Skull Anatomy MCQ Quiz Questions With Answers

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Skull Anatomy MCQ Quiz Questions With Answers - Quiz


Delve into the fascinating realm of skull anatomy with our MCQ quiz. Test your understanding of the intricate structure and functions of the skull, from its various bones to its role in protecting the brain and supporting facial features. Challenge yourself with a range of questions designed to deepen your knowledge and uncover intriguing insights into this essential component of the human body. Whether you're a student, healthcare professional, or simply curious about anatomy, this quiz offers an engaging opportunity to explore and learn about the complexities of the skull.


Skull Anatomy MCQ Questions and Answers

  • 1. 

    ___ bones make up the cranium, and ____ bones make up the face.

    • A.

      7 cranial , 12 facial

    • B.

      8 cranial , 12 facial

    • C.

      7 cranial , 14 facial

    • D.

      8 cranial , 14 facial

    Correct Answer
    D. 8 cranial , 14 facial
    Explanation
    The cranium, consisting of 8 bones, encloses and protects the brain, while the face, comprised of 14 bones, forms the structure of the facial features. Together, they contribute to the overall shape and function of the skull. These bones also provide attachment points for muscles involved in chewing, speaking, and facial expressions. Additionally, they house important sensory organs such as the eyes, nose, and ears, facilitating perception and communication.

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  • 2. 

    What is another name for the skull cap?

    • A.

      Calaveras

    • B.

      Calvarium

    • C.

      Craniocapitulum

    • D.

      Cranium

    Correct Answer
    B. Calvarium
    Explanation
    The correct answer is "calvarium." The skull cap, also known as the calvarium, refers to the dome-shaped superior portion of the skull that encases and protects the brain. It consists of the frontal, parietal, and occipital bones, which articulate at the cranial sutures. The calvarium forms the roof of the cranial cavity and provides vital protection to the brain against external trauma. Additionally, it serves as a site for muscle attachment and plays a role in maintaining the shape and structure of the skull.

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  • 3. 

    Which of the following are bones of the skull cap? 

    • A.

      Frontal

    • B.

      Sphenoid

    • C.

      Occipital

    • D.

      Ethmoid

    Correct Answer(s)
    A. Frontal
    C. Occipital
    Explanation
    The bones of the skull cap are the frontal and occipital bones. The frontal bone forms the forehead and the upper part of the eye sockets, while the occipital bone forms the back and base of the skull. The sphenoid and ethmoid bones are not part of the skull cap, as they are located deeper within the skull and contribute to the structure of the nasal cavity and eye sockets.

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  • 4. 

    What is the vertical portion of the frontal bone?

    • A.

      Frontal verticalas portion

    • B.

      Glabellar portion

    • C.

      Squamous portion

    • D.

      SOM portion

    Correct Answer
    C. Squamous portion
    Explanation
    The vertical portion of the frontal bone is called the squamous portion. It forms the anterior part of the forehead and extends upward to articulate with the parietal bones, forming a significant part of the skull's cranial vault. The squamous portion of the frontal bone contributes to the overall protection of the brain and provides attachment points for facial muscles and soft tissues.

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  • 5. 

    The frontal bone articulates with which of these bones? 

    • A.

      Occipital bone

    • B.

      Ethmoid bone

    • C.

      Zygomatic bone

    • D.

      Sphenoid bone

    Correct Answer(s)
    B. Ethmoid bone
    C. Zygomatic bone
    D. Sphenoid bone
    Explanation
    The frontal bone articulates with the ethmoid bone, zygomatic bone, and sphenoid bone. This means that it forms joints or connections with these bones. The frontal bone is located at the front of the skull and it connects with these other bones to form the structure of the skull.

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  • 6. 

    The Parietal bone articulates with how many cranial bones?

    • A.

      5

    • B.

      3

    • C.

      6

    • D.

      4

    Correct Answer
    A. 5
    Explanation
    The five cranial bones that the parietal bone articulates with are:Frontal bone: The parietal bones articulate with the frontal bone anteriorly, forming the coronal suture.Occipital bone: The parietal bones articulate with the occipital bone posteriorly, forming the lambdoidal suture.Temporal bones: The parietal bones articulate with the temporal bones laterally, forming the squamous sutures.Sphenoid bone: The parietal bones articulate with the sphenoid bone inferiorly, at the pterion, a point where the parietal, temporal, sphenoid, and frontal bones meet.Opposite parietal bone: The two parietal bones articulate with each other superiorly, forming the sagittal suture, which runs along the midline of the skull.

