Practice GED 1 Barnes

25 Questions | Total Attempts: 80

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Practice GED 1 Barnes

GED is a set of tests that when passed certify the test taker, either American or Canadian, has met high-school level academic skills. Planning on taking the test? The quiz below is suited to help you revise and pass that test. Give it a try and share it with your friends!


Questions and Answers
  • 1. 
    Fort Sumter The Battle of Fort Sumter marked the first exchange of fire in the Civil War. After seven southern states ratified their declarations of succession, the state of South Carolina demanded that Federal (United States) troops stationed at Fort Moultrie (in Charleston Harbor) abandon the fort. On December 26, 1860, however, Union Major General Richard Anderson moved his troops from Fort Moultrie to Fort Sumter, because he thought Fort Sumter was more easily defended. South Carolina subsequently seized all other Federal forts in South Carolina except for Fort Sumter. About two weeks later, U.S. president at the time James Buchanan authorized the delivery of reinforcements to Fort Sumter. The ship carrying the reinforcements was fired upon by batteries from the South Carolina shore and the reinforcements never made it. Over the course of the next few months, Confederate forces strengthened batteries around Fort Sumter. Furthermore, the new president of the Confederacy, Jefferson Davis, appointed his first military officer, P.G. T. Beauregard, to command forces in Charleston. Ironically, Anderson and Beauregard were close friends and Beauregard even served as Anderson’s assistant after graduation from West Point. Inside the fort, Anderson and his troops were running short on food and supplies as a siege began to form. New president Abraham Lincoln again tried to resupply the fort and notified South Carolina Governor Francis Pickins that he was sending in ships. In response, Confederate forces demanded the immediate surrender of the fort. After General Anderson refused the demand, Confederate forces began bombarding Fort Sumter at 4:30 in the morning on April 12, 1860. Confederate forces firing on Fort Sumter quickly took their toll. Badly outgunned and outmanned, Anderson’s forces inside the fort initially returned fire, but were soon overwhelmed. After 34 hours, Major General Anderson agreed to evacuate the fort. No Union or Confederate soldiers were killed during the battle, though two Union soldiers would die as a result of a gun explosion during the surrender ceremonies on April 14. Both the North and the South became galvanized in their war efforts after Fort Sumter. President Lincoln’s request for the mobilization of 75,000 additional troops prompted the secession of four other states.  Question: Fort Sumter…
    • A. 

      Marked the last exchange of fire in the War

    • B. 

      Marked the first exchange of fire in the War

    • C. 

      Resulted in major loss of life for the Union

    • D. 

      Resulted in major loss of life for the Confederacy

  • 2. 
    The Battle of Fort Sumter marked the first exchange of fire in the Civil War. After seven southern states ratified their declarations of succession, the state of South Carolina demanded that Federal (United States) troops stationed at Fort Moultrie (in Charleston Harbor) abandon the fort. On December 26, 1860, however, Union Major General Richard Anderson moved his troops from Fort Moultrie to Fort Sumter, because he thought Fort Sumter was more easily defended. South Carolina subsequently seized all other Federal forts in South Carolina except for Fort Sumter. About two weeks later, U.S. president at the time James Buchanan authorized the delivery of reinforcements to Fort Sumter. The ship carrying the reinforcements was fired upon by batteries from the South Carolina shore and the reinforcements never made it. Over the course of the next few months, Confederate forces strengthened batteries around Fort Sumter. Furthermore, the new president of the Confederacy, Jefferson Davis, appointed his first military officer, P.G. T. Beauregard, to command forces in Charleston. Ironically, Anderson and Beauregard were close friends and Beauregard even served as Anderson’s assistant after graduation from West Point. Inside the fort, Anderson and his troops were running short on food and supplies as a siege began to form. New president Abraham Lincoln again tried to resupply the fort and notified South Carolina Governor Francis Pickins that he was sending in ships. In response, Confederate forces demanded the immediate surrender of the fort. After General Anderson refused the demand, Confederate forces began bombarding Fort Sumter at 4:30 in the morning on April 12, 1860. Confederate forces firing on Fort Sumter quickly took their toll. Badly outgunned and outmanned, Anderson’s forces inside the fort initially returned fire, but were soon overwhelmed. After 34 hours, Major General Anderson agreed to evacuate the fort. No Union or Confederate soldiers were killed during the battle, though two Union soldiers would die as a result of a gun explosion during the surrender ceremonies on April 14. Both the North and the South became galvanized in their war efforts after Fort Sumter. President Lincoln’s request for the mobilization of 75,000 additional troops prompted the secession of four other states. Question: Why did Major General Anderson move his troops to Fort Sumter? 
    • A. 

