UGC NET June 2014 Model Practice Set Paper – 1 (General Paper On Teaching And Research Aptitude)

50 Questions | Total Attempts: 2990

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UGC NET Quizzes & Trivia

Questions and Answers
  • 1. 
    Which of among is/are not part/parts of the amendment/amendments to the UGC Regulations 2010? (i) Academic performance Indicators (APIs) will be used to finalize selection process. (ii) Maximum 15% of the total APIs will be from attending press conferences, seminars, etc. (iii) Teachers will be assessed annually through the Performance Based Appraisal System (PBAS) which is based on APIs. (iv) Teachers will be assessed annually through the Performance Based Appraisal System (PBAS) which is not based on APIs.
    • A. 

      Only (iv)

    • B. 

      (i) & (iv) both

    • C. 

      Only (iii)

    • D. 

      None of the above

  • 2. 
    Which one is not the type of a university?
    • A. 

      Central University

    • B. 

      State University

    • C. 

      Crown University

    • D. 

      Deemed University

  • 3. 
    International Mother Earth Day observed across the world on:-
    • A. 

      20 April 2014

    • B. 

      21 April 2014

    • C. 

      22 April 2014

    • D. 

      23 April 2014

  • 4. 
    Which of the following is not the part of External Administration and Control?
    • A. 

      Central Government

    • B. 

      State Government

    • C. 

      Education Commission

    • D. 

      Private Agencies

  • 5. 
    How many members are there within the composition of University Grants Commission?
    • A. 

      16

    • B. 

      18

    • C. 

      12

    • D. 

      10

  • 6. 
    Which is not the branch of ecology?
    • A. 

      Macro-ecology

    • B. 

      Micro-ecology

    • C. 

      Synecology

    • D. 

      Autoecology

  • 7. 
    Which is responsible for Green House Effect?
    • A. 

      Increasing volume of CO

    • B. 

      Increasing volume of CO2

    • C. 

      Increasing volume of CO2+CH4

    • D. 

      Increasing volume of CH4

  • 8. 
    The Supreme Court of India has directed that woman employee of the central government can get an uninterrupted leave for ________ years for childcare and it includes needs like examination and sickness?
    • A. 

      One

    • B. 

      Two

    • C. 

      Three

    • D. 

      Four

  • 9. 
    Hero MotoCorp on 21 April 2014 announced that it has entered Bangladesh in two wheeler segment through a joint venture of 55:45 with a Bangladesh firm. Name it?
    • A. 

      Tagaz

    • B. 

      Aftab Automobiles

    • C. 

      Nitol Niloy

    • D. 

      Walton Hi-Tech Industries

  • 10. 
    Who is being called as the ‘Father of Ecology in India”?
    • A. 

      P. Maheshwari

    • B. 

      S. K. Kashyap

    • C. 

      Ramdev Mishra

    • D. 

      B. P. Pal

  • 11. 
    The Chariman of Rajya Sabha, Hamid Ansari in April 2014 administered oath to four members as Rajya Sabha member on four vacant seats of Odisha in his Chamber in Parliament House. One of the four members who took the oath of the Upper House of the Parliament is also a Chairman of IPL, name him?
    • A. 

      AU Singh Deo

    • B. 

      Kalpataru Das

    • C. 

      Sarojini Hembram

    • D. 

      Ranjib Biswal

  • 12. 
    Where does a computer add and compare its data?
    • A. 

      CPU

    • B. 

      Memory

    • C. 

      Hard Disk

    • D. 

      Floppy Disk

  • 13. 
    Computer is not being used in education as
    • A. 

      An equipment

    • B. 

      An interactive teaching tool

    • C. 

      A management tool

    • D. 

      An assessment

  • 14. 
    Which are not the computer sub-systems?
    • A. 

      Software

    • B. 

      Hardware

    • C. 

      Applicationware

    • D. 

      Humanware

  • 15. 
    Who on 20 April 2014 won the Monte Carlo Masters Tennis?
    • A. 

      Roger Federer

    • B. 

      Stanislas Wawrinka

    • C. 

      Bob Bryan

    • D. 

      Ivan Dodi

  • 16. 
    Which of following is not the category of barriers in communication?
    • A. 

      Expressional Barriers

    • B. 

      Physical Barriers

    • C. 

      Psychological Barriers

    • D. 

      Language Barriers

  • 17. 
    Main objective of F.M. station in radio is-
    • A. 

      Information, Entertainment and Tourism

    • B. 

      Entertainment, Information and Interaction

    • C. 

      Tourism, Interaction and Entertainment

    • D. 

      Entertainment only

  • 18. 
    Effective communication occurs only if
    • A. 

      Source is charming and beautiful

    • B. 

      Message has been designed according to audiences

    • C. 

      Latest communication tool has been used

    • D. 

