. Instead, she decides to go to Friar Laurence's cell for help.

    Rate this question:

Back to Top Back to top
Advertisement
×

Wait!
Here's an interesting quiz for you.

We have other quizzes matching your interest.