Level One Ncea Language Features II

27 Questions | Total Attempts: 1517

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Level One Ncea Language Features II

Use the terms you have learnt using the flashcards to identify the examples.


Questions and Answers
  • 1. 
    KIWITAHI WAYAn orchard silvery and green as a sunlit breaking sea. The season stands aside to allow my grandfather his harvest. Over seventy he climbs a ladder and disappears into an apple tree. How they bounce into an empty bucket. Like somebody calling my name out in their sleep over and over         Robert                  RobertWhat is the name of the language feature is used in the first three lines? 
    • A. 

      Onomatopoeia

    • B. 

      Assonance

    • C. 

      Personification

    • D. 

      Simile

    • E. 

      Metaphor

  • 2. 
    KIWITAHI WAYAn orchard silvery and green as a sunlit breaking sea. The season stands aside to allow my grandfather his harvest. Over seventy he climbs a ladder and disappears into an apple tree. How they bounce into an empty bucket. Like somebody calling my name out in their sleep over and over         Robert                  RobertThe season stands aside to allow my grandfather his harvest. What is the name given to this language feature?
    • A. 

      Onomatopoeia

    • B. 

      Assonance

    • C. 

      Personification

    • D. 

      Simile

    • E. 

      Metaphor

  • 3. 
    KIWITAHI WAYAn orchard silvery and green as a sunlit breaking sea. The season stands aside to allow my grandfather his harvest. Over seventy he climbs a ladder and disappears into an apple tree. How they bounce into an empty bucket. Like somebody calling my name out in their sleep over and over         Robert                  RobertThe season stands aside Often a feature can be more than one thing. This is also a sound device. What is the name given to it?
    • A. 

      Assonance

    • B. 

      Onomatopoeia

    • C. 

      Alliteration

    • D. 

      Sibilance

  • 4. 
    Like ants in concrete crevices, we work unaware of higher creators.'Concrete crevices' is an example of what sound device?
    • A. 

      Onomatopoeia

    • B. 

      Alliteration

    • C. 

      Assonance

    • D. 

      Sibilance

  • 5. 
    Like ants in concrete crevices, we work unaware of higher creatorsWhat is the name given to this kind of comparison?
    • A. 

      Metaphor

    • B. 

      Extended metaphor

    • C. 

      Simile

  • 6. 
    The parched pavement peeled in the hot summer sun.Which term best describes this example?
    • A. 

      Alliteration

    • B. 

      Assonance

    • C. 

      Sibilance

    • D. 

      Onomatopoeia

  • 7. 
    I dunno where we're meeting up tomorrow.Which term best describes this example?
    • A. 

      Slang

    • B. 

      Jargon

    • C. 

      Colloquial language

    • D. 

      Sibilance

  • 8. 
    There was a big thud when the brick hit the floor.Which term best describes this example?
    • A. 

      Colloquial language

    • B. 

      Alliteration

    • C. 

      Assonance

    • D. 

      Onomatopoeia

  • 9. 
    All you could hear was the buzzing of the fly and then squish! Dad squashed the fly.Which term best describes this example?
    • A. 

      Colloquial language

    • B. 

      Alliteration

    • C. 

      Assonance

    • D. 

      Onomatopoeia

  • 10. 
    The dam ran dry during the drought.Which term best describes this example?
    • A. 

      Alliteration

    • B. 

      Assonance

    • C. 

      Sibilance

    • D. 

      Onomatpoeia

  • 11. 
    Nothing Gold Can StayNature's first green is gold, Her hardest hue to hold. Her early leafs a flower; But only so an hour. Then leaf subsides to leaf. So Eden sank to grief, So dawn goes down to day. Nothing gold can stay.Which of the following does not feature in this poem?
    • A. 

      Alliteration

    • B. 

      Personification

    • C. 

      Rhyme

    • D. 

      Simile

  • 12. 
    Nothing Gold Can StayNature's first green is gold, Her hardest hue to hold. Her early leafs a flower; But only so an hour. Then leaf subsides to leaf. So Eden sank to grief, So dawn goes down to day. Nothing gold can stay.Which of the following is not an example of alliteration?
    • A. 

      Nothing gold can stay

    • B. 

      So dawn goes down to day

    • C. 

      Her hardest hue to hold

  • 13. 
    The BellsHear the sledges with the bells-Silver bells!What a world of merriment their melody foretells!How they tinkle, tinkle, tinkle,In the icy air of night!While the stars that oversprinkleAll the heavens, seem to twinkleWith a crystalline delight;Keeping time, time, time,In a sort of Runic rhyme,To the tintinnabulation that so musically wellsFrom the bells, bells, bells, bells,Bells, bells, bells-From the jingling and the tinkling of the bellsWhich of the following is not a feature of this poem?
    • A. 

      Simile

    • B. 

      Rhyme

    • C. 

      Onomatopoeia

    • D. 