      Message receiver is inactive to receive

  • 19. 
    Which of the following is not the function of communication?
    • A. 

      Decentralization of rights

    • B. 

      Establishing good relationship

    • C. 

      Individual growth

    • D. 

      Integration

  • 20. 
    According to Legons, communication means
    • A. 

      Exchange of ideas

    • B. 

      Exchange of facts

    • C. 

      Exchange of feelings

    • D. 

      All of the above

  • 21. 
    Instructions: Read the following paragraph carefully the answer the next five questions (21-25) based on the same. Corruption in India is has been a problem ever since the country had been having a multilayered administration by officers, ministers and other administrative chiefs. The corruption problem in ancient India, coupled with bribery, kept infesting the society more and more in an increasing rate. This is quite clear from the way the contemporary writers like Ksemendra and Kalhana have condemned the government officials, as well as other employees of different levels, in their celebrated works. Ksemendra in his Dasavataracaritam has advised the king to remove all the officials, ministers, generals and priests from office with immediate effect, who were either taking bribes themselves or have been indulging in corruption in some other way. Yet another work by Ksemendra, called Narmamala, depicts corruption bribery spreading fast like rampant maladies. He also found an answer to the much discussed question how to stop corruption in India of his time; he has explicitly addressed the contemporary intelligentsia to step forward and shoulder the responsibility of purging their folks. Kalhana too was merciless in his condemnation of the corrupt government officers in India of his own time. He damned the officials outright and asked the king to stay alert from their evil entente. Kalhana has also cited some examples of top incidents of corruption in India of his days. He said that Bijja became even richer than the kind as he sought to unfair means of getting money, while Ananda managed to achieve a high post in the office by bribing his higher officials. Embezzlements in India was just the same problem in the yesteryears as they are now, mostly among the police and administrative officers. In fact, Kautilya has given a detailed list, referring to not less than forty ways of embezzlement that the treasury officers in his time were used to practice. The most common of them were pratibandha or obstruction, prayoga or loan, vyavahara or trading, avastara or fabrication of accounts, pariahapana or causing less revenue and thereby affecting the treasury, upabhoga or embezzling funds for self enjoyment, and apahara or defalcation. And he uses a nice metaphor too – just like one cannot resist tasting the drop of honey or poison on the tip of the tongue, a government servant can never resist devouring even a bit of the government revenue. Again, we cannot confirm if a fish under water is drinking water or not; similarly, ascertaining the bribery, corruption and embezzlement on the part of government officials and policemen were equally impossible. And no wonder, this huge amount of embezzlement in different spheres of the administration and in varied degrees led to the piling up of a huge amount of black money in Indian market in the age of the Arthasastra; nevertheless, we would not enquire into that in detail and make this article unnecessarily long. In brief, that caused all the similar problems we find today, including sudden and unpredictable hikes in the prices of essential goods. It would have been quite interesting to address the issue under the present economic circumstances of the present day India, but the scope of this article would ask to better leave that out. Which of the following is true according to the passage? I. Corruption is like a rampant disease which spreads like an epidemic. II. The main cause of corruption was bribes asked by administrative officers in ancient India.
    • A. 

      Only I

    • B. 

      Only II

    • C. 

      Both I and II

    • D. 

      Neither I nor II

  • 22. 
    Instructions: Read the following paragraph carefully the answer the next five questions (21-25) based on the same. Corruption in India is has been a problem ever since the country had been having a multilayered administration by officers, ministers and other administrative chiefs. The corruption problem in ancient India, coupled with bribery, kept infesting the society more and more in an increasing rate. This is quite clear from the way the contemporary writers like Ksemendra and Kalhana have condemned the government officials, as well as other employees of different levels, in their celebrated works. Ksemendra in his Dasavataracaritam has advised the king to remove all the officials, ministers, generals and priests from office with immediate effect, who were either taking bribes themselves or have been indulging in corruption in some other way. Yet another work by Ksemendra, called Narmamala, depicts corruption bribery spreading fast like rampant maladies. He also found an answer to the much discussed question how to stop corruption in India of his time; he has explicitly addressed the contemporary intelligentsia to step forward and shoulder the responsibility of purging their folks. Kalhana too was merciless in his condemnation of the corrupt government officers in India of his own time. He damned the officials outright and asked the king to stay alert from their evil entente. Kalhana has also cited some examples of top incidents of corruption in India of his days. He said that Bijja became even richer than the kind as he sought to unfair means of getting money, while Ananda managed to achieve a high post in the office by bribing his higher officials. Embezzlements in India was just the same problem in the yesteryears as they are now, mostly among the police and administrative officers. In fact, Kautilya has given a detailed list, referring to not less than forty ways of embezzlement that the treasury officers in his time were used to practice. The most common of them were pratibandha or obstruction, prayoga or loan, vyavahara or trading, avastara or fabrication of accounts, pariahapana or causing less revenue and thereby affecting the treasury, upabhoga or embezzling funds for self enjoyment, and apahara or defalcation. And he uses a nice metaphor too – just like one cannot resist tasting the drop of honey or poison on the tip of the tongue, a government servant can never resist devouring even a bit of the government revenue. Again, we cannot confirm if a fish under water is drinking water or not; similarly, ascertaining the bribery, corruption and embezzlement on the part of government officials and policemen were equally impossible. And no wonder, this huge amount of embezzlement in different spheres of the administration and in varied degrees led to the piling up of a huge amount of black money in Indian market in the age of the Arthasastra; nevertheless, we would not enquire into that in detail and make this article unnecessarily long. In brief, that caused all the similar problems we find today, including sudden and unpredictable hikes in the prices of essential goods. It would have been quite interesting to address the issue under the present economic circumstances of the present day India, but the scope of this article would ask to better leave that out. What are the problems caused due to embezzlement? I. Black money II. Price rise III. Increase in bribery IV. Delayed justice
    • A. 

