Business Comprehension Passage MCQ Quiz! Trivia

20 Questions | Total Attempts: 143

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Reading Comprehension Quizzes & Trivia

Questions and Answers
  • 1. 
    Choose the meaning that is closest to the meaning of the verb underlined. The teacher had her class writie a composition.
    • A. 

      Gave them no choice

    • B. 

      Persuaded them

    • C. 

      Requested them to do this

  • 2. 
    * Choose the meaning that is closest to the meaning of the verb underlined. Mrs. Wilson made the children wash their hands before dinner.
    • A. 

      Gave them no choice

    • B. 

      Persuaded them

    • C. 

      Requested them to do this

  • 3. 
    * Read the descriptions of some TV news programs. Choose the correct words and phrases. < Regional Recap > Are you addicted to the news? This Friday morning program features all of your favorite stories from the previous week, so you can enjoy them all again. Especially useful for busy people who didn’t catch all of the details of their favorite stories during the week. < All news is Good News! > If you need to (1) _______ from negative news stories, you’ll appreciate our coverage of only positive stories. We (2) ________ stories about success, lucky breaks, and ordinary people who have become heroes in their communities. Join us for our daily message of hope and happiness. Q) Fill the blank 1)
    • A. 

      Underlying

    • B. 

      Get the scoop on

    • C. 

      Coverage

    • D. 

      Take a break

    • E. 

      Catch

  • 4. 
    < All news is Good News! > If you need to (1) _______ from negative news stories, you’ll appreciate our coverage of only positive stories. We (2) ________ stories about success, lucky breaks, and ordinary people who have become heroes in their communities. Join us for our daily message of hope and happiness. Q) Fill the blank (2)
    • A. 

      Underlying

    • B. 

      Get the scoop on

    • C. 

      Coverage

    • D. 

      Take a break

    • E. 

      Catch

  • 5. 
    < All news is Good News! > If you need to (1) _______ from negative news stories, you’ll appreciate our coverage of only positive stories. We (2) ________ stories about success, lucky breaks, and ordinary people who have become heroes in their communities. Join us for our daily message of hope and happiness. Q) Fill the blank 3)
    • A. 

      Underlying

    • B. 

      Get the scoop on

    • C. 

      Coverage

    • D. 

      Take a break

    • E. 

      Catch

  • 6. 
    < The San Andreas Fault > Chapter 1: Southern and central segments. Chapter 2: Northern Segments Chapter 3: Notable Earthquakes Chapter 4: Scientific Research Chapter 5: Pop Culture Reference Chapter 6: The Next Big one. Q) The reader is looking for a description of the 1906 San Francisco earthquake. The reader would probably find this information most quickly and easily by looking first in which part of the book?
    • A. 

      Chapter one

    • B. 

      Chapter three

    • C. 

      Chapter five

    • D. 

      Chapter six

  • 7. 
    Choose one sentence which is not relate to the main idea of the passage. The discovery of America was an accident. It was the result of Europe’s desire for trade with China and India. In 1492, Christopher Columbus set out under the flag of Spain to find a direct sea route to the rich trading areas of the Far East. (1) He hoped to find a shorter route to China and India. (2) So he sailed due west across the Atlantic. (3) Instead, he found two huge continents that were until then unknown to Europe. (4) They blocked his way to the Far East. (5) These two continents were North America and South America.
    • A. 

      (1)

    • B. 

      (2)

    • C. 

      (3)

    • D. 

      (4)

    • E. 

      (5)

  • 8. 
    * Read the passage and answer the question. It is easy to say, “Enlarge your vocabulary: first, that you may enter upon the privileges of a cultivated person: and second, that you may be able to to tell the truth easily and accurately.” But it is another and more difficult matter to prescribe the means by which this is to be done. Every student must, to a large degree, work out his or her own method. the reading of the best books and conversation with cultivated people are both helps to the free use of words. The dictionary is the best friend for your task. Never allow a strange word to pass unchallenged. Usually, it is wide to look it up at the moment. If that is impossible, it must be written firmly on the memory and traced at the first opportunity. It is good to encourage in yourself the habit of dawdling a little over the dictionary. It is the only place where dawdling reaps a harvest. To learn two new words a day-thoroughly to learn them, so that their use will not have a foreign accent-is to insure a large vocabulary before you reach middle age. Q) The paragraph states that you can enlarge your vocabulary by:
    • A. 

      Any means possible.

    • B. 

      Using the dictionary often.

    • C. 

      Accepting the privileges of a cultivated person.

    • D. 

      Developing your memory.

