Salt Marsh, Maritime Forest And Beaches Are Moving Pre-quiz

16 Questions | Total Attempts: 105

SettingsSettingsSettings
Please wait...
Salt Marsh, Maritime Forest And Beaches Are Moving Pre-quiz

Pre-Quiz


Questions and Answers
  • 1. 
    Why do marshes have that characteristically rotten egg odor?
    • A. 

      Decomposition uses much oxygen while releasing hydrogen sulfide. The reduced oxygen level combined with the release of hydrogen sulfide gives the marsh a rotten egg odor.

    • B. 

      Decomposition uses much carbon dioxide while releasing hydrogen sulfide. The reduced carbon dioxide level combined with the release of hydrogen sulfide gives the marsh a rotten egg odor.

    • C. 

      Decomposition uses much hydrogen while releasing carbon dioxide. The reduced hydrogen level combined with the release of carbon dioxide gives the marsh a rotten egg odor.

    • D. 

      Decomposition uses much hydrogen while releasing sulfur. The reduced hydrogen level combined with the release of sulfur gives the marsh a rotten egg odor.

  • 2. 
    Identify this structure:
    • A. 

      Groin

    • B. 

      Jetty

    • C. 

      Seawall

    • D. 

      Breakers

  • 3. 
    How many miles has North Carolina barrier islands migrated to get to its present location?
    • A. 

      40 miles.

    • B. 

      30 miles.

    • C. 

      60 miles.

    • D. 

      1-2 miles.

    • E. 

      Between the swash zone (shoreface where waves break) and the dune

  • 4. 
    Spartina alterniflora (marsh cordgrass) is the most abundant and ecologically most important large plant of the marsh. What makes it so important?
    • A. 

      Salt tolerant

    • B. 

      Grows quickly

    • C. 

      Predator tolerant

    • D. 

      Wind and wave tolerant

  • 5. 
    What is phytoplankton?
    • A. 

      A microscopic plant that moves with currents that organisms feed on.

    • B. 

      A microscopic animal that moves with currents and larger aquatic organisms feed on.

    • C. 

      An organism that helps decompose detritus in the marsh.

    • D. 

      An organism that scavengers feed on in the marsh.

  • 6. 
    Where is oxygen in good supply in the marsh?
    • A. 

      Air

    • B. 

      Tide pools

    • C. 

      Tide line

    • D. 

      Substrate

  • 7. 
    Why do marshes have that characteristically rotten egg odor?
    • A. 

      Decomposition uses much oxygen while releasing hydrogen sulfide. The reduced oxygen level combined with the release of hydrogen sulfide gives the marsh a rotten egg odor.

    • B. 

      Decomposition uses much carbon dioxide while releasing hydrogen sulfide. The reduced carbon dioxide level combined with the release of hydrogen sulfide gives the marsh a rotten egg odor.

    • C. 

      Decomposition uses much hydrogen while releasing carbon dioxide. The reduced hydrogen level combined with the release of carbon dioxide gives the marsh a rotten egg odor.

    • D. 

      Decomposition uses much hydrogen while releasing sulfur. The reduced hydrogen level combined with the release of sulfur gives the marsh a rotten egg odor.

  • 8. 
    Spartina alterniflora (marsh cordgrass) is the most abundant and ecologically most important large plant of the marsh. What makes it so important?
    • A. 

      Salt tolerant

    • B. 

      Grows quickly

    • C. 

      Predator tolerant

    • D. 

      Wind and wave tolerant

  • 9. 
    Because it has a wide variety of plants and animal species occupying a large number of niches, the salt marsh community is one of nature's most self-sustaining ecological systems and is a valuable coastal resource. Being a self-sustaining community means:
    • A. 

      The marsh community supplies virtually all its own needs rather than being dependent on other communities.

    • B. 

      The marsh community is able to provide the nutrients for all other barrier island habitats.

    • C. 

      The marsh community is the basis of the barrier island community.

    • D. 

      The marsh community is fragile and at risk.

