How Research Savvy Are You?

8 Questions | Total Attempts: 70

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How Research Savvy Are You?

The research process is complicated and rewarding. It requires you to demonstrate preparation, planning, and critical-thinking skills. This short quiz will test you on a few key concepts important to research success.


Questions and Answers
  • 1. 
    Why do you think it would be beneficial to sit down and think about what you already know about a topic before you start your research? Check all that apply.
    • A. 

      Thinking about what you know will help you create a hypothesis.

    • B. 

      It will not help you at all.

    • C. 

      Even though it may take some time upfront, it will you save time in the end because this will help you develop a thorough research strategy.

    • D. 

      Thinking about what you already know will help you find keywords and subject headings that can help you find relevant sources.

  • 2. 
    Which of the following is not a hypothesis?
    • A. 

      What are the divorce rates in New York City?

    • B. 

      Divorce rates in New York State are higher than in Michigan because people work longer hours.

    • C. 

      Couples married in the 1970s and earlier have lower divorce rates than those couples married in the 1980s and after because they have different values regarding marriage.

    • D. 

      Couples who seek therapy during separation are less likely to get divorced than couples who do not.

  • 3. 
    What is the purpose of creating a list of related questions when doing a research project? 
    • A. 

      To make sure you get as many resources as possible to read through before you start your research paper.

    • B. 

      To make more work for yourself.

    • C. 

      Having a list of related questions will help you find supporting detail for your main argument.

  • 4. 
    When searching in a library catalog/OPAC or database, what are some things you should consider when beginning your research?  Check all that apply. 
    • A. 

      You should know whether or not you need to use scholarly sources in your research project.

    • B. 

      You should have a list of keywords and/or subject headings.

    • C. 

      You should ask your librarian about library resources that can help you with your research.

    • D. 

      You should have looked through search engines to make sure you cannot find something better there, first.

  • 5. 
    What do we mean when we say supporting detail?
    • A. 

      Facts, statistics, and pieces of information that support the main idea(s) in text.

    • B. 

      Information in a text that is interesting, but not that important.

    • C. 

      It is another name for citations.

    • D. 

      Page numbers and other information that helps you locate material within a text.

  • 6. 
    Why is it important to review your work before you hand it in? Check all that apply.
    • A. 

      You need to make sure that you have enough supporting details to help back your main idea(s).

    • B. 

      People reading my work may not take my ideas and opinions seriously if I have spelling and grammatical errors.

    • C. 

      You need to check your paper for length.

    • D. 

      You need to make sure that the paper is written for the intended audience.

  • 7. 
    Why is it important to reflect on your research strategy?
    • A. 

      It is not necessary to review your research strategy.

    • B. 

      You should review your research strategy so you can reflect on what worked and what did not, so that you can improve your process the next time around.

    • C. 

      You need to reflect on your process so that you can re-use this paper if you are ever assigned a similar project.

  • 8. 
    Which of the following is a benefit of expressing your argument and research through a paper over a presentation? 
    • A. 

      The paper is the best choice if you want your argument and research to reach a wide audience.

    • B. 

      The paper is the best choice if you want to go into great depth and detail with your argument and your research.

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