  • 9. 
    * Read the passage and answer the question. Talking with a young man about success and a career, Doctor Samuel Johnson advised the youth to “know something about everything, and everything about something.” The advice was good--in Doctor Johnson’s day, when London was an isolated village, and it took a week to get the news from Paris, Rome, and Berlin. Today, if a man were to take all knowledge for his province and try to know something about everything, the allotment of time would give one minute to each subject, and soon the youth would flit from topic to topic as a butterfly from flower to flower, and life would be about as evanescent as the butterfly, that lives for the present honey and moment. Today commercial, literary, or inventive success means concentration. Q) In order to be successful, the writer would probably advise youth:  
    • A. 

      To act more seriously and live life day to day.

    • B. 

      To spend more time studying subjects they like.

    • C. 

      To know something about everything only.

    • D. 

      To concentrate and specialize in one area.

  • 10. 
    * Read the passage and answer the question. Chemical weapons were first used by Germany during World War 1. Britain, France, and the United States soon followed suit. Soldiers suffocated in poisonous clouds of chlorine; when the gas mask was invented, combatants deployed the more pervasive and persistent mustard gas, which caused severe blistering, clouded eyes, seared lungs, and if the victim survived, a greater chance of developing cancer. Immediately following the war, members of the League of Nations began formulating a comprehensive international ban on chemical weapons, although many signatories reserved the right to produce them as a retaliatory measure. The United States did not add its signature until fifty years later, in 1975. Q) We can conclude from the last sentence that the United States:
    • A. 

      Suffered more than most countries in chemical warfare.

    • B. 

      Was reluctant to give up its right to produce chemical weapons.

    • C. 

      Waited until all countries signed the 1925 Geneva Protocol.

    • D. 

      Detested war and all its horrible weapons.

  • 11. 
    [ Question 12-15 ] Read the passage below and answer the FOUR questions that follow. Before one begins to read an unfamiliar work of literature, it is often helpful to know what kind of work it is--that is, what genre it belongs to. If we know what expectations we should have, we are less likely to misunderstand what the author is trying to accomplish. The Lord of the Rings is a work of fiction written in the middle of this century about a world that greatly resembles medieval times in Europe. It is unmistakably a novel, yet the real significance of the events and the characters will be clearer to readers who know something about the literary tradition, or genre, called the epic, and who have read, for example, The Odyssey or Beowulf. Moreover, there is a special kind of pleasure in the recognition of familiar patterns of events and characterization, which are varied and even deliberately reversed. The skillful interplay of a great storyteller like Tolkien. No one, of course, knows exactly what the Middle Ages were really like, but readers get an illusion in The Lord of the Rings of being in an ancient world which is in some mysterious way part of the history of our own world. Then, after the fashion of the epic tradition, they will expect that the story will follow the movements of a particular person who is of heroic stature (physically and mentally) and who embodies the ideals and values of a particular people. Readers feel sure that the hero will, like the heroes in The Odyssey and Beowulf, go on a journey and experience a variety of adventures, which he will survive after many hardships and will then return to his own home and people. Q) Which of the following is probably the intended audience for this passage?
    • A. 

      Students of the Middle Ages

    • B. 

      Those preparing to read The Odyssey

    • C. 

      Those preparing to read The Lord of the Rings

    • D. 

      Those preparing to read Beowulf

  • 12. 
    [ Question 12-15 ] Before one begins to read an unfamiliar work of literature, it is often helpful to know what kind of work it is--that is, what genre it belongs to. If we know what expectations we should have, we are less likely to misunderstand what the author is trying to accomplish. The Lord of the Rings is a work of fiction written in the middle of this century about a world that greatly resembles medieval times in Europe. It is unmistakably a novel, yet the real significance of the events and the characters will be clearer to readers who know something about the literary tradition, or genre, called the epic, and who have read, for example, The Odyssey or Beowulf. Moreover, there is a special kind of pleasure in the recognition of familiar patterns of events and characterization, which are varied and even deliberately reversed. The skillful interplay of a great storyteller like Tolkien. No one, of course, knows exactly what the Middle Ages were really like, but readers get an illusion in The Lord of the Rings of being in an ancient world which is in some mysterious way part of the history of our own world. Then, after the fashion of the epic tradition, they will expect that the story will follow the movements of a particular person who is of heroic stature (physically and mentally) and who embodies the ideals and values of a particular people. Readers feel sure that the hero will, like the heroes in The Odyssey and Beowulf, go on a journey and experience a variety of adventures, which he will survive after many hardships and will then return to his own home and people. Q) The central point of the passage is best summarized as follows:
    • A. 