      Repetition

  • 14. 
    The BellsHear the sledges with the bells-Silver bells!What a world of merriment their melody foretells!How they tinkle, tinkle, tinkle,In the icy air of night!While the stars that oversprinkleAll the heavens, seem to twinkleWith a crystalline delight;Keeping time, time, time,In a sort of Runic rhyme,To the tintinnabulation that so musically wellsFrom the bells, bells, bells, bells,Bells, bells, bells-From the jingling and the tinkling of the bellsWhich of the following is not an example of onomatopoeia?
    • A. 

      How they tinkle, tinkle, tinkle

    • B. 

      From the jingling and the tinkling of the bell

    • C. 

      Hear the sledges with the bells

  • 15. 
    A Rose For JanetI know this rose is onlyan ink-and-paper rosebut see how it grows and goeson growingbeneath your eyes:Which term best describes the feature used in the opening lines of this poem?
    • A. 

      Assonance

    • B. 

      Sibilance

    • C. 

      Alliteration

  • 16. 
    'Although I'm not very good, I really enjoy playing football.'What type of sentence is this?
    • A. 

      Compound

    • B. 

      Complex

    • C. 

      Simple

    • D. 

      Imperative

  • 17. 
    Please find my yellow leotardWhat kind of sentence is this?
    • A. 

      Compound

    • B. 

      Complex

    • C. 

      Simple

    • D. 

      Imperative

  • 18. 
    What language feature is this an example of?
    • A. 

      Pun

    • B. 

      Jargon

    • C. 

      Connotative vocabulary

    • D. 

      Cliche

  • 19. 
    The following is excerpt from an article on academic language written by the journalist Robert Fisk. About three years ago, I received a good example of this from Marc Gopin, visiting associate professor of international diplomacy at the Fletcher School of Tufts University and a visiting scholar in the programme on negotiation at Harvard. I received his latest book for review, a tome called Holy War, Holy Peace: How Religion Can Bring Peace to the Middle East. A promising title, you might think. Well, think again.For within pages, I was being bushwhacked by "metaphorical constructs" and "universalist mythic constructs" and "romanticised, amoral constructs of culture" and "fundamental dialogic immediacy" and "prosocial tendencies".Here is another cracker: "The Abrahamic myth of a loving Patriarch and a loving God who care for a special people has created a home and a meaning system for millions of human beings." Come again? Meaning system? The author grew up, he says, "in a self-consciously exilic spirituality".Which term best describes the language described by Fisk?
    • A. 

      Pun

    • B. 

      Jargon

    • C. 

      Connotative vocabulary

    • D. 

      Cliche

  • 20. 
    Another excerpt from an article by Robert Fisk dealing with the use and misuse of language.But it is intended to impress, isn't it? To make us believe that Master Cheetham is clever, nuanced, even – heaven spare us – literate. It is meant to make us believe that he is a Deep Thinker, that Corvus is appealing to the super-educated, those who "push the envelope", who talk the non-language of BBC management and New Labour; it was, after all, not surprising that the BBC's top crap-talk specialist ended up working for Tony Blair.Why is 'push the envelope' in quotation marks?
    • A. 

      To draw the readers attention to it

    • B. 

      To emphasise the idea

    • C. 

      To show that it is not the writers own phrase

  • 21. 
    But it is intended to impress, isn't it? To make us believe that Master Cheetham is clever, nuanced, even – heaven spare us – literate. It is meant to make us believe that he is a Deep Thinker, that Corvus is appealing to the super-educated, those who "push the envelope", who talk the non-language of BBC management and New Labour; it was, after all, not surprising that the BBC's top crap-talk specialist ended up working for Tony Blair.Which term best describes 'push the envelope' in the way that it being used in this article?
    • A. 

      Pun

    • B. 

      Jargon

    • C. 

      Connotative vocabulary

    • D. 

      Cliche

  • 22. 
    War On TerrorWhat is the word 'terror' and example of?
    • A. 

      Jargon

    • B. 

      Cliche

    • C. 

      Emotive vocabulary

  • 23. 
    Another Fisk excerptJust look at the individual words we have recently co-opted from the US military. When we Westerners find that "our" enemies – al-Qa'ida, for example, or the Taliban – have set off more bombs and staged more attacks than usual, we call it "a spike in violence".Ah yes, a "spike"! A "spike" is a word first used in this context, according to my files, by a brigadier general in the Baghdad Green Zone in 2004. Yet now we use that phrase, we extemporise on it, we relay it on the air as our phrase, our journalistic invention. We are using, quite literally, an expression created for us by the Pentagon. A spike, of course, goes sharply up then sharply downwards. A "spike in violence" therefore avoids the ominous use of the words "increase in violence" – for an increase, of course, might not go down again afterwards.What aspect of language is Fisk focussing on in this article?
    • A. 

      The connotations of words

    • B. 

      The denotations of words

    • C. 

      Use of jargon

    • D. 

      Use of cliches

  • 24. 
    Which of the following is not a connotation associated with the word 'home'?
    • A. 

      A place where someone lives

    • B. 

      A place where someone feels they belong

    • C. 

      A place where someone feels safe

  • 25. 
    Which of the following is not a connotation of the word 'mother'?
    • A. 

      Caring

    • B. 

      Nuturing

    • C. 

      A person who has a child

    • D. 

      Loving