Music And Society. The Mega Quiz

39 Questions | Total Attempts: 66

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Music And Society. The Mega Quiz

. Learn interesting facts and trivia about the long relationship music with our past and present societies, through this engaging and attractive mega quiz about Music and Society.


Questions and Answers
  • 1. 
    What is (are) the musical genre(s) practised by Kostas Papadakis?
    • A. 

      Rembetika

    • B. 

      Traditional Cretese music

    • C. 

      Any music written for the instrument bouzouki

    • D. 

      What Americans of Greek origin considered authentic Greek music

    • E. 

      Answers a, b, d, and f are right

    • F. 

      Though he played bouzouki in certain years, he was a violinist

  • 2. 
    What was the social status of Ludwig van Beethoven? 
    • A. 

      He was a landowner and an amateur musician

    • B. 

      He was an employee of certain aristocratic families in Vienna

    • C. 

      He was an independent musician, though he lived also thank to the patronage of Viennese patrician families

    • D. 

      He was an independent musician who lived only off the money that he generated through the concerts that he organised and the royalties of his publications

  • 3. 
    Which definition does best fit aristocratic opera (Italy, 17th century)? 
    • A. 

      It depends on the patronage of a given ruler

    • B. 

      It is by nature exceptional and unique (not to be reproduced or staged over and over)

    • C. 

      It celebrates an important official event

    • D. 

      It is reserved to a selected audience, each of whose member had been invited by the ruler

    • E. 

      None of these definitions is correct

    • F. 

      All of these definitions are correct, with the exception of e

  • 4. 
    Which definition does best fit commercial opera (Italy, 17th-18th century)?
    • A. 

      The main goal of those involved in its production was to make money

    • B. 

      It was by nature serial and to be staged over and over

    • C. 

      It did not celebrate anything

    • D. 

      Anybody who could afford to pay the ticket could attend the performances

    • E. 

      It was sung only by castrati

    • F. 

      All of the previous definitions are correct, with the sole exception of e

    • G. 

      None of these definitions is correct

  • 5. 
    What is a music scene?
    • A. 

      A specific site (city, neighbourhood, venue, etc.) were a specific kind of music is performed

    • B. 

      A cluster of music groups sharing the same characteristics in the same years, sometimes in exactly the same place(s)

    • C. 

      The context in which clusters of producers, musicians, and fans collectively share their common musical tastes and collectively distinguish themselves from others

    • D. 

      Is synonymous with stage

    • E. 

      None of the definitions is correct

  • 6. 
    What is the right definition/description of blues? 
    • A. 

      An Afro-American music

    • B. 

      It is based on texts of sadness, exploitation, misery set to a specific music

    • C. 

      It is based on a mixture of minor and major scales

    • D. 

      It is based on 12 bar musical phrases

    • E. 

      All the definitions are correct

  • 7. 
    What does characterise punk music? 
    • A. 

      It is fast and plaid high volume

    • B. 

      It is based on elementary chords and rhythms – though it has become more and more complex over the years

    • C. 

      It is a protest music

    • D. 

      It is experimental music

    • E. 

      It has no strong political connotations

    • F. 

      It is a music based on the idea of rejection: of conventions, of rock and roll conventions, of social rules, of the system as a whole

    • G. 

      Answers a, b, c, f are correct

    • H. 

      Answers a, b, d, and e are correct

  • 8. 
    What is (are) the main characteristic(s) of the Israeli genre called Musiqa Mizrachit?
    • A. 

      It is sung and plaid by musicians of Yemenite origin

    • B. 

      It is the music of the lower classes, often of Mediterranean and Middle Eastern origins

    • C. 

      The singers sing with a nasal quality of the voice

    • D. 

      It is based on standard Western popular music forms coupled with different Arabic, Greek, and Turkish musical elements

    • E. 

      The harmony is static, with wide spread use of Arabic cyclic rhythmic patterns

    • F. 

      An abundant use of vocal trilling

    • G. 

      All the answers are correct

    • H. 

      Though answers a and b are partially right, the correct answers are c, d, e, f

  • 9. 
    What does the word diva mean? 
    • A. 

      It comes from the latin divus (feminine, diva)– that is, divine

    • B. 

