Learn About Romeo And Juliet Act V

By Tina Marie
Tina Marie, Langauge, Arts
Tina is a Language Arts and AP Seminar teacher at Mainland Regional High School in NJ, dedicated to guiding students through their academic journey.
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Learn About Romeo And Juliet Act V - Quiz

Do your best to answer these questions from Act V of Romeo and Juliet. All of the information is in the order that it appears in the play. This is an excellent way to prepare for your quiz, but remember to look over vocabulary and other literary terms, too.


Questions and Answers
  • 1. 

    Who speaks these lines? Her body sleeps in Capels' monument. And her immortal part with angels lives. I saw her laid low in her kindred's vault And presently took post to tell it you.

    Explanation
    This is where he goes to Mantua to tell Romeo of Juliet's burial.

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  • 2. 

    Who speaks these lines? Such mortal drugs I have; but Mantua's law Is death to any he that utters them.

    Explanation
    This is after Romeo asks him for poison.

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  • 3. 

    Who speaks these lines? My poverty but not my will consents.

    Explanation
    He agrees to sell Romeo the poison because he's so poor.

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  • 4. 

    Who speaks these lines? Suspecting that we both were in a house Where the infectious pestilence did reign, Sealed up the doors, and would not let us forth. So that my speed to Mantua there was stayed.

    Explanation
    He is unable to deliver the letter because he was quarantined due to the plague.

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  • 5. 

    Who speaks these lines? Now must I to the monument alone. Within this three hours will fair Juliet wake. She will beshrew me much that Romeo Hath had no notice of these accidents.

    Explanation
    This is after he discovers that his letter has not been delivered to Romeo. He realizes that Juliet will awaken all alone in the tomb. Yuk!

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  • 6. 

    Who speaks these lines? O, I am slain! If thou be merciful. Open the tomb, lay me with Juliet.

    Explanation
    Paris is dying. He asks to be lain with Juliet because, as far as he knows, he was supposed to be her husband.

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  • 7. 

    TO WHOM are these lines spoken? O, I am slain! If thou be merciful. Open the tomb, lay me with Juliet.

    Explanation
    In these lines, Romeo is speaking to himself. He exclaims "O, I am slain!" after seeing Juliet apparently dead in the tomb. He then pleads for mercy, asking whoever is present to open the tomb and lay him with Juliet. This shows Romeo's intense love for Juliet and his willingness to die alongside her.

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  • 8. 

    Who speaks these lines? Death, that hath sucked the honey of thy breath, Hath had no power yet upon thy beauty. Thou art not conquered. Beauty's ensign yet Is crimson in thy lips and in thy cheeks, And death's pale flag is not advanced there.

    Explanation
    Duh, Romeo! He even comments here how Juliet still looks alive. That's probably because she's about to wake up.

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  • 9. 

    These lines have an example of what literary term? Death, that hath sucked the honey of thy breath, Hath had no power yet upon thy beauty. Thou art not conquered. Beauty's ensign yet Is crimson in thy lips and in thy cheeks, And death's pale flag is not advanced there.

    • A.

      Simile

    • B.

      Personification

    • C.

      Pun

    • D.

      Hyperbole

    • E.

      Malapropism

    Correct Answer
    B. Personification
    Explanation
    Death is being personified.

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  • 10. 

    Which word in these lines means about the same thing as “repulsive”? Why art thou yet so fair? Shall I believe That unsubstantial Death is amorous, And that the lean abhorred monster keeps Thee here in dark to be his paramour?

    Correct Answer
    abhorred
    Explanation
    In these lines, the word "abhorred" means the same thing as "repulsive". It suggests that the speaker finds the monster to be disgusting and detestable. The use of the word "abhorred" emphasizes the speaker's strong negative feelings towards the monster, implying that it is repulsive to them.

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  • 11. 

    Who speaks these lines? Here's to my love! O true apothecary! Thy drugs are quick. Thus with a kiss I die.

    Correct Answer
    Romeo
    Explanation
    Who takes a poison? Who bought the poison from an apothecary?

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  • 12. 

    Who speaks these lines? Come, come away. Thy husband in thy bosom lies dead, And Paris, too. Come, I'll dispose of thee Among a sisterhood of holy nuns.

    Correct Answer
    Friar Lawrence
    Explanation
    He's telling Juliet who has died, including Paris and her Romeo. He offers to send her to a nunnery.

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  • 13. 

    Who speaks these lines? Yea, noise? Then I'll be brief. O happy dagger! This is thy sheath; there rust, and let me die.

    Correct Answer
    Juliet
    Explanation
    Juliet chooses to kill herself.

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  • 14. 

    Who speaks these lines? See what a scourge is laid upon your hate, That heaven finds means to kill your joys with love. And I, for winking at your discords too, Have lost a brace of kinsmen. All are punished.

    Correct Answer
    Prince
    Explanation
    He points out that both families have lost loved ones due to their feud. He has also lost a relative (Mercutio) because he allowed the fighting to continue.

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  • 15. 

    Who speaks these lines? Go hence, to have more talk of these sad things; Some shall be pardoned, and some punished; For never was a story of more woe Than this of Juliet and her Romeo.

    Correct Answer
    Prince
    Explanation
    The given lines are spoken by the character of the Prince in the play Romeo and Juliet. The Prince delivers these lines at the end of the play, after the tragic deaths of Romeo and Juliet. He is reflecting on the events that have unfolded and the consequences of the feud between the Montagues and Capulets. The lines convey the Prince's sorrow and recognition of the immense tragedy that has occurred, as well as his decision to pardon some and punish others involved in the conflict.

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Tina Marie |Langauge, Arts
Tina is a Language Arts and AP Seminar teacher at Mainland Regional High School in NJ, dedicated to guiding students through their academic journey.
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