GRE Sample Question Test (Verbal Reasoning)

20 Questions | Total Attempts: 1344

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GRE Sample Question Test (Verbal Reasoning)

Verbal Reasoning section contains 20 questions which are to be solved in 30 minutes.


Questions and Answers
  • 1. 
    Very often, exhortations are made, “Forgive and forget”, reminding the listener also that forgiveness can not be complete with out forgetting it all. However, all know that unless afflicted by illness or amnesia, one can not erase memories, especially the bitter ones. Then, what is the purpose of it all? Would all talk on forgiving prove to be illusory? The answers lie in first understanding one’s actual objectivity, and also the very concept and purpose behind forgiveness. Addressing yourself, realize that the objective is, first and foremost, healing and benefitting yourself. Therefore, the main task in hand is to cleanse yourself of the trauma left behind by the gnawing agony and shock suffered in the knowledge that you have been wronged, taken for a ride and used. The primary purpose of the passage is to
    • A. 

      Discuss a problem and propose a solution.

    • B. 

      Discuss a problem and its ramifications.

    • C. 

      Discuss a problem and try to analyze that.

    • D. 

      Analyze the purpose for getting rid of and reach on the solution of the problem

    • E. 

      Analyze a problem which can not be resolved.

  • 2. 
    Very often, exhortations are made, “Forgive and forget”, reminding the listener also that forgiveness can not be complete with out forgetting it all. However, all know that unless afflicted by illness or amnesia, one can not erase memories, especially the bitter ones. Then, what is the purpose of it all? Would all talk on forgiving prove to be illusory? The answers lie in first understanding one’s actual objectivity, and also the very concept and purpose behind forgiveness. Addressing yourself, realize that the objective is, first and foremost, healing and benefitting yourself. Therefore, the main task in hand is to cleanse yourself of the trauma left behind by the gnawing agony and shock suffered in the knowledge that you have been wronged, taken for a ride and used. The passage implies that (select all that apply)
    • A. 

      Normally, it is difficult to erase bad memories.

    • B. 

      People resort to forgiveness mainly for self benefit.

    • C. 

      Forgetting is the only way for forgiveness.

  • 3. 
    Very often, exhortations are made, “Forgive and forget”, reminding the listener also that forgiveness can not be complete with out forgetting it all. However, all know that unless afflicted by illness or amnesia, one can not erase memories, especially the bitter ones. Then, what is the purpose of it all? Would all talk on forgiving prove to be illusory? The answers lie in first understanding one’s actual objectivity, and also the very concept and purpose behind forgiveness. Addressing yourself, realize that the objective is, first and foremost, healing and benefitting yourself. Therefore, the main task in hand is to cleanse yourself of the trauma left behind by the gnawing agony and shock suffered in the knowledge that you have been wronged, taken for a ride and used. What is the role of 3rd paragraph in the passage?
    • A. 

      It attempts to resolve the doubts raised in earlier paragraphs.

    • B. 

      Presents why forgiveness is required.

    • C. 

      Discusses the ways to forget the bad memories.

    • D. 

      It further elaborates the problem discussed in the passage.

    • E. 

      Presents how people achieve complete forgiveness.

  • 4. 
    • A. 

      The average effect on mortality in a large group of people may mask an effect of vitamin E on the lifespan.

    • B. 

      It is possible that a benefit on the oldest participants might be camouflaged by the large middle-aged majority of participants.

    • C. 

      It might be useful to analyze the effect of vitamin E supplementation on a small relevant participants.

    • D. 

      In a trial involving a small group of men with dietary vitamin C intake above the median, vitamin E extended life span by two years.

    • E. 

      The trials might have not included the men from different socio-economic and demographic groups.

  • 5. 
    Not that the prisoners would have been able to attempt much, …………………. as they were to stone slabs built into the wall.
    • A. 

      Attached

    • B. 

      Detached

    • C. 

      Chained

    • D. 

      Settled

    • E. 

      Pulled

  • 6. 
    Thousands of rogue alien planets may be …………………………….. space in our Milky Way, instead of being locked in orbit around a star.
    • A. 

      Moving through

    • B. 