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  • 7. 

    The Occipital condyles help to form what joint?

    • A.

      Atlanto-axial joint

    • B.

      Atlanto-occipital joint

    • C.

      Axio-atlantal joint

    • D.

      Axio-occipital joint

    Correct Answer
    B. Atlanto-occipital joint
    Explanation
    The occipital condyles help form the atlanto-occipital joint. This joint is a synovial joint located between the base of the skull (occipital bone) and the first cervical vertebra (atlas). The occipital condyles are two rounded protuberances on the inferior surface of the occipital bone that articulate with the superior articular facets of the atlas. The atlanto-occipital joint allows for flexion and extension of the head, enabling movements such as nodding "yes" and looking up and down. The joint also permits slight lateral flexion and rotation of the head. The occipital condyles play a crucial role in providing stability and allowing smooth articulation between the skull and the cervical spine at the atlanto-occipital joint.

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  • 8. 

    The Occipital bone articulates with what other bones? 

    • A.

      Two parietals

    • B.

      Two temporals

    • C.

      Sphenoid

    • D.

      Atlas

    Correct Answer(s)
    A. Two parietals
    B. Two temporals
    C. Sphenoid
    D. Atlas
    Explanation
    The occipital bone articulates with two parietal bones, two temporal bones, the sphenoid bone, and the atlas bone. This means that it forms joints or connections with these bones, allowing for movement and stability in the skull.

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  • 9. 

    The mastoid tip is part of what bone?

    • A.

      Temporal bone

    • B.

      Occipital bone

    • C.

      Sphenoid bone

    • D.

      Mandible

    Correct Answer
    A. Temporal bone
    Explanation
    The mastoid tip is part of the temporal bone. The temporal bone is located on the side of the skull and houses important structures such as the middle and inner ear, as well as the mastoid process. The mastoid tip refers to the pointed projection at the lower part of the temporal bone, which can be felt behind the ear. It serves as an attachment site for muscles and provides protection to the delicate structures within the ear.

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  • 10. 

    What is another name for the Petrous Pyramid? 

    • A.

      Petrous tip

    • B.

      Petrous point

    • C.

      Petrous projection

    • D.

      Pars petrosa

    Correct Answer
    D. Pars petrosa
    Explanation
    The correct answer, "Pars petrosa," refers to the petrous portion of the temporal bone. The petrous pyramid is a part of the temporal bone located on its inferior surface. It contains important structures such as the inner ear and the carotid canal. "Pars petrosa" is a term commonly used in anatomy to describe this specific part of the temporal bone.

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  • 11. 

    The petrous ridge corresponds to the level of what important external landmark?

    • A.

      EAM

    • B.

      TEA

    • C.

      Gonion

    • D.

      Glabella

    Correct Answer
    B. TEA
    Explanation
    The upper border of the petrous portion is commonly referred to as the petrous ridge. The top of the ridge lies approximately at the level of an external radiography landmark called the top of ear attachment (TEA).

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  • 12. 

    What gland is housed within the sella turcica?

    • A.

      Adrenal gland

    • B.

      Pituitary gland

    • C.

      Sebaceous gland

    • D.

      Sphenoid gland

    Correct Answer
    B. Pituitary gland
    Explanation
    The correct answer is "Pituitary gland." The sella turcica is a saddle-shaped depression in the sphenoid bone of the skull. It houses the pituitary gland, also known as the master gland, which is responsible for regulating various hormonal functions in the body. Positioned within the sella turcica, the pituitary gland plays a crucial role in controlling growth, metabolism, reproduction, and other essential bodily processes by releasing hormones into the bloodstream.

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  • 13. 

    True or False, both lesser and greater wings of the sphenoid can be seen in the orbits?

    • A.

      True

    • B.

      False

    Correct Answer
    B. False
    Explanation
    False. The lesser and greater wings of the sphenoid bone cannot be seen in the orbits. The sphenoid bone is located in the middle of the skull and forms part of the base of the cranium. The lesser and greater wings of the sphenoid bone extend laterally from the body of the bone and do not extend into the orbits. They play a role in supporting the brain and providing attachment points for various muscles and ligaments.

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  • 14. 

    Which of the following is foramen of the sphenoid bone? 