      The heroes in Tolkien's story are identical to those in The Odyssey or Beowulf.

    • B. 

      Ons should read familiar works of literature before reading and unfamiliar one.

    • C. 

      The history of the ancient world is related to the history of our own world.

    • D. 

      Fully appreciating The Lord of the Rings involves familiarity with the epic tradition.

  • 13. 
    [ Question 12-15 ] Before one begins to read an unfamiliar work of literature, it is often helpful to know what kind of work it is--that is, what genre it belongs to. If we know what expectations we should have, we are less likely to misunderstand what the author is trying to accomplish. The Lord of the Rings is a work of fiction written in the middle of this century about a world that greatly resembles medieval times in Europe. It is unmistakably a novel, yet the real significance of the events and the characters will be clearer to readers who know something about the literary tradition, or genre, called the epic, and who have read, for example, The Odyssey or Beowulf. Moreover, there is a special kind of pleasure in the recognition of familiar patterns of events and characterization, which are varied and even deliberately reversed. The skillful interplay of a great storyteller like Tolkien. No one, of course, knows exactly what the Middle Ages were really like, but readers get an illusion in The Lord of the Rings of being in an ancient world which is in some mysterious way part of the history of our own world. Then, after the fashion of the epic tradition, they will expect that the story will follow the movements of a particular person who is of heroic stature (physically and mentally) and who embodies the ideals and values of a particular people. Readers feel sure that the hero will, like the heroes in The Odyssey and Beowulf, go on a journey and experience a variety of adventures, which he will survive after many hardships and will then return to his own home and people. Q) The author implies which of the following about the conclusion of The Lord of the Rings?
    • A. 

      It is a happy one.

    • B. 

      It is a unique one.

    • C. 

      It has been plagiarized.

    • D. 

      It is very much like the opening of the novel.

  • 14. 
    [ Question 12-15 ] Before one begins to read an unfamiliar work of literature, it is often helpful to know what kind of work it is--that is, what genre it belongs to. If we know what expectations we should have, we are less likely to misunderstand what the author is trying to accomplish. The Lord of the Rings is a work of fiction written in the middle of this century about a world that greatly resembles medieval times in Europe. It is unmistakably a novel, yet the real significance of the events and the characters will be clearer to readers who know something about the literary tradition, or genre, called the epic, and who have read, for example, The Odyssey or Beowulf. Moreover, there is a special kind of pleasure in the recognition of familiar patterns of events and characterization, which are varied and even deliberately reversed. The skillful interplay of a great storyteller like Tolkien. No one, of course, knows exactly what the Middle Ages were really like, but readers get an illusion in The Lord of the Rings of being in an ancient world which is in some mysterious way part of the history of our own world. Then, after the fashion of the epic tradition, they will expect that the story will follow the movements of a particular person who is of heroic stature (physically and mentally) and who embodies the ideals and values of a particular people. Readers feel sure that the hero will, like the heroes in The Odyssey and Beowulf, go on a journey and experience a variety of adventures, which he will survive after many hardships and will then return to his own home and people. Q) It may be inferred that readers who expect The Lord of the Rings to contain elements of the epic tradition will:
    • A. 

      Have a background that the author of this passage does not share.

    • B. 

      Have ignored this passage.

    • C. 

      Have misread this passage.

    • D. 

      Have their expectations fulfilled.