      Fort Sumter was in a better position to attack the Confederates

    • B. 

      Fort Sumter was in better condition that Fort Moultrie

    • C. 

      Fort Moultrie was harder to defend than Fort Sumter

    • D. 

      He was ordered to move by President Buchanan.

  • 3. 
    The Battle of Fort Sumter marked the first exchange of fire in the Civil War. After seven southern states ratified their declarations of succession, the state of South Carolina demanded that Federal (United States) troops stationed at Fort Moultrie (in Charleston Harbor) abandon the fort. On December 26, 1860, however, Union Major General Richard Anderson moved his troops from Fort Moultrie to Fort Sumter, because he thought Fort Sumter was more easily defended. South Carolina subsequently seized all other Federal forts in South Carolina except for Fort Sumter. About two weeks later, U.S. president at the time James Buchanan authorized the delivery of reinforcements to Fort Sumter. The ship carrying the reinforcements was fired upon by batteries from the South Carolina shore and the reinforcements never made it. Over the course of the next few months, Confederate forces strengthened batteries around Fort Sumter. Furthermore, the new president of the Confederacy, Jefferson Davis, appointed his first military officer, P.G. T. Beauregard, to command forces in Charleston. Ironically, Anderson and Beauregard were close friends and Beauregard even served as Anderson’s assistant after graduation from West Point. Inside the fort, Anderson and his troops were running short on food and supplies as a siege began to form. New president Abraham Lincoln again tried to resupply the fort and notified South Carolina Governor Francis Pickins that he was sending in ships. In response, Confederate forces demanded the immediate surrender of the fort. After General Anderson refused the demand, Confederate forces began bombarding Fort Sumter at 4:30 in the morning on April 12, 1860. Confederate forces firing on Fort Sumter quickly took their toll. Badly outgunned and outmanned, Anderson’s forces inside the fort initially returned fire, but were soon overwhelmed. After 34 hours, Major General Anderson agreed to evacuate the fort. No Union or Confederate soldiers were killed during the battle, though two Union soldiers would die as a result of a gun explosion during the surrender ceremonies on April 14. Both the North and the South became galvanized in their war efforts after Fort Sumter. President Lincoln’s request for the mobilization of 75,000 additional troops prompted the secession of four other states. Questions: Why could no reinforcements make it to Fort Sumter?
    • A. 

      Ships carrying reinforcements were fired upon by Confederate forces

    • B. 

      The waters around the fort were too dangerous

    • C. 

      The Union did not have the resources to send reinforcements

    • D. 

