What Kind Of Professional ‘reflexive’ Type Are You?

10 Questions | Total Attempts: 32

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Profession Quizzes & Trivia

Have you ever considered the process of how you make choices in your life? For philosophers and social theorists the process of making informed and reflective choices for action is called? Reflexivity? . In this quiz you will discover which of the four types of? Reflexive approaches? (Archer, 2007, 2010) you predominately favour.


Questions and Answers
  • 1. 
    You see an opportunity for a new pool of government funding. What is the first thing you do?
    • A. 

      Tell your colleagues and peers about the money.

    • B. 

      Save to your desktop to look at later, if you get time.

    • C. 

      Read to see if you are eligible to apply, download the forms to take to the next staff meeting.

    • D. 

      Download the forms and begin filling them in.

  • 2. 
    One of your participants has said they feel they are not being heard in the workshop space. How do you handle the situation?
    • A. 

      Take note but you do not want to upset the group dynamics so you watch the situation, knowing you will try and do something about it if it becomes a problem.

    • B. 

      Discuss the issue with colleagues, peers and the group.

    • C. 

      Tell the group this person doesn’t feel heard and consciously ask this person to contribute next session.

    • D. 

      Observe how the group interacts with this participant and create opportunities for everyone to share their views in the workshop space.

  • 3. 
    You have a workshop booked in for Saturday but three people have pulled out leaving you under your minimum participant numbers. What do you do?
    • A. 

      Cancel- it is not financially worth your while.

    • B. 

      Look at your cost recovery for the last few weeks; you had extra numbers in the last three workshops so you can afford to run this session at a loss to keep participant momentum.

    • C. 

      Worry about what to do until Thursday when you let everyone know numbers are down and that you don’t know whether to cancel or not.

    • D. 

      Ring and talk to those who are coming because you will still run the session if everyone is keen.

  • 4. 
    It is lunchtime and you sense that the morning session has not gone very well. Activities seem to be taking too long and participants general appear disengaged. What do you do next?
    • A. 

      Mingle during lunchtime and check how participants feel and what they would like to experience in the next session.

    • B. 

      Trust your instincts and spend the break redesigning the rest of the day using different strategies.

    • C. 

      Join the group for lunch, while thinking about changing the next session if you get time, but end up following your original plan because you feel overwhelmed.

    • D. 

      Have a quick review of your afternoon planning and re-arrange some activities to liven up the session. Then join the group and share your thoughts about how the afternoon could proceed and check how they feel.

  • 5. 
    Your participants are producing a work for public display. You are gently facilitating their process however the final product is proving to be messy and unpolished. How do you manage this situation?
    • A. 

      Mull over various ways you could approach this challenge without offending anyone, however time runs out and you present the product as is, emphasizing it is a process driven work in progress.

    • B. 

      Consider the elements that most need direction and come prepared next session with some activities the group can use to work on these areas to incorporate into their final production.

    • C. 

      Decide it is time you stepped in and manage the process more directly to improve the product. That is part of your role as a professional creative facilitator.

    • D. 

      Start the next session with a discussion about how the participants feel about their product and discuss ways they could improve and enrich the process.

  • 6. 
    You are feeling emotionally challenged by some of the content being raised in your current project. How do you respond?
    • A. 

      Think back to the last time similar emotional issues arose for you and evaluate what strategies seem to help resolve these previous experiences. Then discuss these strategies with the key stakeholders affected by this project.

    • B. 

      Privately reflect on why this is challenging and implement some strategies for dealing with your emotions.

    • C. 

      Talk it through with a valued colleague, friend or loved one to find some strategies for processing your emotions.

    • D. 

      Turn the issues over in your mind in the wee hours of the morning, but find you can not get to the root of the issue or how to manage the experience beyond hoping it will just go away.

  • 7. 
    After a drought in work opportunities you are offered a series of paid projects, however they all overlap, leaving you little or no spare time. What do you do?
    • A. 

      Discuss the various projects with peers and family and see which of the offers you could manage with your current diary commitments.

    • B. 

      Say yes! Work is work and you can sleep when you’re gone.

    • C. 

      Evaluate the different projects based on past experiences including venue, stakeholders and payment, then use this information to rule out those offers that aren’t personally viable for you. Discuss the remaining options with your partner and work colleagues who may be affected by your decision to accept more commitments.

    • D. 

      Fret about which projects to accept and worry about whether you could manage your time effectively. You leave it long enough to realise you miss your opportunity with some of the projects and the decision has been made for you.

  • 8. 
    The venue you usually use for your work is no longer available. What do you do?
    • A. 

      Ask your friends and colleagues where they hire and choose a place based on word of mouth.

    • B. 

      Research a selection of appropriate venues and check their availability, then ask participants which would be more convenient.

    • C. 

      Think about alternative venues that may suit, although stress about organizing this so late in the piece.

    • D. 

      Go online and search for venues based on location and cost.

  • 9. 
    You have been asked to nominate one of your participants to represent your group at a community engagement forum. Who do you choose?
    • A. 

      You choose a few participants who would represent the group well and ask this small group to choose amongst themselves.

    • B. 

      You choose Ned because he has been to every class and is a confident speaker.

    • C. 

      You worry about singling anyone out so you mull over who should go, leaving it to the last minute you do the ring around to see who is free and willing.

    • D. 

      You ask the group to select who should go.

  • 10. 
    You and your group have been selected to perform at an opening event but it is same night you are booked for a regular performance at your local nursing home. How do you choose what to do?
    • A. 

      You can’t decide so try and juggle the timing, hoping you can fit both in.

    • B. 

      You share the dilemma with the group and discuss your options.

    • C. 

      You choose the opening event as it is a one off and the nursing home will still be there next month.

    • D. 

      You ring the nursing home and see if you can perform the following week and ask the group which day would suit them.

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