Romeo And Juliet Act I Quiz: Trivia!

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| By Tina Marie
Tina Marie, Langauge, Arts
Tina is a Language Arts and AP Seminar teacher at Mainland Regional High School in NJ, dedicated to guiding students through their academic journey.
Quizzes Created: 5 | Total Attempts: 13,284
Questions: 17 | Attempts: 1,773

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Romeo And Juliet Act I Quiz: Trivia! - Quiz

Do your best to answer these questions from Act I of Romeo and Juliet. All of the information is in the order that it appears in the play. This is an excellent way to prepare for your quiz, but remember to look over vocabulary and other literary terms, too.


Questions and Answers
  • 1. 

    Who speaks these lines? Tut! I have lost myself; I am not here; This is not Romeo, he's some other where.

    Explanation
    He feels he is "not himself" because he is so distraught due to his unrequited love for Rosaline.

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  • 2. 

    Who is BEING DESCRIBED in these lines? With Cupid's arrow. She hath Dian's wit . . . O, she is rich in beauty; only poor That, when she dies, with beauty dies her store.

    Explanation
    She has taken a vow of chastity.

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  • 3. 

    Who speaks these lines? But Montague is bound as well as I, In penalty alike; and 'tis not hard, I think, For men so old as we to keep the peace.

    Explanation
    He thinks that since both he and Montague are old and face the same consequences, they can avoid fighting in the future.

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  • 4. 

    TO WHOM are these lines spoken? This night I hold an old accustomed feast, Whereto I have invited many a guest, Such as I love; and you among the store, One more, most welcome, makes my number more.

    Explanation
    He's going to get the change to "woo" Juliet.

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  • 5. 

    Who speaks this line? It is an honor that I dream not of.

    Explanation
    She hasn't even thought about getting married yet.

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  • 6. 

    The following lines have an example of what literary device? Romeo: The game was ne'er so fair, and I am done. Mercutio: Tut! Dun's the mouse, the constable's own word. / If thou art Dun, we'll draw thee from the mire.

    • A.

      Metaphor

    • B.

      Oxymoron

    • C.

      Pun

    • D.

      Couplet

    • E.

      Foreshadowing

    Correct Answer
    C. Pun
    Explanation
    DONE and DUN

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  • 7. 

    Who speaks these lines? O, then I see Queen Mab hath been with you. She is the fairies' midwife, and she comes In shape no bigger than an agate stone On the forefinger of an alderman, Drawn with a team of little atomies Over men's noses as they lie asleep.

    Correct Answer
    Mercutio
    Explanation
    This is the beginning of his famous Queen Mab speech.

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  • 8. 

    Who speaks these lines? [M]y mind misgives Some consequence yet hanging in the stars Shall bitterly begin his fearful date With this night's revels and expire the term Of a despised life, closed in my breast, By some vile forfeit of untimely death.

    Correct Answer
    Romeo
    Explanation
    This is what he says before entering the Capulet party; it explains why, in addition to his sadness over Rosaline, that he is reluctant to go (his dream).

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  • 9. 

    These lines have an example of what literary term? [M]y mind misgives Some consequence yet hanging in the stars Shall bitterly begin his fearful date With this night's revels and expire the term Of a despised life, closed in my breast, By some vile forfeit of untimely death.

    • A.

      Metaphor

    • B.

      Oxymoron

    • C.

      Pun

    • D.

      Couplet

    • E.

      Foreshadowing

    Correct Answer
    E. Foreshadowing
    Explanation
    Romeo thinks something is fated to happen at the party that will lead to his "untimely death." This is true: He meets and falls in love with Juliet.

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  • 10. 

    Who speaks these lines? O, She doth teach the torches to burn bright! It seems she hangs upon the cheek of night As a rich jewel in an Ethiop's ear—

    Correct Answer
    Romeo
    Explanation
    He sees Juliet!

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  • 11. 

    The following lines are an example of what device? Did my heart love till now? Forswear it, sight! For I ne'er saw true beauty till this night.

    • A.

      Metaphor

    • B.

      Oxymoron

    • C.

      Pun

    • D.

      Couplet

    • E.

      Foreshadowing

    Correct Answer
    D. Couplet
    Explanation
    SIGHT / NIGHT

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  • 12. 

    Who speaks these lines? Uncle, this is a Montague, our foe, A villain, that is hither come in spite To scorn at our solemnity this night.

    Correct Answer
    Tybalt
    Explanation
    He's thinking, "How dare Romeo show up here!?!"

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  • 13. 

    Who speaks these lines? Content thee, gentle coz, let him alone. 'A bears him like a portly gentleman, And, to say truth, Verona brags of him To be virtuous and well-governed youth. I would not for the wealth of all this town Here in my house do him disparagement.

    Correct Answer
    Capulet
    Explanation
    He is being rational, realizing Romeo is known for being "virtuous and well-governed."

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  • 14. 

    TO WHOM are these lines spoken? Content thee, gentle coz, let him alone. 'A bears him like a portly gentleman, And, to say truth, Verona brags of him To be virtuous and well-governed youth. I would not for the wealth of all this town Here in my house do him disparagement.

    Correct Answer
    Tybalt
    Explanation
    Capulet does not want Tybalt to fight and/or insult Romeo, who is generally a nice guy, in his house.

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  • 15. 

    What word in these lines means “disrespect”? Content thee, gentle coz, let him alone. 'A bears him like a portly gentleman, And, to say the truth, Verona brags of him To be virtuous and well-governed youth. I would not for the wealth of all this town Here in my house do him disparagement.

    Correct Answer
    disparagement
    Explanation
    In these lines, the word "disparagement" means to belittle or criticize someone. The speaker is saying that they would not disrespect or criticize the person in question, even if it meant losing all their wealth.

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  • 16. 

    Who speaks these lines? If I profane with my unworthiest hand This holy shrine, the gentle sin is this: My lips, two blushing pilgrims, ready stand To smooth that rough touch with a tender kiss.

    Correct Answer
    Romeo
    Explanation
    Now, he's "wooing" Juliet.

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  • 17. 

    Who speaks these lines? My only love sprung from my only hate! Too early seen unknown, and known too late! Prodigious birth of love it is to me That I must love a loathed enemy.

    Correct Answer
    Juliet
    Explanation
    She's thinking, "Oh poo! Of all the people for me to fall in love with! A Montague!"

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Our quizzes are rigorously reviewed, monitored and continuously updated by our expert board to maintain accuracy, relevance, and timeliness.

  • Current Version
  • Mar 21, 2022
    Quiz Edited by
    ProProfs Editorial Team
  • Feb 03, 2008
    Quiz Created by
    Tina Marie
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