      Confederate forces sunk any ships attempting to supply Fort Sumter

  • 4. 
    The Battle of Fort Sumter marked the first exchange of fire in the Civil War. After seven southern states ratified their declarations of succession, the state of South Carolina demanded that Federal (United States) troops stationed at Fort Moultrie (in Charleston Harbor) abandon the fort. On December 26, 1860, however, Union Major General Richard Anderson moved his troops from Fort Moultrie to Fort Sumter, because he thought Fort Sumter was more easily defended. South Carolina subsequently seized all other Federal forts in South Carolina except for Fort Sumter. About two weeks later, U.S. president at the time James Buchanan authorized the delivery of reinforcements to Fort Sumter. The ship carrying the reinforcements was fired upon by batteries from the South Carolina shore and the reinforcements never made it. Over the course of the next few months, Confederate forces strengthened batteries around Fort Sumter. Furthermore, the new president of the Confederacy, Jefferson Davis, appointed his first military officer, P.G. T. Beauregard, to command forces in Charleston. Ironically, Anderson and Beauregard were close friends and Beauregard even served as Anderson’s assistant after graduation from West Point. Inside the fort, Anderson and his troops were running short on food and supplies as a siege began to form. New president Abraham Lincoln again tried to resupply the fort and notified South Carolina Governor Francis Pickins that he was sending in ships. In response, Confederate forces demanded the immediate surrender of the fort. After General Anderson refused the demand, Confederate forces began bombarding Fort Sumter at 4:30 in the morning on April 12, 1860. Confederate forces firing on Fort Sumter quickly took their toll. Badly outgunned and outmanned, Anderson’s forces inside the fort initially returned fire, but were soon overwhelmed. After 34 hours, Major General Anderson agreed to evacuate the fort. No Union or Confederate soldiers were killed during the battle, though two Union soldiers would die as a result of a gun explosion during the surrender ceremonies on April 14. Both the North and the South became galvanized in their war efforts after Fort Sumter. President Lincoln’s request for the mobilization of 75,000 additional troops prompted the secession of four other states. Question: Why is the following sentence ironic? “Ironically, Anderson and Beauregard were close friends and Beauregard even served as Anderson’s assistant after graduation from West Point.” 
    • A. 

      . Because Beauregard would become the Confederacy’s first military officer

    • B. 

      Because West Point was located in Union territory

    • C. 

      Because these two friends were battling each other in the war’s first battle

    • D. 

      Because no one died at Fort Sumter

  • 5. 
    Evaluate the equation below25 - 3 x 5 + (3+2) x 2
    • A. 

      30

    • B. 

      20

    • C. 

      230

    • D. 

      15

  • 6. 
    Solve the following equation:x + 5 = 12
    • A. 

      3

    • B. 

      5

    • C. 

      7

    • D. 

      9

  • 7. 
    What is the next number in the sequence?3,6,9, _____
  • 8. 
    Convert 2.5 years to days ( Round to nearest full day)
    • A. 

      5 days

    • B. 

      210 days

    • C. 

      551 days

    • D. 

      913 days

  • 9. 
    At a party there are 5 girls with blonde hair, 3 girls with black hair, 4 girls with red hair, and 3 girls with brown hair.  There were also 10 boys there.  What is the proportion of girls with blonde hair at the party compared to the other girls?
    • A. 

      1/3

    • B. 

      3/12

    • C. 

      1/5

    • D. 

      5/25

  • 10. 
    Solve : -4 x 12 = 
    • A. 

      48

    • B. 

      16

    • C. 

      -16

    • D. 

      -48

  • 11. 
    Convert the following decimal to a fraction:.875
    • A. 

      3/4

    • B. 

      5/7

    • C. 

      7/8

    • D. 

      1/2

  • 12. 
    Solve:  20% of 200
    • A. 

      20

    • B. 

      40

    • C. 

      45

    • D. 

      30

  • 13. 
    Normally, immune responses help protect an organism's body. However, some immune responses, such as allergies, do not seem to be protective. Allergies can occur in some people when they eat certain foods, receive certain drugs, or come into contact with dust or pollens.Allergies stem from several processes in the body. In some individuals, the body produces allergy antibodies that stick to white blood cells called mast cells. When a person comes into contact with a substance to which he or she is allergic, that substance reacts with the allergy antibodies. The mast cells release histamine as a result of this reaction. Histamine is responsible for the runny nose, itchy eyes, and difficult breathing associated with allergy.Question: Based on the information above, what must happen for an allergic reaction to occur?
    • A. 

      The allergy antibody must attach itself to the mast cell.

    • B. 

      Pollen in the air must trigger the production of disease-carrying antibodies.

    • C. 