    • A.

      Foramen ovale

    • B.

      Optic canal

    • C.

      Foramen ovaldum

    • D.

      Foramen rotundum

    Correct Answer(s)
    A. Foramen ovale
    B. Optic canal
    D. Foramen rotundum
    Explanation
    The sphenoid bone has multiple foramina, including the foramen ovale and the foramen rotundum. However, the foramen ovaldum is not a correct term. The correct foramina of the sphenoid bone include:Foramen ovale: Located in the middle cranial fossa, the foramen ovale allows the passage of the mandibular nerve (a branch of the trigeminal nerve) and the accessory meningeal artery.Foramen rotundum: Also located in the middle cranial fossa, the foramen rotundum allows the passage of the maxillary nerve (another branch of the trigeminal nerve).Optic canal: While not explicitly mentioned in the options, the optic canal is another important foramen in the sphenoid bone, through which the optic nerve (cranial nerve II) passes to transmit visual information from the eye to the brain.

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  • 15. 

    What projects superiorly from the cribriform plate of the ethmoid bone?

    • A.

      Perpendicular plate

    • B.

      Christa gali

    • C.

      Vomer

    • D.

      Apophyseal plate

    Correct Answer
    B. Christa gali
    Explanation
    The crista galli is the structure that projects superiorly from the cribriform plate of the ethmoid bone. The crista galli is a small, bony projection shaped like a rooster's comb, which gives it its name ("crista galli" means "rooster's comb" in Latin). This structure serves as an attachment point for the falx cerebri, a membrane that helps support and protect the brain within the skull. Additionally, the cribriform plate, located on either side of the crista galli, contains numerous small perforations that allow the passage of olfactory nerve fibers from the nasal cavity to the brain, facilitating the sense of smell.

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  • 16. 

    What is the name of the anterior end of the sagittal suture, where it meets the coronal suture?

    • A.

      Asterion

    • B.

      Lamda

    • C.

      Bregma

    • D.

      Pterion

    Correct Answer
    C. Bregma
    Explanation
    The correct answer is Bregma. Bregma is the name of the anterior end of the sagittal suture, where it meets the coronal suture. The sagittal suture is the line that separates the two parietal bones of the skull, and the coronal suture is the line that separates the frontal bone from the parietal bones. Bregma is an important anatomical landmark used in neuroanatomy and is commonly used as a reference point for brain measurements and surgeries.

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  • 17. 

    What is the name of the posterior point of the  squamosal suture, where it meets the lambdoidal suture?

    • A.

      Asterion

    • B.

      Bregma

    • C.

      Pterion

    • D.

      Lamda

    Correct Answer
    A. Asterion
    Explanation
    The point where the squamosal suture meets the lambdoidal suture is called the asterion. The asterion is an anatomical landmark on the skull, located at the junction of the parietal, occipital, and temporal bones. It is a useful reference point in neurosurgery and forensic anthropology for identifying the position of various cranial structures and understanding skull morphology. The other terms mentioned in the question are also important cranial landmarks:Bregma: The point where the coronal suture meets the sagittal suture, intersecting the parietal bones and the frontal bone.Pterion: The region where the frontal, parietal, sphenoid, and temporal bones meet, forming an important landmark for locating the anterior branch of the middle meningeal artery.Lambda: The point where the sagittal suture meets the lambdoidal suture, intersecting the parietal bones and the occipital bone.

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  • 18. 

    How many fontanels does an infant have?

    • A.

      7

    • B.

      5

    • C.

      6

    • D.

      3

    Correct Answer
    C. 6
    Explanation
    An infant typically has six fontanels, which are soft, membranous gaps between the cranial bones. These fontanels allow for the rapid growth and development of the infant's brain during the first few years of life, as well as facilitate the passage of the baby through the birth canal during delivery. The six fontanels include:Anterior (frontal) fontanel: Located at the junction of the frontal and parietal bones, it is the largest and most recognizable fontanel, often referred to as the "soft spot."Posterior (occipital) fontanel: Found at the junction of the occipital and parietal bones.Two sphenoid (anterolateral) fontanels: Located at the junction of the sphenoid, parietal, temporal, and frontal bones on each side of the skull.Two mastoid (posterolateral) fontanels: Situated at the junction of the parietal, occipital, and temporal bones on each side of the skull.As the infant grows and the bones of the skull develop, the fontanels close, usually by the age of 18-24 months, to form a more complete and protective cranial vault.