  • 10. 
    What are storm bars?
    • A. 

      Storm bars form as storm weather erodes the near shore sand bar and beach in preparation for a storm.

    • B. 

      Storm bars form as storm weather erodes the berm and creates a sand bar during fair weather.

    • C. 

      Storm bars form as the storm sediments overwash the island during a storm.

    • D. 

      Storm bars form as wave strength, duration and fetch expand.

  • 11. 
    What is projected to occur in the year 2100?  North Carolina has been identified as one of the three states with the highest vulnerability to sea level rise. North Carolina has 5900 sq. km of land below 1 meter in elevation, over 300 miles of beaches and more than 4,600 miles of shoreline along our sounds, coastal rivers and wetlands. According to the Calvin Midgett article,  sea level rise on North Carolina's gently sloping coastline equals approximately how many feet of shoreline retreat?
    • A. 

      1 ft of sea level rise equals between 1,000 and 2,000 feet of shoreline retreat.

    • B. 

      1 ft of sea level rise equals 6 feet of shoreline retreat.

    • C. 

      1 ft of sea level rise equals 10,000 feet of shoreline retreat.

    • D. 

      1 ft of sea level rise equals 4.6 feet of shoreline retreat.

  • 12. 
    Why are the Outer Banks so far from the mainland coast of North Carolina?
    • A. 

      With sea level rise, the mainland coastal plain receded faster than the islands are migrated landward.

    • B. 

      The Outer Banks are floating seaward due to migration.

    • C. 

      The Outer Banks are returning to their original location further out on the continental shelf.

    • D. 

      Sound waters in the basin behind the Outer Banks are filling with sand causing the islands to roll seaward.

  • 13. 
    What does this photo show about a barrier island maritime forest?
    • A. 

      That a maritime forest is found in the middle of the widest part of an island.

    • B. 

      That barrier islands are long and thin.

    • C. 

      That a dune is not found on the sound side of an island.

    • D. 

      That the island hasn't much shade from the sun.

  • 14. 
    What is phytoplankton?
    • A. 

      A microscopic plant that organisms feed on and move with tides and currents.

    • B. 

      A microscopic animal that moves with currents and large aquatic organisms.

    • C. 

      An organism that helps decompose detritus in the marsh.

    • D. 

      An organism that scavengers feed on in the marsh.

  • 15. 
     Why would water temperatures change considerably during a tide cycle in the salt marsh and tidal flats?
    • A. 

      Incoming tides flush in cooler ocean waters. Sound waters are shallower and can therefore heat/cool more quickly.

    • B. 

      Incoming tides flush in warmer ocean waters. Sound waters are shallower and can therefore heat/cool more quickly.

    • C. 

      Incoming tides flush in warm ocean waters. Sound waters are shallower and can therefore warm more quickly.

    • D. 

      Incoming tides flush in cooler ocean waters. Sound waters are shallower and can therefore cool more quickly.

  • 16. 
    Phytoplankton is plentiful in the salt marsh because of a the presence of a great amount of inorganic nutrients that sustain this environment. What is the relationship between the presence of inorganic nutrients and the abundance of phytoplankton.
    • A. 

      Phytoplankton is the basis of the salt marsh food web. It photosynthesizes in sunlight. At high tide phytoplankton are washed onto the muddy substrate of the marsh where it gets trapped and is food for the deposit, detrital and sediment in-take feeders.

    • B. 

      Phytoplankton are photosynthetic organisms. Phytoplankton can tolerate high salinity. The salt marsh has a high salinity. Phytoplankton blooms with sunlight and heat creating an abundance of food for the salt marsh.

    • C. 

      The salt marsh has a large supply of oxygen. There is plenty of oxygen in the water over the marsh and beneath the mud surface because decomposition of phytoplankton by bacteria produces oxygen.

    • D. 

      Phytoplankton are swept about by tides and currents. When the phytoplankton washes into the salt marsh it is the primary plant of the salt marsh that sticks to the silt and forms the substrate.

Back to Top Back to top