      Rambling through

    • C. 

      In

    • D. 

      Available in

    • E. 

      Lying in

  • 7. 
    Aid softens the need for a government to forge a bond with citizens by ............................... revenue and ................................ those funds as services.
    • A. 

      (1) For first Blank

    • B. 

      Maintaining

    • C. 

      Neglecting

    • D. 

      Raising

    • E. 

      (2) For second Blank

    • F. 

      Redistributing

    • G. 

      Not using

    • H. 

      Utilizing

  • 8. 
    The corporate strategy today must be flexible enough to change constantly and to adapt to outside and internal conditions even as the …………………….to deliver favorable outcomes for shareholders remains constant. This approach implies an expectation that major midcourse ………………………..will be required, not that everything will go according to plan. It calls for ……………………………… to shut down initiatives if it becomes clear that they are headed nowhere.
    • A. 

      (1) For first Blank

    • B. 

      Aspiration

    • C. 

      Commitment

    • D. 

      Interest

    • E. 

      (2) For second Blank

    • F. 

      Adherence

    • G. 

      Corrections

    • H. 

      Judgments

    • I. 

      (3) For third Blank

    • J. 

      An action

    • K. 

      A willingness

    • L. 

      Patience

  • 9. 
    There may be 100,000 times more of wandering, homeless planets, which may not be locked in orbits, than stars in the Milky Way. If this is the case, these intriguing cosmic bodies would belong to a whole new class of alien worlds, shaking up existing theories of planet formation, and may also raise new and tantalizing questions in the search for life beyond Earth. If any of these nomad planets are big enough to have a thick atmosphere, they could have trapped enough heat for bacterial life to exist. And while nomad planets cannot benefit from the heat given off from their parent stars, these worlds could generate heat from tectonic activity or internal radioactive decay. For now, characteristics of these foreign objects are still unknown; they could be icy bodies, similar to other objects found in the outer solar system, rocky like asteroids, or gas giants similar to the most massive planets in our solar system.  The passage may be based on
    • A. 

      A voyage to one of these nomad planets.

    • B. 

      Available facts

    • C. 

      Astronomical study

    • D. 

      Study of theories of planet formation

    • E. 

      Study of theories of life formation

  • 10. 
    There may be 100,000 times more of wandering, homeless planets, which may not be locked in orbits, than stars in the Milky Way. If this is the case, these intriguing cosmic bodies would belong to a whole new class of alien worlds, shaking up existing theories of planet formation, and may also raise new and tantalizing questions in the search for life beyond Earth. If any of these nomad planets are big enough to have a thick atmosphere, they could have trapped enough heat for bacterial life to exist. And while nomad planets cannot benefit from the heat given off from their parent stars, these worlds could generate heat from tectonic activity or internal radioactive decay. For now, characteristics of these foreign objects are still unknown; they could be icy bodies, similar to other objects found in the outer solar system, rocky like asteroids, or gas giants similar to the most massive planets in our solar system.  Which part of the passage answers to some extent the question that in what way these wandering planets may be similar to some existing objects?
    • A. 

      There may be 100,000 times more of wandering, homeless planets, which may not be locked in orbits, than stars in the Milky Way.

    • B. 

      If this is the case, these intriguing cosmic bodies would belong to a whole new class of alien worlds, shaking up existing theories of planet formation, and may also raise new and tantalizing questions in the search for life beyond Earth.

    • C. 

      If any of these nomad planets are big enough to have a thick atmosphere, they could have trapped enough heat for bacterial life to exist.

    • D. 

      And while nomad planets cannot benefit from the heat given off from their parent stars, these worlds could generate heat from tectonic activity or internal radioactive decay.

    • E. 

      For now, characteristics of these foreign objects are still unknown; they could be icy bodies, similar to other objects found in the outer solar system, rocky like asteroids, or gas giants similar to the most massive planets in our solar system.

