Final - Elbow To Wrist Fractures

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| By SkimOT2014
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SkimOT2014
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Final - Elbow To Wrist Fractures - Quiz

Starts on pg. 103 in your notes.


Questions and Answers
  • 1. 

    What is the normal "carrying angle" range in your upper arm and forearm?

    • A.

      1-5 degrees

    • B.

      5-10 degrees

    • C.

      5-15 degrees

    • D.

      15-20 degrees

    Correct Answer
    C. 5-15 degrees
    Explanation
    The normal "carrying angle" range in the upper arm and forearm is 5-15 degrees. This angle refers to the natural angle formed between the humerus bone in the upper arm and the ulna bone in the forearm. It allows for proper alignment and movement of the arm, facilitating activities such as carrying objects.

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  • 2. 

    The elbow joint provides supports during weightbearing/postural activities through the extended arm.

    • A.

      True

    • B.

      False

    Correct Answer
    A. True
    Explanation
    The elbow joint is indeed responsible for providing support during weightbearing or postural activities when the arm is extended. This is because the elbow joint consists of the humerus, ulna, and radius bones, along with various ligaments and muscles that work together to stabilize the joint and allow for movement. When the arm is extended, the elbow joint helps to distribute the weight and maintain balance, making the statement true.

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  • 3. 

    For a supracondylar fracture in the distal humerus, what angle is the elbow joint usually immobilized in?

    • A.

      45

    • B.

      90

    • C.

      120

    • D.

      180

    Correct Answer
    B. 90
    Explanation
    For a supracondylar fracture in the distal humerus, the elbow joint is usually immobilized at a 90-degree angle. This angle helps to stabilize the fracture and promote proper healing by reducing stress on the injured area. By immobilizing the elbow at 90 degrees, it allows for optimal alignment of the fracture fragments and minimizes the risk of further damage or displacement. This position also helps to prevent contractures and stiffness in the joint during the healing process.

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  • 4. 

    A complex fracture of the elbow joint is usually managed by:

    • A.

      ORIF

    • B.

      Closed Reduction

    • C.

      External Fixation

    Correct Answer
    A. ORIF
    Explanation
    ORIF stands for Open Reduction and Internal Fixation. It is a surgical procedure used to treat complex fractures of the elbow joint. In this procedure, the fracture is first reduced or realigned, and then internal fixation devices such as screws, plates, or rods are used to stabilize the bones and promote proper healing. ORIF is often preferred for complex fractures as it allows for more precise alignment of the bones and provides better stability compared to non-surgical methods like closed reduction or external fixation.

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  • 5. 

    Radial head fractures usually require immobilization for 2 to 6 weeks.

    • A.

      True

    • B.

      False

    Correct Answer
    B. False
    Explanation
    Usually not immobilized and the pt can be moved early in a protective sling.

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  • 6. 

    Which distal radius fracture is the most common?

    • A.

      Colle's Fracture

    • B.

      Smith's Fracture

    • C.

      Baron's Fracture

    Correct Answer
    A. Colle's Fracture
    Explanation
    Colle's fracture is the most common distal radius fracture. It occurs when the distal radius is broken and displaced towards the back of the hand. This type of fracture is typically caused by a fall onto an outstretched hand. The displacement of the fracture causes a characteristic "dinner fork" deformity, where the wrist appears bent and the hand is angled towards the back. Colle's fracture is more common in elderly individuals with osteoporosis, but can also occur in younger individuals due to trauma or sports injuries.

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  • 7. 

    A Colle's fracture involves: 

    • A.

      Dorsal displacement of the hand or distal segment

    • B.

      Volar displacement of the hand or distal segment

    • C.

      Fracture in the articulating surface of the radius + dislocation of carpals

    Correct Answer
    A. Dorsal displacement of the hand or distal segment
    Explanation
    A Colle's fracture involves dorsal displacement of the hand or distal segment. This means that the fracture occurs in the distal radius and the hand or wrist is displaced towards the back of the forearm. This type of fracture is commonly seen in older individuals who fall onto an outstretched hand, causing the radius to break and the hand to be pushed backwards. The characteristic deformity of a Colle's fracture is a "dinner fork" appearance of the wrist, with the hand bent backwards.

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  • 8. 

    A Smith's fracture involves: 

    • A.

      Dorsal displacement of the hand or distal segment

    • B.

      Volar displacement of the hand or distal segment

    • C.