      The allergy antibody must attack histamine.

    • D. 

      The allergy-causing substance must attack histamine.

    • E. 

      The body must be unable to produce antibodies to fight off diseases.

  • 14. 
    If water, cooking oil, and corn syrup are very carefully poured into a glass, one at a time, three distinct layers will form, as shown in the diagram.  What will happen if a drop of corn syrup is added to the glass containing the three liquid layers of water, oil, and corn syrup?
    • A. 

      The drop of corn syrup will float on the top layer.

    • B. 

      The drop will pass through the oil and water and mix with the corn-syrup layer.

    • C. 

      The drop will be trapped between the water and oil layers.

    • D. 

      The drop will mix with the oil layer.

  • 15. 
    A person visiting Mexico was frightened when a snake crossed his path and then turned toward him. The man grabbed a stick and clubbed the snake. When he was sure the reptile was dead, he sat down and examined it. He made the following observations. The rings around the body formed the following pattern: black, red, black, yellow; black, red, black, yellow. The scales were smooth, all about the same size, and cycloid in shape. No other markings were seen.Later, he found a book about snakes and used the following key to identify the snake he had killed.Question:Which of the following statements best summarizes the information on the key? 
    • A. 

      Smooth scales of similar size and shape are characteristic of blind snakes.

    • B. 

      The size of the scales on a snake’s head distinguishes colubrids from true boas.

    • C. 

      Colored rings and their arrangement separate elapids from blind snakes

    • D. 

      Snakes are best distinguished by their coloration, their scales, and the presence of a pit.

    • E. 

      Pit vipers have a deep pit between their nostrils and eyes, but colubrids and true boas do not.

  • 16. 
    HOW LONG WILL THIS MAN SURVIVE?       The man flung a look back along the way he had come. The Yukon lay a mile wide and hidden under three feet of ice. On top of this ice were as many feet of snow. It was all pure white, rolling in gentle undulations where the ice-jams of the freeze-up had formed. North and south, as far as his eye could see, it was unbroken white, save for a dark hairline that curved and twisted from around the spruce-covered island to the south, and that curved and twisted away into the north, where it disappeared behind another spruce-covered island. This dark hairline was the trail—the main trail—that led south five hundred miles to the Chilcoot Pass, Dyea, and salt water; and that led north seventy miles to Dawson, and still on to the north a thousand miles to Nulato, and finally to St. Michael on Bering Sea, a thousand miles and a half thousand more.       But all this—the mysterious, far reaching hairline trail, the absence of sun from the sky, the tremendous cold, and the strangeness and weirdness of it all—made no impression on the man. It was not because he was long used to it. He was a newcomer in the land, a cheechako, and this was his first winter. The trouble with him was that he was without imagination. He was quick and alert in the things of life, but only in things, not in the significances. Fifty degrees below zero meant eighty-odd degrees of frost. Such fact impressed him as being cold and uncomfortable, and that was all. It did not lead him to meditate on his frailty as a creature of temperature, and upon man’s frailty in general, able only to live within certain narrow limits of heat and cold; and from there on it did not lead him to the conjectural field of immortality and man’s place in the universe. Fifty degrees below zero stood for a bite of frost that hurt and that must be guarded against by the use of mittens, ear flaps, warm moccasins, and thick socks. Fifty degrees below zero was to him just precisely fifty degrees below zero. That there should be anything more to it than that was a thought that never entered his head.Jack London, "To Build a Fire," 1910Question: In the first paragraph, what does the dark line cutting through the snow represent?
    • A. 

      A River

    • B. 

      A row of spruce trees

    • C. 

      The Horizon

    • D. 

      A path

    • E. 