      II and III

    • B. 

      I and II

    • C. 

      I, III and IV

    • D. 

      All of these

  • 23. 
    Instructions: Read the following paragraph carefully the answer the next five questions (21-25) based on the same. Corruption in India is has been a problem ever since the country had been having a multilayered administration by officers, ministers and other administrative chiefs. The corruption problem in ancient India, coupled with bribery, kept infesting the society more and more in an increasing rate. This is quite clear from the way the contemporary writers like Ksemendra and Kalhana have condemned the government officials, as well as other employees of different levels, in their celebrated works. Ksemendra in his Dasavataracaritam has advised the king to remove all the officials, ministers, generals and priests from office with immediate effect, who were either taking bribes themselves or have been indulging in corruption in some other way. Yet another work by Ksemendra, called Narmamala, depicts corruption bribery spreading fast like rampant maladies. He also found an answer to the much discussed question how to stop corruption in India of his time; he has explicitly addressed the contemporary intelligentsia to step forward and shoulder the responsibility of purging their folks. Kalhana too was merciless in his condemnation of the corrupt government officers in India of his own time. He damned the officials outright and asked the king to stay alert from their evil entente. Kalhana has also cited some examples of top incidents of corruption in India of his days. He said that Bijja became even richer than the kind as he sought to unfair means of getting money, while Ananda managed to achieve a high post in the office by bribing his higher officials. Embezzlements in India was just the same problem in the yesteryears as they are now, mostly among the police and administrative officers. In fact, Kautilya has given a detailed list, referring to not less than forty ways of embezzlement that the treasury officers in his time were used to practice. The most common of them were pratibandha or obstruction, prayoga or loan, vyavahara or trading, avastara or fabrication of accounts, pariahapana or causing less revenue and thereby affecting the treasury, upabhoga or embezzling funds for self enjoyment, and apahara or defalcation. And he uses a nice metaphor too – just like one cannot resist tasting the drop of honey or poison on the tip of the tongue, a government servant can never resist devouring even a bit of the government revenue. Again, we cannot confirm if a fish under water is drinking water or not; similarly, ascertaining the bribery, corruption and embezzlement on the part of government officials and policemen were equally impossible. And no wonder, this huge amount of embezzlement in different spheres of the administration and in varied degrees led to the piling up of a huge amount of black money in Indian market in the age of the Arthasastra; nevertheless, we would not enquire into that in detail and make this article unnecessarily long. In brief, that caused all the similar problems we find today, including sudden and unpredictable hikes in the prices of essential goods. It would have been quite interesting to address the issue under the present economic circumstances of the present day India, but the scope of this article would ask to better leave that out. What does the author seems to suggest?
    • A. 

      Corruption cannot be eliminated from Indian society.

    • B. 

      We should use ancient ways to fight corruption.

    • C. 

      Corruption is a historical enemy.

    • D. 

      Corruption can be eliminated if tackled in an organized manner.

