The Equitable Pedagogy Quiz

10 Questions | Total Attempts: 346

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The Equitable Pedagogy Quiz

These scenarios are some examples of situations you may face in your teaching career. Please choose the answer that best aligns with an Equity Pedagogy, by creating a safe environment that ensures all students, regardless of background, have the chance to succeed. Explanations for each question are available, just click "View Answer. " Choose the best answer for each question.


Questions and Answers
  • 1. 
    Two students in your class are children of Mexican Immigrants.  They speak Spanish at home and are unusually reserved and quiet in class.  How should you approach their education? 
    • A. 

      They obviously don't speak English well enough to learn and should be assigned to a Special Education classroom.

    • B. 

      Take some time to speak to them individually and assess their fluency. If they need extra help, make sure they receive it, but include them in class as much as possible.

    • C. 

      After you've given direction in class, deliver a second set of instructions to these students in a slow and deliberate manner. This way you ensure they understand and other students with questions can hear the instructions again.

  • 2. 
    The students in your class are predominantly Christian.  One student, however, comes from a family of Jehova's Witnesses.  Most students are looking forward to a Christmas Party on the last day of school before Winter Break.  How do you ensure that all religious views are considered?  
    • A. 

      Have the Christmas party. Democratically, you should attempt to please the largest segment of the population.

    • B. 

      Cancel the party and have class as normal on the last day before break. You can't risk offending the family of the single Jehova's Witness.

    • C. 

      Talk to the student and his parents before planning anything. Ask them what the best solution is. You may be able to make other arrangements for him during the party or change the nature of the party to make it unoffensive.

  • 3. 
    One of the students in your class has an IEP that identifies him as having a visual handicap.  He can't read small text well, but is an exemplary student.  How do you approach reading assignments in the classroom?
    • A. 

      Announce to the whole class that all reading will have to be done aloud in class because one student is incapable of doing the reading independently.

    • B. 

      Find out if you can send the visually impaired student out of the classroom when discussing readings, as he is simply incapable of doing them and should not be allowed to slow the whole class down.

    • C. 

      Speak to the student and see if he would be okay working with another student to complete his reading. Then assign reading partners for the entire class. Make sure that the student you assign to work with the visually impaired boy is someone who doesn't mind providing the extra help, and give the pair any assistance they might require.

  • 4. 
    A student in one of your classes has spoken to you privately about being offended by other students using the phrase "That's so gay" in your class.  How do you address the situation?
    • A. 

      Discuss respectful language in your classroom. Provide students with a list of alternate phrases to use instead of "that's so gay." Discuss all types of hurtful and disrespectful language. Ask students to think about how it feels to be discriminated against.

    • B. 

      Tell the student to stop being so sensitive. The phrase is obviously not intended to be personally offensive to them.

    • C. 

      Announce to the class that a homosexual classmate is uncomfortable with some of their language, then ask the student who complained to explain their feelings to the class.

  • 5. 
    In your first year as a full-time teacher, you are eager to use some of the technology you learned about in your Ed Tech class.  Your first assignment is a personal blog that students are to complete on their own time.  After class, a student comes up to you and explains that his family is unable to afford a computer and he will not be able to complete the assignment at home.  What do you do?   
    • A. 

      Tell the student that technology use is required to pass the class, and they will have to find a way to meet the requirement. The student is most likely lying in an effort to get out of the assignment.

    • B. 

      Give the student an alternate assignment: a presentation to the class on the difficulty of living without technology in today's world.

    • C. 

      Work with the student to find ways for them access the technology. Find out if they can get into the school's computer lab or use your classroom computer before or after school.

  • 6. 
    One day, while putting students into randomly-assigned groups, an argument erupts.  One student is refusing to work with another because they are in a wheelchair.  The first student says "My dad says crippled people are touched by the devil, and I shouldn't hang out with them."  How do you deal with this? 
    • A. 

      Separate the students and make sure they don't have to work together in the future.

    • B. 

      Explain to the first student that while he is entitled to his religious beliefs, discrimination is not tolerated in your classroom. If the second student seems upset, assign him to a different group for the day, making sure he knows that he is a valued member of the class and will not be subject to further discrimination. Later, call the parents of both students to let them know what took place.

    • C. 

      Force the first student to do his classwork with only his non-dominant hand for the rest of the day, so he can get an idea what it feels like to be handicapped.

  • 7. 
    While walking down the hallway before school, you encounter two students who are accosting an Indian classmate.  They are pushing him back and forth, chanting "Terrorist! Terrorist!"  What do you do?
    • A. 

      Explain to all of the students that the terrorists responsible for 9/11 were mostly Saudi Arabian and that this student's family is from India, so he should be left alone.

    • B. 

      Ask the Indian student to explain his religious beliefs and family heritage to the other students, so that they can come to see that he is a person with feelings and personal beliefs.

    • C. 

      Stop the behavior immediately and ensure the victim is not hurt. Make sure the perpetrators know that such intolerant behavior will not be tolerated. Escort the two boys to the office for appropriate disciplinary action.

  • 8. 
    In the teacher's lounge, you overhear one of your colleagues describing a female student who has recently come to school with short hair and some new piercings as a "dyke."  You happen to know that another teacher at your school, who happens to be in the room, is a lesbian.  She says nothing, but is visibly upset.  What do you do?
    • A. 

      It's none of your business what a teacher says. Their personal opinion has no bearing on the education that students receive at your school.

    • B. 

      Point out that one of your colleagues is a lesbian, and that using such language in front of her is offensive and uncalled for. Then, rush to the office and file a complaint with the administration against the teacher.

    • C. 

      Calmly speak up, suggesting that a teacher should perhaps be more mindful of the language they use. Don't get into a debate, just vocalize that such language may be offensive.

  • 9. 
    You are supervising a group of three students who are doing the driving portion of driver's ed.  Two are white and the third is black.  When the black student gets behind the wheel, one of the white students in the backseat says to the other: "I hope we don't have to stop and do any drive-bys."  How do you handle the situation? 
    • A. 

      Turn to the students in the back seat and explain that racist language will not be tolerated. Ensure that they know that such comments are hurtful and unnecessary, then take whatever disciplinary action you feel is necessary.

    • B. 

      Laugh it off, hoping that the uncomfortable moment will pass and you can get back to your teaching.

    • C. 

      Order the two white students out of the car, forcing them to walk back to the school.

  • 10. 
    After covering addition of fractions in class, you notice that four students in particular seem to be having trouble with the concept, while the rest of the students grasped it immediately.  The next unit requires students to have mastered this skill and build upon it to move forward.  How do you ensure the success of all of your students in an equitable manner? 
    • A. 

      Move forward. There is no reason to negatively affect the progress of the whole class for such a small group.

    • B. 

      Create an assignment that will keep the entire class engaged, while allowing you to dedicate some extra time to the students who are struggling, to ensure that they are caught up before moving on. Allow the students who have mastered the concept to teach it to the class, for example.

    • C. 

      Cover the entire section again, in exactly the same way, and hope that the students somehow catch on this time through.