      The timberline

  • 17. 
    HOW LONG WILL THIS MAN SURVIVE?       The man flung a look back along the way he had come. The Yukon lay a mile wide and hidden under three feet of ice. On top of this ice were as many feet of snow. It was all pure white, rolling in gentle undulations where the ice-jams of the freeze-up had formed. North and south, as far as his eye could see, it was unbroken white, save for a dark hairline that curved and twisted from around the spruce-covered island to the south, and that curved and twisted away into the north, where it disappeared behind another spruce-covered island. This dark hairline was the trail—the main trail—that led south five hundred miles to the Chilcoot Pass, Dyea, and salt water; and that led north seventy miles to Dawson, and still on to the north a thousand miles to Nulato, and finally to St. Michael on Bering Sea, a thousand miles and a half thousand more.       But all this—the mysterious, far reaching hairline trail, the absence of sun from the sky, the tremendous cold, and the strangeness and weirdness of it all—made no impression on the man. It was not because he was long used to it. He was a newcomer in the land, a cheechako, and this was his first winter. The trouble with him was that he was without imagination. He was quick and alert in the things of life, but only in things, not in the significances. Fifty degrees below zero meant eighty-odd degrees of frost. Such fact impressed him as being cold and uncomfortable, and that was all. It did not lead him to meditate on his frailty as a creature of temperature, and upon man’s frailty in general, able only to live within certain narrow limits of heat and cold; and from there on it did not lead him to the conjectural field of immortality and man’s place in the universe. Fifty degrees below zero stood for a bite of frost that hurt and that must be guarded against by the use of mittens, ear flaps, warm moccasins, and thick socks. Fifty degrees below zero was to him just precisely fifty degrees below zero. That there should be anything more to it than that was a thought that never entered his head.Jack London, "To Build a Fire," 1910Question: How does the man expect to ward off the cold? 
    • A. 

      By keeping moving

    • B. 

      By following the trail

    • C. 

      By wearing proper clothing

    • D. 

      By accepting the discomfort

  • 18. 
    HOW LONG WILL THIS MAN SURVIVE?       The man flung a look back along the way he had come. The Yukon lay a mile wide and hidden under three feet of ice. On top of this ice were as many feet of snow. It was all pure white, rolling in gentle undulations where the ice-jams of the freeze-up had formed. North and south, as far as his eye could see, it was unbroken white, save for a dark hairline that curved and twisted from around the spruce-covered island to the south, and that curved and twisted away into the north, where it disappeared behind another spruce-covered island. This dark hairline was the trail—the main trail—that led south five hundred miles to the Chilcoot Pass, Dyea, and salt water; and that led north seventy miles to Dawson, and still on to the north a thousand miles to Nulato, and finally to St. Michael on Bering Sea, a thousand miles and a half thousand more.       But all this—the mysterious, far reaching hairline trail, the absence of sun from the sky, the tremendous cold, and the strangeness and weirdness of it all—made no impression on the man. It was not because he was long used to it. He was a newcomer in the land, a cheechako, and this was his first winter. The trouble with him was that he was without imagination. He was quick and alert in the things of life, but only in things, not in the significances. Fifty degrees below zero meant eighty-odd degrees of frost. Such fact impressed him as being cold and uncomfortable, and that was all. It did not lead him to meditate on his frailty as a creature of temperature, and upon man’s frailty in general, able only to live within certain narrow limits of heat and cold; and from there on it did not lead him to the conjectural field of immortality and man’s place in the universe. Fifty degrees below zero stood for a bite of frost that hurt and that must be guarded against by the use of mittens, ear flaps, warm moccasins, and thick socks. Fifty degrees below zero was to him just precisely fifty degrees below zero. That there should be anything more to it than that was a thought that never entered his head.Jack London, "To Build a Fire," 1910Question: In the second paragraph the narrator says, "He was quick and alert in the things of life, but only in things, not in the significances." What is the narrator suggesting about the man in these lines? The man 
    • A. 

      Can handle any situation

    • B. 

      Cannot see the danger he was in

    • C. 

      Believes material things are more important than values

    • D. 