  • 24. 
    Instructions: Read the following paragraph carefully the answer the next five questions (21-25) based on the same. Corruption in India is has been a problem ever since the country had been having a multilayered administration by officers, ministers and other administrative chiefs. The corruption problem in ancient India, coupled with bribery, kept infesting the society more and more in an increasing rate. This is quite clear from the way the contemporary writers like Ksemendra and Kalhana have condemned the government officials, as well as other employees of different levels, in their celebrated works. Ksemendra in his Dasavataracaritam has advised the king to remove all the officials, ministers, generals and priests from office with immediate effect, who were either taking bribes themselves or have been indulging in corruption in some other way. Yet another work by Ksemendra, called Narmamala, depicts corruption bribery spreading fast like rampant maladies. He also found an answer to the much discussed question how to stop corruption in India of his time; he has explicitly addressed the contemporary intelligentsia to step forward and shoulder the responsibility of purging their folks. Kalhana too was merciless in his condemnation of the corrupt government officers in India of his own time. He damned the officials outright and asked the king to stay alert from their evil entente. Kalhana has also cited some examples of top incidents of corruption in India of his days. He said that Bijja became even richer than the kind as he sought to unfair means of getting money, while Ananda managed to achieve a high post in the office by bribing his higher officials. Embezzlements in India was just the same problem in the yesteryears as they are now, mostly among the police and administrative officers. In fact, Kautilya has given a detailed list, referring to not less than forty ways of embezzlement that the treasury officers in his time were used to practice. The most common of them were pratibandha or obstruction, prayoga or loan, vyavahara or trading, avastara or fabrication of accounts, pariahapana or causing less revenue and thereby affecting the treasury, upabhoga or embezzling funds for self enjoyment, and apahara or defalcation. And he uses a nice metaphor too – just like one cannot resist tasting the drop of honey or poison on the tip of the tongue, a government servant can never resist devouring even a bit of the government revenue. Again, we cannot confirm if a fish under water is drinking water or not; similarly, ascertaining the bribery, corruption and embezzlement on the part of government officials and policemen were equally impossible. And no wonder, this huge amount of embezzlement in different spheres of the administration and in varied degrees led to the piling up of a huge amount of black money in Indian market in the age of the Arthasastra; nevertheless, we would not enquire into that in detail and make this article unnecessarily long. In brief, that caused all the similar problems we find today, including sudden and unpredictable hikes in the prices of essential goods. It would have been quite interesting to address the issue under the present economic circumstances of the present day India, but the scope of this article would ask to better leave that out. Which of the following is not correct on basis of the given passage? I. There are incidents available from ancient India where bribe has been offered to get a highest position. II. The problem and practices of corruption are easily traceable in modern era as compared to ancient times. III. Embezzlements of more than 40 types are prevalent in today’s time.
    • A. 

      II and III

    • B. 

      Only I

    • C. 

      Only III

    • D. 

      I and II

  • 25. 
    Instructions: Read the following paragraph carefully the answer the next five questions (21-25) based on the same. Corruption in India is has been a problem ever since the country had been having a multilayered administration by officers, ministers and other administrative chiefs. The corruption problem in ancient India, coupled with bribery, kept infesting the society more and more in an increasing rate. This is quite clear from the way the contemporary writers like Ksemendra and Kalhana have condemned the government officials, as well as other employees of different levels, in their celebrated works. Ksemendra in his Dasavataracaritam has advised the king to remove all the officials, ministers, generals and priests from office with immediate effect, who were either taking bribes themselves or have been indulging in corruption in some other way. Yet another work by Ksemendra, called Narmamala, depicts corruption bribery spreading fast like rampant maladies. He also found an answer to the much discussed question how to stop corruption in India of his time; he has explicitly addressed the contemporary intelligentsia to step forward and shoulder the responsibility of purging their folks. Kalhana too was merciless in his condemnation of the corrupt government officers in India of his own time. He damned the officials outright and asked the king to stay alert from their evil entente. Kalhana has also cited some examples of top incidents of corruption in India of his days. He said that Bijja became even richer than the kind as he sought to unfair means of getting money, while Ananda managed to achieve a high post in the office by bribing his higher officials. Embezzlements in India was just the same problem in the yesteryears as they are now, mostly among the police and administrative officers. In fact, Kautilya has given a detailed list, referring to not less than forty ways of embezzlement that the treasury officers in his time were used to practice. The most common of them were pratibandha or obstruction, prayoga or loan, vyavahara or trading, avastara or fabrication of accounts, pariahapana or causing less revenue and thereby affecting the treasury, upabhoga or embezzling funds for self enjoyment, and apahara or defalcation. And he uses a nice metaphor too – just like one cannot resist tasting the drop of honey or poison on the tip of the tongue, a government servant can never resist devouring even a bit of the government revenue. Again, we cannot confirm if a fish under water is drinking water or not; similarly, ascertaining the bribery, corruption and embezzlement on the part of government officials and policemen were equally impossible. And no wonder, this huge amount of embezzlement in different spheres of the administration and in varied degrees led to the piling up of a huge amount of black money in Indian market in the age of the Arthasastra; nevertheless, we would not enquire into that in detail and make this article unnecessarily long. In brief, that caused all the similar problems we find today, including sudden and unpredictable hikes in the prices of essential goods. It would have been quite interesting to address the issue under the present economic circumstances of the present day India, but the scope of this article would ask to better leave that out. What could have made lengthier to this article?
    • A. 

      Discussion about the black money

    • B. 

      Corruption in the modern age

    • C. 

      Administrative constraints in the system

    • D. 

      None of the above