Light-dependent Reaction

9 Questions | Total Attempts: 4477

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Light-dependent Reaction

A basic quiz of the light-dependent reaction in photosynthesis.


Questions and Answers
  • 1. 
    • A. 

      Chlorophyll a molecules

    • B. 

      Cytochrome complex

    • C. 

      Accessory pigments

  • 2. 
    Which photosystem does the light-dependent reaction begin with?
    • A. 

      Photosystem I

    • B. 

      Photosystem II

  • 3. 
    Light absorbed by photosystem II serves to excite electrons in what molecules?
    • A. 

      Chlorophyll b molecules

    • B. 

      Chlorophyll a molecules

    • C. 

      Accessory pigment molecules

  • 4. 
    After the excited electrons are captured by the primary electron acceptor, water is split in a process known as what?
    • A. 

      Photolysis

    • B. 

      Photosynthesis

    • C. 

      Photophosphorylation

  • 5. 
    As the excited electrons lose energy along the electron transport chain, they are fueling the process of:
    • A. 

      Light absorption

    • B. 

      Chemiosmosis

    • C. 

      Photolysis

  • 6. 
    When photosystem I absorbs light and transfers an electron to a primary electron acceptor, an electron from _____________ fills the void.
    • A. 

      The cytochrome complex

    • B. 

      A chlorophyll a molecule

    • C. 

      Photosystem II

  • 7. 
    After the electron from photosystem I is transfered to the primary electron acceptor, it is passed along the electron transport chain by the carrier _____________.
    • A. 

      Oxycontin

    • B. 

      Cytochrome complex

    • C. 

      Ferredoxin

  • 8. 
    After NADP reductase transfers the electron from ferredoxin to NADP+, the NADP+ required how many electrons so that it can be reduced into NADPH?
    • A. 

      1

    • B. 

      2

    • C. 

      3

  • 9. 
    What are the products of the light-dependent reaction?
    • A. 

      Glucose

    • B. 

      Ferredoxin

    • C. 

      NADPH and ATP