  • 15. 
    Topic E. Business (major: accounting, marketing, management, and economics) [ TEXT ] (1) During the early 1990s, companies rushed to implement large-volume output technology, including a rapid changeover to a new manufacturing process designed to produce massive quantities of identical high-quality goods at a low cost per unit. As such the stages of assembly were standardized, utilizing precision-made, interchangeable parts and factories carefully reorganized to allow the flow of raw materials through a set of sequential steps. These innovations caused great advancement in the American automobile industry in particular, most notably by carmaker Henry Ford. His business strategies with underlying mass production philosophy prompted an automobile boom, elevating the entire country into an economic upswing. (2) Originally, Ford’s company was staffed with professional engineers who were trained in ever aspect of building internal combustion engines and designing the framework for the vehicles, and thus, the office was based on stationary production points wherein assistants would carry necessary parts for each car. Ford’s implementation of an assembly line, however, broke the manufacturing up into a lot of small steps; employees stood side-by-side, concentrating on their individual task, as the materials rolled along a conveyor belt. The amount of training needed to carry out only one job, as opposed to many, was minimal, and the company was able to replace highly skilled employees with men who were unskilled or semi-skilled and therefore inexpensive to employ. In addition to saving him money on payroll, the transition also reduced the manufacturing time by assigning easily perfected repetitive chores. Together, these two changes resulted in a startling increase in productivity without compromising quality. (3) On the whole, the new manufacturing methods dramatically modified the organization of the workplace, altering the concept of the American factory environment. Whereas the previous industrial model ensured that engineers had interesting whole projects to work on, as well as continued education, an assembly line demanded a minute division of labor, each person performing a single tedious task. Laborers quickly became bored of their jobs and lost interest, threatening to bring down the value of their end products. Ford, realizing that his new factory necessitated a strict monitoring of employee output to assure quality and quantity were maintained, established a hierarchical system of supervisors to maintain productivity at peak output levels, and encouraged the many professionals who had initially lost their engineering jobs to join the higher ranks of the now rigid and controlled company structure. (4) The triumph of the Ford plants had a revolutionary effect on the collective industry as well as inspiring newer peripheral industries to develop in order to accommodate increased automobile production. After all, assembly lines required raw materials for input, so steel mills, glass factories, and metal foundries sprang up in clusters close to huge manufacturing plants. At the same time, machine tool and die makers who provided all the precision parts and mechanical devices for the factory infrastructure flourished as technology continued to improve, the offshoots of which reared a range of new and exciting careers, particularly of interest to the large groups of young men returning from military duty around this time, and kept unemployment rates down while boosting overall spending. In the end, this booming economy together with better automation allowed Ford to dtop his selling price from about $850 in 1908 to less than $300 in 1925, at which time sales figures skyrocketed as average customers could now afford to purchase a vehicle, feeding back into the overall health of companies that were involved with car making. (5) The mounting popularity of personal transportation ultimately had repercussions on the cities and countryside as they rapidly changed to make room for the astounding increase in cars. Dirt roads were replaced with paved streets and freeways while urban developers hurried to design gutters, curbs, traffic signs. and other infrastructure that was previously unnecessary. Leisure time now circled around car ownership, bringing forth entertainment venues such as the drive-in theater or touring on newly constructed highways with accompanying gas stations rest stops, billboards, and even motel to lodge weary travelers along the way. The entire cultural landscape was altered to focus on driving and the needs of the automobile consumer, the impact of which has had major reverberations on the economic survival of the country. E-16. The word implement in the paragraph 1 is closest in meaning to  
    • A. 

      Perform

    • B. 

      Rescind

    • C. 

      Retool

    • D. 

      Cleave

  • 16. 
    Topic E. Business (major: accounting, marketing, management, and economics) E-17. According to the passage, the introduction of an assembly line brought about all of the following EXCEPT  
    • A. 

      A reduction in the time needed to produce goods

    • B. 

      A period of working hours that was shortened

    • C. 

      A manufacturing process with many small stages

    • D. 

      A decrease in the personnel expenses

  • 17. 
    Topic E. Business (major: accounting, marketing, management, and economics) E-18. According to paragraph 3, Henry Ford adopted a supervisor system in order to
    • A. 

      Provide employment for skilled engineers who lost their jobs.

    • B. 

      Keep the output and caliber of merchandise high.

    • C. 

      Educate and train workers for minute tasks.

    • D. 

      Elevate the status of professionals in the company.

  • 18. 
    Topic E. Business (major: accounting, marketing, management, and economics) E-19. Which of the sentences below best expresses the essential information in the highlighted sentence in paragraph 5?
    • A. 

      The dramatic expansion of the transportation network ensured that the new entertainment facilities had easy access to drivers.

    • B. 

      Many new business cropped up in order to accommodate the new population whose recreation activities revolved around their cars.

    • C. 

      The increase in the number of privately-owned vehicles resulted in the expansion of the tertiary sector of the economy.

    • D. 

      The increasing focus on cars led to the development of many new and profitable service industries along the highway.

  • 19. 
    Topic E. Business (major: accounting, marketing, management, and economics) E-20. Complete the summary by selecting the three answer choices that express the most important ideas in the passage. The automobile boom in America uplifted the economy susbtantially. 1) 2) 3)
    • A. 

      Ford used professional engineers to make sure the high quality of his product.

    • B. 

      Mass production methods significantly decreased the cost of new automobile in the mid 1920s.

    • C. 

      Ford’s use of the assembly line greatly improved productivity in the workplace.

    • D. 

      The increased use of private automobile caused related business sectors to be developed.

    • E. 

      The need for superintendence led to the institution of a hierarchy in factories.

    • F. 

      The application of the assembly line had a major effect on the layout and structure of factories.

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