      It is a different name for prima donnas (first women) of a given vocal musical ensemble, mostly in opera

    • C. 

      It denotes capricious, unpredictable, voluble behaviour

    • D. 

      All the answers are correct

  • 10. 
    Who and what is a demiurge? 
    • A. 

      A creator

    • B. 

      Someone who creates out of nothing

    • C. 

      Someone who leads others to create together something, while those who do take part in the creation, are largely unaware of the ultimate goal of the demiurge

    • D. 

      Though a and b are correct, answer c is the most comprehensive and correct of all

  • 11. 
    “Serious Music”. What did this term mean at the time of Beethoven? 
    • A. 

      Any music other than opera

    • B. 

      Instrumental as well as vocal music performed in aristocratic venues and circles

    • C. 

      Music that is written in a complex way, so that only connoisseurs can truly relate to it

    • D. 

      Music that is not made just to entertain the audience, but rather to compel the listeners to tune in to its complex structure

    • E. 

      In Haydn’s words (Eroica documentary movie), music whose intent was “to strike a balance between the intellect and the soul”. Beethoven however took a path more oriented towards exploring, expressing, enquiring the soul

    • F. 

      None of the above answers is correct

    • G. 

      Answers c, d, e are correct

    • H. 

      All the answers are correct

  • 12. 
    Rebetiko (Greece), Arabeske (Turkey), Mizrahit (Israel). Why were these music genres rejected by the establishment in their respective countries? Is there any common factor behind these rejections? 
    • A. 

      Because they did not conform to social norms

    • B. 

      Rebetiko’s texts were dimmed unfit to be heard, its music too Oriental and coarse; Arabeske had music either too Oriental, or too pop, and the texts were too much focused on personal defeats and resignation; Mizrahit was considered vulgar, too Oriental, not refined, an not contributing to the building of a new, indigenous Israeli culture

    • C. 

      Answer b is correct but there is no mention of a common factor, that exists, and it is the fact that all three countries considered themselves for many years countries in the process of turning into real, new/old nations. Popular cultural therefore, music included, had to conform to specific aesthetic norms and cultural values

    • D. 

      None of the above answers is correct, each of these phenomena must be judged on its own

    • E. 

      All the answers are correct, with the exception of answer d

  • 13. 
    Why did Kostas Papadakis switch between different genres in his musical career? Why is his case considered “exemplar” in our course? 
    • A. 

      He had to move quite often because of external circumstances and personal choices. In each new place he had to adapt himself and his music to the current tastes of the place. His case is exemplar because he shows two important things: that popular music has individual protagonists and not only collective ones; and that also in this framework (ethnic musics), a musician is always conditioned by his social and cultural environment

    • B. 

      His case is just as different from Beethoven’s as one can possibly imagine. This is why he is one of our course’s subjects, and he has been examined alongside Beethoven’s genius. As to his musical changes, they were born out of curiosity

    • C. 

      He was a creative genius not less than Beethoven. As to his switching between different genres, it was due to his eclectic attitude and curiosity, which further proves his musical genius

    • D. 

      Whatever Papadakis did, changes and switches included, was the norm among rebetiko and Cretese musicians. That is why we considered his case exemplar

  • 14. 
    “Enchantment” is a term that recurs frequently whenever someone describes the performance of a gifted singer in 18th century Italian opera. In the same period sorceresses, magicians, and scenic appearances that looked the product of wizardry abounded in those operas. Why? Is there any common factor behind all this? 
    • A. 

      Enchantment produced by singing and wonder caused by the scenography were both indispensable ingredients to the success of any given opera

    • B. 

      Arias were enchanting because during their performance time stood still. Their performance was mostly given on the fore-stage, because they had little to do with the plot. They were a pure expression of an abstract feeling produced by the most moving of all instruments, the human voice. The scenography and its machinery also were the source of major wonder

    • C. 

      Though answers a and b are absolutely right, they do not address the common factor, i.e., the need of the society to see itself as an enchanted world, whereby everything is exceptional. From this point of view, opera wasn’t, but a very effective mirror of a desire turned into self-image

    • D. 

      Answers a and b are correct. There isn’t any common factor unifying the two features, that both contributed to make any opera performance special

    • E. 