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  • 19. 

    True or False, the auricle and tragus are part of the middle ear?

    • A.

      True

    • B.

      False

    Correct Answer
    B. False
    Explanation
    The auricle and tragus are not part of the middle ear. The auricle refers to the visible part of the ear, also known as the pinna, which helps in collecting sound waves. The tragus is a small pointed projection of cartilage located in front of the ear canal. Both the auricle and tragus are external structures of the ear, while the middle ear consists of the eardrum and three small bones called ossicles.

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  • 20. 

    Which of the following is not a paired facial bone?

    • A.

      Lacrimal

    • B.

      Vomer

    • C.

      Maxilla

    • D.

      Zygoma

    Correct Answer
    B. Vomer
    Explanation
    The vomer is not a paired facial bone because it is a single bone located in the midline of the skull, forming the inferior part of the nasal septum. The lacrimal, maxilla, and zygoma are all paired facial bones that contribute to the structure and support of the face.

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  • 21. 

    The palatine processes are on which bone(s)?

    • A.

      Nasal bones

    • B.

      Palantine bone

    • C.

      Ethmoid bone

    • D.

      Maxilla bones

    Correct Answer
    D. Maxilla bones
    Explanation
    The palatine processes are located on the maxilla bones. The palatine processes are the horizontal plates of the maxilla bones that form the anterior part of the hard palate, which is the bony structure that separates the oral and nasal cavities. The maxilla bones are the main upper jaw bones and play a crucial role in facial structure and function.

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  • 22. 

    The zygomatic bones articulate with how many facial bones?

    • A.

      3

    • B.

      6

    • C.

      4

    • D.

      1

    Correct Answer
    C. 4
    Explanation
    The zygomatic bones articulate with four facial bones: the maxilla, temporal, sphenoid, and frontal bones. These articulations form crucial connections within the facial skeleton, contributing to facial structure and function. The zygomatic bones play a significant role in providing support and shape to the cheeks, as well as serving as attachment points for various facial muscles. Their articulations with adjacent bones enable smooth movement and coordination, essential for facial expressions and overall facial mobility.

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  • 23. 

    What is the name of the process on the anterior side of the mandibular notch?

    • A.

      Coronoid process

    • B.

      Corocoid process

    • C.

      Condyloid process

    • D.

      Alveolar process

    Correct Answer
    A. Coronoid process
    Explanation
    The correct answer is "Coronoid process." The coronoid process is a bony projection located on the anterior side of the mandibular notch. It serves as an attachment point for muscles involved in chewing and jaw movement. Specifically, the temporalis muscle attaches to the coronoid process, aiding in the elevation and retraction of the mandible during the closing of the mouth. This process plays a crucial role in the mechanics of mastication and overall jaw function.

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  • 24. 

    In total how many bones make up each orbit? 

    • A.

      5

    • B.

      2

    • C.

      7

    • D.

      4

    Correct Answer
    C. 7
    Explanation
    The orbits, or eye sockets, are made up of seven bones, three of which are cranial bones and four are facial bones. The cranial bones are:
    Frontal bone
    Ethmoid bone
    Sphenoid bone
    The facial bones are:
    Maxilla
    Zygomatic bone
    Lacrimal bone
    Palatine bone
    So, in total, seven bones make up each orbit. 

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  • 25. 

    Which bone sits laterally to the sphenoid bone in the orbit?

    • A.

      Maxilla

    • B.

      Ethmoid

    • C.

      Zygoma

    • D.

      Palantine

    Correct Answer
    C. Zygoma
    Explanation
    The zygoma bone sits laterally to the sphenoid bone in the orbit. The zygoma bone, also known as the cheekbone or malar bone, forms the prominence of the cheek and contributes to the lateral wall of the orbit. It articulates with the frontal bone, temporal bone, and maxilla, providing structural support to the face and helping to protect the eye.

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Nicolette Natale |BA |
Medical Expert
Nicolette is an accomplished physician, research coordinator, and medical writer, boasting over 6 years of expertise in healthcare, research, psychology, and education. Her qualifications include a D.O. from Nova Southeastern University and B.A. degrees in English Literature and Psychology from the University of Miami. Nicolette is deeply involved in medical research and patient care, demonstrating a commitment to advancing the field of medicine.

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