Reasons For The Treaty Of Waitangi

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Reasons For The Treaty Of Waitangi - Quiz

Quiz about reasons for Treaty of Waitangi


Questions and Answers
  • 1. 

    What did Maori trade in exchange for muskets?

    • A.

      Gas

    • B.

      Food and flax

    • C.

      Oil

    • D.

      Copper

    Correct Answer
    B. Food and flax
    Explanation
    Maori traded food and flax in exchange for muskets. Food was an essential resource for survival and flax was used for various purposes such as making clothing, ropes, and baskets. Muskets were highly valued by Maori as they provided a significant advantage in warfare and hunting. Therefore, trading food and flax for muskets allowed Maori to acquire a powerful weapon while also meeting their basic needs and utilizing their abundant resources.

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  • 2. 

    At the beginning of which century were muskets introduced?

    • A.

      18th Century

    • B.

      19th Century

    • C.

      20 Century

    • D.

      21st Century

    Correct Answer
    B. 19th Century
    Explanation
    Muskets were introduced in the 18th century, so the given answer of 19th century is incorrect. Muskets were early, smoothbore firearms that were commonly used by infantry in the 18th century. They played a significant role in warfare during this time period, particularly in the American Revolutionary War and the Napoleonic Wars. The 19th century saw the development of more advanced firearms, such as rifles and breech-loading guns, but muskets were already in use prior to this century.

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  • 3. 

    Who were the musket wars between?

    • A.

      Maori tribes against other Maori tribes

    • B.

      Maori tribes and Pakeha settlers

    • C.

      Whalers and Missionaries

    • D.

      The British Empire and France

    Correct Answer
    A. Maori tribes against other Maori tribes
    Explanation
    The musket wars were conflicts that took place in New Zealand during the early 19th century. They were primarily fought between various Maori tribes, who were competing for territory and resources. The introduction of muskets by European traders escalated the conflicts, as tribes with access to these firearms gained a significant advantage over those without. The wars resulted in a significant loss of life and had a profound impact on Maori society and culture.

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  • 4. 

    Approximately how many Maori were killed in the Musket Wars?

    • A.

      2000

    • B.

      20,000

    • C.

      200,000

    • D.

      2 million

    Correct Answer
    B. 20,000
    Explanation
    During the Musket Wars, an estimated 20,000 Maori people were killed. This conflict, which took place in New Zealand between the early 1800s and mid-1800s, involved various Maori tribes fighting against each other for territory and resources. The introduction of muskets by European traders escalated the violence and resulted in a significant loss of life. The figure of 20,000 deaths represents the approximate number of Maori casualties during this period of intense warfare.

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  • 5. 

    In 1830 there were an estimated 100,000 Maori – how many Pakeha were there?  

    • A.

      1 million

    • B.

      100.000

    • C.

      200

    • D.

      1000

    Correct Answer
    C. 200
    Explanation
    The correct answer is 200. This suggests that in 1830, there were significantly fewer Pakeha (non-Maori) individuals compared to the Maori population. The small number of Pakeha indicates that New Zealand was still sparsely populated by Europeans at that time.

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  • 6. 

    What was the biggest port in NZ at that time in the 1830s?

    • A.

      Kororareka

    • B.

      Auckland

    • C.

      Wellington

    • D.

      Napier

    Correct Answer
    A. Kororareka
    Explanation
    Kororareka was the biggest port in New Zealand during the 1830s. This is because it was a bustling hub for whaling and trading activities, attracting many ships and merchants. The port's strategic location in the Bay of Islands made it an important center for maritime trade, contributing to its prominence during that time period.

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  • 7. 

    What was New Zealand's capital at this time commonly known as?

    • A.

      The Hell Hole of the World

    • B.

      The Heavenly Paradise

    • C.

      The Paradise of the South Pacific

    • D.

      The Hell Hole of the Pacific

    Correct Answer
    D. The Hell Hole of the Pacific
    Explanation
    During a certain time period, New Zealand was commonly referred to as "The Hell Hole of the Pacific." This nickname suggests that New Zealand was perceived as a challenging or undesirable place to be during that time. It may have been associated with harsh conditions, difficult living conditions, or other negative aspects that earned it this nickname.

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  • 8. 

    Why was the capital of New Zealand known as this?

    • A.

      It was a tourist destination for whalers

    • B.

      It was full of lawlessness, prostitution, violence and disease

    • C.

      It was famous for its dangerous coastline

    • D.

      It was rumoured to be cursed in Maori legends

    Correct Answer
    B. It was full of lawlessness, prostitution, violence and disease
    Explanation
    The capital of New Zealand was known for being full of lawlessness, prostitution, violence, and disease. This suggests that the city had a reputation for being a dangerous and chaotic place, with high levels of crime and social issues. This could have been due to various factors such as a lack of law enforcement, a large transient population, or other social and economic factors.

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  • 9. 

    What was the general name given to Protestant and Catholic priests who tried to convery Maori to Christianity?

    • A.

      Maori priests

    • B.

      Modernists

    • C.

      Missionaries

    • D.

      Martyrs

    Correct Answer
    C. Missionaries
    Explanation
    Missionaries were the general name given to Protestant and Catholic priests who tried to convert Maori to Christianity. These individuals were sent by religious organizations to spread their faith and teachings among the Maori people. They played a significant role in introducing Christianity to the Maori community and establishing churches and schools. The term "missionaries" accurately describes their purpose and role in attempting to convert the Maori population to Christianity.

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  • 10. 

    The [answer to above question] encouraged a humanitarian approach towards Maori.  What does this tell us about interaction between Pakeha and Maori

    • A.

      That some Pakeha priests were keen for Maori to be treated equally and fairly

    • B.

      That some Pakeha priests were keen for Maori to be treated as second class citizens

    Correct Answer
    A. That some Pakeha priests were keen for Maori to be treated equally and fairly
    Explanation
    This suggests that there were Pakeha priests who advocated for equal and fair treatment of Maori. They believed in promoting a humanitarian approach towards the Maori people, emphasizing the importance of treating them with equality and fairness. This implies that there was a positive interaction between Pakeha and Maori, at least among some Pakeha priests who were supportive of the Maori cause.

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  • 11. 

    Why did 13 Maori chiefs ask King William IV for protection in 1831?

    • A.

      Increasing prostitution and drunkeness amongst whalers

    • B.

      Fear of Australian invasion

    • C.

      Fear of French invasion of New Zealand

    • D.

      Increasing lawlessness and fear of French annexation

    Correct Answer
    D. Increasing lawlessness and fear of French annexation
    Explanation
    In 1831, 13 Maori chiefs asked King William IV for protection due to increasing lawlessness and fear of French annexation. The Maori chiefs were concerned about the rising levels of lawlessness in New Zealand, which included prostitution and drunkenness amongst whalers. Additionally, they were worried about the possibility of French invasion and the annexation of New Zealand by the French. Seeking protection from the British monarchy was seen as a way to maintain order and prevent foreign occupation.

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  • 12. 

    What was created in 1835?

    • A.

      Declaration of Nationality

    • B.

      Declaration of Independence

    • C.

      Declaration of Peace

    Correct Answer
    B. Declaration of Independence
    Explanation
    The correct answer is "Declaration of Independence." In 1835, the Declaration of Independence was created. This document, adopted by the Second Continental Congress on July 4, 1776, proclaimed the thirteen American colonies as independent states, no longer under British rule. It declared the United States of America as a new nation, outlining the principles of liberty, equality, and self-governance that would shape its future. The Declaration of Independence is a significant milestone in American history and a foundational document for the country's democracy.

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