      Is good at analyzing a situation

  • 19. 
    HOW LONG WILL THIS MAN SURVIVE?       The man flung a look back along the way he had come. The Yukon lay a mile wide and hidden under three feet of ice. On top of this ice were as many feet of snow. It was all pure white, rolling in gentle undulations where the ice-jams of the freeze-up had formed. North and south, as far as his eye could see, it was unbroken white, save for a dark hairline that curved and twisted from around the spruce-covered island to the south, and that curved and twisted away into the north, where it disappeared behind another spruce-covered island. This dark hairline was the trail—the main trail—that led south five hundred miles to the Chilcoot Pass, Dyea, and salt water; and that led north seventy miles to Dawson, and still on to the north a thousand miles to Nulato, and finally to St. Michael on Bering Sea, a thousand miles and a half thousand more.       But all this—the mysterious, far reaching hairline trail, the absence of sun from the sky, the tremendous cold, and the strangeness and weirdness of it all—made no impression on the man. It was not because he was long used to it. He was a newcomer in the land, a cheechako, and this was his first winter. The trouble with him was that he was without imagination. He was quick and alert in the things of life, but only in things, not in the significances. Fifty degrees below zero meant eighty-odd degrees of frost. Such fact impressed him as being cold and uncomfortable, and that was all. It did not lead him to meditate on his frailty as a creature of temperature, and upon man’s frailty in general, able only to live within certain narrow limits of heat and cold; and from there on it did not lead him to the conjectural field of immortality and man’s place in the universe. Fifty degrees below zero stood for a bite of frost that hurt and that must be guarded against by the use of mittens, ear flaps, warm moccasins, and thick socks. Fifty degrees below zero was to him just precisely fifty degrees below zero. That there should be anything more to it than that was a thought that never entered his head.Jack London, "To Build a Fire," 1910Question: Why do the cold and darkness make no impression on the man? He 
    • A. 

      Does not know what they mean

    • B. 

      Is accustomed to the cold

    • C. 

      Knows the sun will be shining soon

    • D. 

      Knows himself to be quick and alert

  • 20. 
    Using a Microwave (A)        (1) Today many people have microwave ovens, and must learn a very different method of cooking. (2) Let's look, then, at how microwave ovens work when they cook food. (3) Microwaves are extra-short radio waves, the movement of these waves inside the oven does the actual cooking. (4) The air inside the oven usually don't heat up very much. (5) The waves bounce around the oven and pass through the food repeatedly. (6) This action causes cooking to begin just below the food's surface. (7) As the heat spreads through the rest of the food, full cooking is achieved.  (B)        (8) While microwaving is quick, it does not always cook food evenly. (9) Although their cooking may be sometimes uneven, microwaves have become important tools in many kitchens. (10) Before new microwave owners master their ovens, we often find that some spots in a food will overcook, while others are still not completely cooked. (11) As a result, many microwave Recipes call for a 10- to 15-minute standing time after the power has been turned off.Question: Sentence 1: Today many people have microwave ovens, and must learn a very different method of cooking.Which is the best way to write the underlined portion of this sentence? If the original is the best way, choose option (1). 
    • A. 

      Have microwave ovens, and must learn

    • B. 

      Have microwave ovens and must learn

    • C. 

      Having microwave ovens, and must learn

    • D. 

      Have microwave ovens, and will learn

  • 21. 
    Using a Microwave (A)        (1) Today many people have microwave ovens, and must learn a very different method of cooking. (2) Let's look, then, at how microwave ovens work when they cook food. (3) Microwaves are extra-short radio waves, the movement of these waves inside the oven does the actual cooking. (4) The air inside the oven usually don't heat up very much. (5) The waves bounce around the oven and pass through the food repeatedly. (6) This action causes cooking to begin just below the food's surface. (7) As the heat spreads through the rest of the food, full cooking is achieved.  (B)        (8) While microwaving is quick, it does not always cook food evenly. (9) Although their cooking may be sometimes uneven, microwaves have become important tools in many kitchens. (10) Before new microwave owners master their ovens, we often find that some spots in a food will overcook, while others are still not completely cooked. (11) As a result, many microwave Recipes call for a 10- to 15-minute standing time after the power has been turned off.Question: Sentence 3: Microwaves are extra-short radio waves, the movement of these waves inside the oven does the actual cooking.Which is the best way to write the underlined portion of this sentence? If the original is the best way, choose option (1).  
    • A. 

