Latin Nouns: First Declension

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Quizzes Created: 1 | Total Attempts: 101
Questions: 12 | Attempts: 101

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Latin Quizzes & Trivia

A quick quiz for declining a feminine Latin noun. Please respond in all lower-case with no accent marks.


Questions and Answers
  • 1. 

    What is Latin for "queen" in the nominative case?

    Explanation
    The Latin word for "queen" in the nominative case is "regina".

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  • 2. 

    What is Latin for "queen" in the vocative case?

    Explanation
    The Latin word "regina" means "queen" in English. In the vocative case, which is used to address someone directly, the word "regina" would still be used to refer to a queen. Therefore, "regina" is the correct answer for the Latin word for "queen" in the vocative case.

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  • 3. 

    What is Latin for "queens" in the nominative case?

    Explanation
    The Latin word for "queens" in the nominative case is "reginae." In Latin, nouns have different forms depending on their grammatical function in a sentence. The nominative case is used for the subject of a sentence, and "reginae" is the correct form for the noun "queens" in this case.

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  • 4. 

    What is Latin for "queens" in the vocative case?

    Explanation
    In Latin, the vocative case is used when directly addressing someone or something. The word "reginae" is the correct answer because it is the vocative form of the word "regina," which means "queen" in English. Therefore, "reginae" is the Latin word for "queens" in the vocative case.

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  • 5. 

    What is Latin for "queen" in the accusative case?

    Explanation
    The Latin word for "queen" in the accusative case is "reginam." In Latin, the accusative case is used to indicate the direct object of a verb or the object of certain prepositions. In this case, "reginam" is the form of the word that would be used when referring to the queen as the direct object of a verb or the object of a preposition.

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  • 6. 

    What is Latin for "queens" in the accusative case?

    Explanation
    The Latin word "reginas" is the accusative case form of the word "queen." In Latin, the accusative case is used to indicate the direct object of a verb or the object of certain prepositions. Therefore, "reginas" would be the correct form to use when referring to queens as the direct object of a verb or as the object of a preposition in a sentence.

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  • 7. 

    What is Latin for "to the queen"?

    Explanation
    The Latin word "reginae" translates to "to the queen" in English. In Latin, nouns have different forms depending on their grammatical function in a sentence. In this case, "reginae" is the dative form of the noun "regina," which means "queen." The dative case is used to indicate the indirect object of a verb or the recipient of an action. Therefore, "reginae" accurately represents the phrase "to the queen" in Latin.

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  • 8. 

    What is Latin for "to the queens"?

    Explanation
    The Latin word "reginis" translates to "to the queens" in English. This word is formed from the noun "regina" which means "queen" and the preposition "in" which means "to" or "towards". Therefore, "reginis" is the correct Latin term for expressing the direction or movement towards multiple queens.

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  • 9. 

    What is Latin for "of the queen"?

    Explanation
    The Latin word "reginae" translates to "of the queen." This is derived from the Latin word "regina," which means "queen." By adding the suffix "-ae," which indicates possession or belonging, the word becomes "reginae," specifically meaning "of the queen."

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  • 10. 

    What is Latin for "of the queens"?

    Explanation
    The Latin word "reginarum" translates to "of the queens" in English. The word "regina" means "queen" in Latin, and the suffix "-arum" indicates the genitive plural form, which signifies possession or relationship. Therefore, "reginarum" is the correct translation for "of the queens" in Latin.

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  • 11. 

    What is Latin for "queen" in the ablative case?

    Explanation
    The Latin word "regina" means "queen" in English. In the ablative case, it remains the same as "regina". The ablative case is used to indicate various grammatical functions such as means, manner, or time. In this case, "regina" would be used to refer to a queen in a sentence where the queen is the object of a preposition or is indicating a location.

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  • 12. 

    What is Latin for "queens" in the ablative case?

    Explanation
    In Latin, the word "reginis" is the ablative case form of the word "queens." The ablative case is used to indicate various relationships, such as the means by which something is done or the manner in which something happens. In this case, "reginis" would be used to refer to queens in the context of an ablative construction.

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