      Fracture in the articulating surface of the radius + dislocation of carpals

    Correct Answer
    B. Volar displacement of the hand or distal segment
    Explanation
    A Smith's fracture involves volar displacement of the hand or distal segment. This means that the hand or distal segment is displaced towards the palm side of the hand. It is a type of fracture that occurs when there is a break in the radius bone of the forearm, specifically in the articulating surface, along with a displacement of the carpals.

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  • 9. 

    A Barton's fracture involves: 

    • A.

      Dorsal displacement of the hand or distal segment

    • B.

      Volar displacement of the hand or distal segment

    • C.

      Fracture in the articulating surface of the radius + dislocation of carpals

    Correct Answer
    C. Fracture in the articulating surface of the radius + dislocation of carpals
    Explanation
    A Barton's fracture involves a fracture in the articulating surface of the radius along with a dislocation of the carpals. This means that there is a break in the bone where it connects to the wrist joint, and the bones of the wrist are also displaced from their normal position.

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  • 10. 

    Which carpal fracture is the most common?

    • A.

      Scaphoid

    • B.

      Triquetreum

    • C.

      Lunate

    Correct Answer
    A. Scaphoid
    Explanation
    Scaphoid fractures make up about 60% of cases

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  • 11. 

    A triquetreum facture is usually caused by hyperextending the wrist while it is in ulnar deviation.

    • A.

      True

    • B.

      False

    Correct Answer
    A. True
    Explanation
    A triquetreum facture is a type of wrist fracture that is commonly caused by hyperextending the wrist while it is in ulnar deviation. This means that when the wrist is bent backwards and towards the pinky side of the hand, it can put excessive stress on the triquetrum bone in the wrist, leading to a fracture. Therefore, the statement that a triquetreum facture is usually caused by hyperextending the wrist while it is in ulnar deviation is true.

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  • 12. 

    Check all the OT management techniques (besides splinting) that are appropriate during the Immobilization stage of a wrist/elbow fracture:

    • A.

      AROM of uninvolved joints

    • B.

      Tendon Gliding

    • C.

      Edema Control

    • D.

      Wound Care

    • E.

      Peripheral nerve involvement assessment

    • F.

      Pain control

    • G.

      Scar management

    • H.

      PAMs

    • I.

      Joint mobilization

    • J.

      Functional activities to increase AROM/strength

    • K.

      Resistance

    • L.

      Self-PROM

    Correct Answer(s)
    A. AROM of uninvolved joints
    B. Tendon Gliding
    C. Edema Control
    D. Wound Care
    E. Peripheral nerve involvement assessment
    F. Pain control
    Explanation
    During the immobilization stage of a wrist/elbow fracture, it is important to implement various techniques to manage the condition. AROM (Active Range of Motion) of uninvolved joints is necessary to maintain mobility and prevent stiffness. Tendon gliding exercises help to maintain tendon function and prevent adhesions. Edema control techniques such as elevation and compression aid in reducing swelling. Wound care is essential to prevent infection and promote healing. Assessing peripheral nerve involvement ensures early detection of any nerve damage. Pain control techniques help to manage discomfort. These techniques collectively contribute to the successful management of a wrist/elbow fracture during the immobilization stage.

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  • 13. 

    Check all the OT management techniques (besides splinting) that are appropriate during the S/P Immobilization stage of a wrist/elbow fracture:

    • A.

      AROM of uninvolved joints

    • B.

      Tendon Gliding

    • C.

      Edema Control

    • D.

      Wound Care

    • E.

      Peripheral nerve involvement assessment

    • F.

      Pain control

    • G.

      Scar management

    • H.

      PAMs

    • I.

      Joint mobilization

    • J.

      Functional activities to increase AROM/strength

    • K.

      Resistance

    • L.

      Self-PROM

    Correct Answer(s)
    G. Scar management
    H. PAMs
    I. Joint mobilization
    J. Functional activities to increase AROM/strength
    K. Resistance
    L. Self-PROM
    Explanation
    During the S/P Immobilization stage of a wrist/elbow fracture, scar management is important to prevent excessive scar tissue formation and promote optimal healing. PAMs (Physical Agent Modalities) such as heat or cold therapy, electrical stimulation, and ultrasound can be used to reduce pain and inflammation, improve circulation, and promote tissue healing. Joint mobilization helps to restore normal joint range of motion and prevent stiffness. Functional activities to increase AROM (Active Range of Motion) and strength are necessary to regain functional abilities. Resistance exercises help in muscle strengthening. Self-PROM (Self-Passive Range of Motion) exercises can be performed by the patient themselves to improve joint mobility.

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  • Mar 16, 2023
    Quiz Edited by
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