      Waves, the

    • B. 

      Waves The

    • C. 

      Waves. The

    • D. 

      Waves, but the

  • 22. 
    Using a Microwave (A)        (1) Today many people have microwave ovens, and must learn a very different method of cooking. (2) Let's look, then, at how microwave ovens work when they cook food. (3) Microwaves are extra-short radio waves, the movement of these waves inside the oven does the actual cooking. (4) The air inside the oven usually don't heat up very much. (5) The waves bounce around the oven and pass through the food repeatedly. (6) This action causes cooking to begin just below the food's surface. (7) As the heat spreads through the rest of the food, full cooking is achieved.  (B)        (8) While microwaving is quick, it does not always cook food evenly. (9) Although their cooking may be sometimes uneven, microwaves have become important tools in many kitchens. (10) Before new microwave owners master their ovens, we often find that some spots in a food will overcook, while others are still not completely cooked. (11) As a result, many microwave Recipes call for a 10- to 15-minute standing time after the power has been turned off.Question: Sentence 4: The air inside the oven usually don’t heat up very much.Which correction should be made to sentence 4? 
    • A. 

      Insert a comma after air

    • B. 

      Change don't to didn't

    • C. 

      Change don't to doesn't

    • D. 

      Change don’t to do not

  • 23. 
    Using a Microwave (A)        (1) Today many people have microwave ovens, and must learn a very different method of cooking. (2) Let's look, then, at how microwave ovens work when they cook food. (3) Microwaves are extra-short radio waves, the movement of these waves inside the oven does the actual cooking. (4) The air inside the oven usually don't heat up very much. (5) The waves bounce around the oven and pass through the food repeatedly. (6) This action causes cooking to begin just below the food's surface. (7) As the heat spreads through the rest of the food, full cooking is achieved.  (B)        (8) While microwaving is quick, it does not always cook food evenly. (9) Although their cooking may be sometimes uneven, microwaves have become important tools in many kitchens. (10) Before new microwave owners master their ovens, we often find that some spots in a food will overcook, while others are still not completely cooked. (11) As a result, many microwave Recipes call for a 10- to 15-minute standing time after the power has been turned off.Question:  Sentence 10: Before new microwave owners master their ovens, we often find that some spots in a food will overcook, while others are still not completely cooked.Which correction should be made to sentence 10? 
    • A. 

      Replace their with they're

    • B. 

      Replace we with they

    • C. 

      Replace Before with So that

    • D. 

      Change are to is

  • 24. 
    Using a Microwave (A)        (1) Today many people have microwave ovens, and must learn a very different method of cooking. (2) Let's look, then, at how microwave ovens work when they cook food. (3) Microwaves are extra-short radio waves, the movement of these waves inside the oven does the actual cooking. (4) The air inside the oven usually don't heat up very much. (5) The waves bounce around the oven and pass through the food repeatedly. (6) This action causes cooking to begin just below the food's surface. (7) As the heat spreads through the rest of the food, full cooking is achieved.  (B)        (8) While microwaving is quick, it does not always cook food evenly. (9) Although their cooking may be sometimes uneven, microwaves have become important tools in many kitchens. (10) Before new microwave owners master their ovens, we often find that some spots in a food will overcook, while others are still not completely cooked. (11) As a result, many microwave Recipes call for a 10- to 15-minute standing time after the power has been turned off.Question: Sentence 11: As a result, many microwave Recipes call for a 10- to 15-minute standing time after the power has been turned off.Which correction should be made to sentence 11? 
    • A. 

      Change Recipes to recipes

    • B. 

      Remove the comma after result

    • C. 

      Change microwave to Microwave

    • D. 

      Change has been turned to will be turned