      None of the above answers is correct

  • 15. 
    The quest for authenticity seems to play a major role in many issues that we have touched upon. Where have we met “authenticity” as a key factor in the general orientation of a given society, audience, music system towards music? And why? 
    • A. 

      Authenticity was a key factor in the decision made by the direction of the Greek public radio in the 1970s to ban Costas Papadakis because he plaid the violin, an instrument considered foreign to the authentic Cretan musical tradition, even though it features prominently in music performances on the island since more than 4 centuries

    • B. 

      Authenticity is a key factor in musical tourism in Chicago. People want to experience the real, authentic Chicago blues and jazz. Venues for this two different kinds of music are supposed to have specific characteristics

    • C. 

      Answers a and b are correct. Authenticity is often the key word for taking a specific phenomenon that took place in a given place at a given time, and make it an immutable point of reference. This notion of authenticity is exclusive and tends to ignore the complexity of real, ongoing phenomena. Authenticity is also sometimes synonymous with true. The truth it refers to is a construct

    • D. 

      All the above answers are not correct

    • E. 

      Authenticity was the key word in the fight waged by Haydn’s followers against Beethoven. They claimed that his music was lacking authentic feeling

    • F. 

      Authenticity is what characterises the life and art of Maria Callas and Britney Spears in the eyes of their followers

  • 16. 
    What are the main differences between British and American anarcho- punk independent labels? What do they stem from? 
    • A. 

      There are no differences at all. British and USA punk labels distribute bands that musically and politically are mutually interchangeable.

    • B. 

      Answer a is correct, under certain respects. The differences lie in the fact that independent British labels tend to bankrupt, Americans not. It stems from the fact the Brits live in a society marked by strong class differences, where social solidarity within one’s social class is more important than anything else. The Americans live in a culture that puts strong emphasis on personal responsibility, stressing the need to survive by yourself at any cost

    • C. 

      The main differences across the Atlantic Ocean lie in the musical and political differences between British and American bands. Whereas British band are much more political and outspoken, their music being much less refined and actually coarse than that of American bands, the USA groups focus more on the musical quality of their performances

    • D. 

      All the answers are partially right. None however is satisfactory enough

  • 17. 
    Canterbury School. Was it a musical school? Was it a sub genre? Was it a music scene? Is there any real common factor that might link all the musicians and groups that fell into this labelling? 
    • A. 

      It was a musical school, characterised by a soft and mellow sound and many experimentations. It was not a music scene

    • B. 

      It was a virtual music scene, invented/created by the press

    • C. 

      Though it was a virtual music scene, the bands labelled as Canterbury School were actually made by people who grew up in the Canterbury area in England

    • D. 

      The bands had little in common, but they were all experimental in nature, they all blended pop and rock elements with folk, jazz, electronic music. Most of their pieces were quite long and defied the LP format

    • E. 

      The media and the market are in constant need of labelling phenomena. Labelling means also marketing. Hence the sometimes artificial creation of countless sub-genres, such as the Canterbury School

    • F. 

      All the previous answers are correct

    • G. 

      All the previous answers are correct, with the exception of a and f

  • 18. 
    Simulacrum (plural, Simulacra). What is it? Why do we call divas Simulacra? What is the interaction between and audience and a simulacrum? Do the media play any role into it? 
    • A. 

      Simulacrum is an image of the sacred. As if it’s the sacred being. Divas are divine by definition, of this world and not of this world. They bring the audience into a different dimension. The audience adores a simulacrum. It is the medium to a transcendent dimension. The press allows the audience to share the simulacrum, to devour pieces of it by plunging into his/her private dimension

    • B. 

      Simulacrum is an interesting and brilliant metaphor of the diva-like being and experience. Yet, the two dimensions do not share anything. The press provides the audience gossip about divas

    • C. 

      The whole question is absolutely out of place

    • D. 

      Answers a and b are both somehow correct, but only in part

    • E. 

      The question is not out of place, and yet the answer are not correct at all. All of them

  • 19. 
    What are the reasons why Phillip Vannini in his article considers Britney Spears such an important phenomenon? 
    • A. 

      Because she is an image to a sound that has become a commodity

    • B. 

