Romeo And Juliet Act IV Quiz Questions

By Tina Marie
Tina Marie, Langauge, Arts
Tina is a Language Arts and AP Seminar teacher at Mainland Regional High School in NJ, dedicated to guiding students through their academic journey.
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Romeo And Juliet Act IV Quiz Questions - Quiz

Do your best to answer these questions from Act IV of Romeo and Juliet. All of the information is in the order that it appears in the play. This is an excellent way to prepare for your quiz, but remember to look over vocabulary and other literary terms, too.


Questions and Answers
  • 1. 

    Who speaks these lines? Tell me not, friar, that thou hearest of this, Unless thou tell me how I may prevent it. If in thy wisdom thou canst give no help, Do thou but call my resolution wise And with this knife I'll help it presently.

    Explanation
    Juliet, desperate to avoid marrying Paris has come to Friar Lawrence to seek his help. If he can't help, she'll kill herself (with the knife - ouch).

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  • 2. 

    What literary device is apparent here? JULIET O, bid me leap, rather than marry Paris, From off the battlements of yonder tower; Or walk in thievish ways; or bid me lurk Where serpents are; chain me with roaring bears; Or shut me nightly in a charnel-house, O'er-cover'd quite with dead men's rattling bones, With reeky shanks and yellow chapless skulls; Or bid me go into a new-made grave And hide me with a dead man in his shroud; Things that, to hear them told, have made me tremble; And I will do it without fear or doubt, To live an unstain'd wife to my sweet love.

    • A.

      Simile

    • B.

      Personification

    • C.

      Pun

    • D.

      Hyperbole

    • E.

      Dramatic irony

    Correct Answer
    D. Hyperbole
    Explanation
    Do you really think she wants, for example, to be covered with a "dead man's rattling bones"?

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  • 3. 

    Who speaks these lines? And in this borrowed likeness of shrunk death Thou shalt continue two-and-forty hours, And then awake as from a pleasant sleep.

    Correct Answer
    Friar Lawrence
    Explanation
    He's telling Juliet what the potion will do: place her in a death-like sleep for 42 hours.

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  • 4. 

    Who speaks these lines? Where I have learnt me to repent the sin Of disobedient opposition To you and your behests, and am enjoined By holy Lawrence to fall prostrate here To beg your pardon. Pardon. I beseech you!

    Correct Answer
    Juliet
    Explanation
    As planned, she is aplogizing to her parents and agreeing to marry Paris. The audience knows, however, that this is just a part of her and the Friar's plan.

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  • 5. 

    Who speaks these lines? Send for the County. Go tell him of this. I'll have this knot knit up tomorrow morning. . . . Why, I am glad on't. This is well.

    Correct Answer
    Capulet
    Explanation
    Her father is happy and moves the wedding up a day.

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  • 6. 

    Who speaks these lines? My heart is wondrous light, Since this same wayward girl is so reclaim'd.

    Correct Answer
    Capulet
    Explanation
    Her father is happy that Juliet is finally obedient again.

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  • 7. 

    What literary device is apparent in these lines? My heart is wondrous light, Since this same wayward girl is so reclaim'd.

    • A.

      Simile

    • B.

      Personification

    • C.

      Pun

    • D.

      Hyperbole

    • E.

      Dramatic irony

    Correct Answer
    E. Dramatic irony
    Explanation
    The audience knows that Juliet has not been "reclaimed." She is actually plotting against her father's wishes.

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  • 8. 

    What literary device is apparent in these lines? LADY CAPULET What, are you busy, ho? need you my help? JULIET No, madam; we have cull'd such necessaries As are behoveful for our state to-morrow: So please you, let me now be left alone, And let the nurse this night sit up with you; For, I am sure, you have your hands full all, In this so sudden business. LADY CAPULET Good night: Get thee to bed, and rest; for thou hast need.

    • A.

      Simile

    • B.

      Personification

    • C.

      Pun

    • D.

      Hyperbole

    • E.

      Dramatic irony

    Correct Answer
    E. Dramatic irony
    Explanation
    Juliet does have what is necessary for sleep, but it is not what her mother thinks - Juliet has the potion.
    There is also dramatic irony when Lady Capulet tells her daughter, "Get thee to bed, and rest; for thou hast need," because the audience knows that Juliet is about to get a lot of sleep!

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  • 9. 

    Who speaks these lines? Farewell! God knows when we shall meet again. I have a faint cold fear thrills through my veins That almost freezes up the heat of life. I'll call them back again to comfort me. . . . My dismal scene I needs must act alone. Come, vial.

    Correct Answer
    Juliet
    Explanation
    Juliet is nervous because so many things could go wrong. Unfortunately, she is alone in this endeavor.

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  • 10. 

    What literary device is apparent here? Death lies on her like an untimely frost Upon the sweetest flower of all the field.

    • A.

      Simile

    • B.

      Personification

    • C.

      Pun

    • D.

      Hyperbole

    • E.

      Dramatic irony

    Correct Answer
    A. Simile
    Explanation
    Death is "like" an early frost that kills the most beautiful flower in the field before its time.

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  • 11. 

    Who speaks these lines? Death is my son-in-law, Death is my heir, My daughter he hath wedded. I will die, And leave him all--life, living, all is Death's.

    Correct Answer
    Capulet
    Explanation
    He is reacting to Juliet's "death."

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  • 12. 

    The following lines have an example of what literary device? Death is my son-in-law, Death is my heir, My daughter he hath wedded. I will die, And leave him all--life, living, all is Death's.

    • A.

      Simile

    • B.

      Personification

    • C.

      Pun

    • D.

      Hyperbole

    • E.

      Dramatic irony

    Correct Answer
    B. Personification
    Explanation
    Death is being personified. Juliet is now married to death (rather than Paris).

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Tina Marie |Langauge, Arts
Tina is a Language Arts and AP Seminar teacher at Mainland Regional High School in NJ, dedicated to guiding students through their academic journey.

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