      Because of her sexual ambiguity – virgin and sexy, innocent and lascivious , so common and middle class and yet diva like

    • C. 

      Because she successfully placed herself at the intersection of fashion and music

    • D. 

      Because she it the perfect example of how the mass media and the entertainment industry converge in creating a series of illusions that are in turn functional to the making of a brand and therefore of a commodity

    • E. 

      Because she is the most typical example of a person made into an image, and the image becomes the commodity

    • F. 

      Because she is a star with no talent

    • G. 

      All the above answers are correct, with the exception of answer f

  • 20. 
    What kind of communication did von Karajan establish with the orchestra that he conducted? What does he want to communicate to the audience in his movies? Why is it relevant to our course? 
    • A. 

      Herbert von Karajan does not make any effort to establish an eye-to-eye communication with the players. He seems to be wanting to keep a distance

    • B. 

      He is very kind and respectful towards the orchestra members

    • C. 

      Though extremely courteous on a formal level, von Karajan treats the musicians like necessary appendixes who must carry on his orders

    • D. 

      Answers a and c are correct

    • E. 

      Though correct, answers a and c do not address the fact that von Karajan through the films about his rehearsals wants to communicate how much he is in control of even the most minute of all details, and how every performance isn’t but the perfect implementation of his will and vision

    • F. 

      Though correct, answers a and c do not explain the very simple fact that von Karajan wants just to show how he works

    • G. 

      Answer f is simplistic. Answer e is correct and almost complete. Von Karajan is the epitome of the conductor as the role model of a leader in an authoritarian society (Adorno)

    • H. 

      None of the answer is either correct or complete

  • 21. 
    Chicago blues, Chicago jazz, punk music, Canterbury school. Do all these phenomena have anything in common? 
    • A. 

      Not at all. They are such different music genres, that they hardly share anything

    • B. 

      Though extremely different one from another, all these phenomena have been investigated during the course as music scenes

    • C. 

      One can say that blues laid the foundations of both jazz and rock, and therefore, indirectly, of punk and Canterbury school music as well

    • D. 

      Chicago blues and Chicago jazz are linked by way of sharing a common origin place, the other two phenomena are both from UK

  • 22. 
    During the course, have we dealt with any music genre with strong and explicit political connotations? 
    • A. 

      Among the music genres that we have been dealing with, punk rock is the only one that was characterised by strong political intentions since its onset

    • B. 

      Rebetiko, Musiqa Mizrahit, Punk rock all have strong political connotations

    • C. 

      We examined the social implications of each genre, but none of them was explicitly political

    • D. 

      Though only indirectly, Italian opera is perhaps the genre with the strongest political connotations

  • 23. 
    What is the right definition of Rebetiko? 
    • A. 

      A Greek popular music genre

    • B. 

      Greek music genre where the bouzouki features in a prominent way

    • C. 

      Greek popular music that originated on the Asian shore of the Aegean sea (Smirna or Izmir)

    • D. 

      Greek popular music that thrived in sea cities with a port (Istanbul, Smirna, Piraeus)

    • E. 

      Music made mostly by Greek refugees from Asia Minor that were forced to migrate to Greek mainland in the 1920s

    • F. 

      It is made by songs with a very sad connotation that tell stories of tragic love and exploitation

    • G. 

      Though made by ethnic Greeks, Rebetiko has very strong Turkish features

    • H. 

      All of the above

    • I. 

      None of the above

  • 24. 
    Why did Beethoven write symphonies? 
    • A. 

      Because symphonies were considered the loftiest of all musical expressions

    • B. 

      Because the performance of symphonies always attracted large numbers of music lovers and connoisseurs

    • C. 

      Because symphonies were by nature destined to large audiences and therefore could make Beethoven’s new and original music ideas known to many

    • D. 

      All of the above

    • E. 

      None of the above

  • 25. 
    What are the main differences between aristocratic opera, and commercial opera? 
    • A. 

      There are actually no relevant differences between the two

    • B. 

      Commercial opera was open to anybody who could pay the ticket, aristocratic opera was by invitation only

    • C. 

      Aristocratic opera was made to mark some event connected to the life of the ruler, and was intended to be a one time, exceptional event; commercial opera did not mark anything and was serial

    • D. 

      Answers b and c are correct

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