  • 11. 
    The meltdown in the Arctic is speeding up and as a result the North Pole could be ice-free within 5 years instead of 60 years time as earlier predicted. This is based on computer studies of satellite images that reveal that ice at North Pole melted at an unprecedented rate recently-the disappearance is said to have exceeded the record loss of more than a million square kilometers in 2007 as global warming tightened its grip. The crucial point is that ice is clearly not building up enough over winter to restore cover and that when you combine current estimates of ice thickness with the extent of the ice cap, you get a very clear indication that the Arctic is going to be ice free in five years.  In the above argument, the two portions in boldface play which of the following roles?
    • A. 

      The first is an apprehension against some belief; the second is the conclusion based on that apprehension.

    • B. 

      The first is a prediction based on some evidence; the second is that evidence.

    • C. 

      The first is the conclusion; the second is the assumption on which the conclusion is based.

    • D. 

      The first is an apprehension against some belief; the second is an explanation in support of that apprehension.

    • E. 

      The first is a prediction; the second is the explanation on which the prediction is based.

  • 12. 
    Almost all of these newfound worlds orbit stars, but last year, scientists found about a dozen planets with no ………………………. host stars. 
    • A. 

      Possible

    • B. 

      Concealed

    • C. 

      Orbiting

    • D. 

      Discernible

    • E. 

      Indistinct

  • 13. 
    It would be a mistake to hear only the rumbling accusations of electoral fraud and rule out the possibility of the new leadership pursuing such an agenda of …………………….
    • A. 

      Aggressiveness

    • B. 

      Upheaval

    • C. 

      Renewal

    • D. 

      Simplicity

    • E. 

      Suppression

  • 14. 
    There is a penchant for unusual names all over the world, supposedly culled from ancient texts or even scientific tomes. However, the move by celebrities to trademark their peculiar choice of names for their progeny takes the drive for ……………………….. a bit too far. Protecting their privacy is one thing, precluding anyone else ……………………….. their spark of nomenclature creativity – even as a sincere form of flattery – smacks more of …………………………than a genuine desire to make their offspring one-of-a-kind in the arena of internet name searches.
    • A. 

      For first Blank

    • B. 

      Uniqueness

    • C. 

      Decency

    • D. 

      Beleaguerment

    • E. 

      For second Blank

    • F. 

      Noticing

    • G. 

      Originating

    • H. 

      Imitating

    • I. 

      For third Blank

    • J. 

      Adversity

    • K. 

      Inadequacy

    • L. 

      Churlishness

  • 15. 
    The recent advertisement was enough to …………….. some people, and get it pulled off.
    • A. 

      Enrage

    • B. 

      Pacify

    • C. 

      Distract

    • D. 

      Appeal

    • E. 

      Engage

  • 16. 
    Despite the host of women-friendly laws enacted over the years, the ground reality has not changed for the women; partly because the necessary support mechanism is missing and partly because …………………………….social values are constantly being reinforced.
    • A. 

      Overprotective

    • B. 

      Vulnerable

    • C. 

      Anachronistic

    • D. 

      Tough

    • E. 

      Current

  • 17. 
    There is a critical need for a law that protects farmers’ interests and which can indemnify their losses in the event of their purchased farm inputs being proved to be ............................. (Select the two answer choices that, when used to complete the sentence, fit the meaning of the sentence as a whole and produce completed sentences that are alike in meaning.)
    • A. 

      Unvendible

    • B. 

      Spurious

    • C. 

      Unmerchantable

    • D. 

      Crappy

    • E. 

      Inferior

  • 18. 
    Anti-sweatshop activists see their tasks as convincing multinationals that whatever the cost of improved working conditions at their suppliers’ plants, it is less than the potential cost to their reputation of allowing workers to toil in sweatshop conditions. But they must not forget that the No.1 priority for most of suppliers’ workers is to keep their jobs. While outside pressure might improve their lives, it could also persuade suppliers to replace them. Many of the victories of consumer activists in the past turned a little sour. When brands get caught at one facility, and pressure is brought to bear, they can be forced to push for changes at that facility. However, if those changes raise costs and slow delivery times, it is easy enough, a year or two down the road, for the brand to reduce orders at that factory in favor of others. Which of the following can be inferred from the passage? (select all that apply)
    • A. 

      It is beneficial for the multinational companies to improve the working conditions at their suppliers’ plants.

    • B. 

      Anti-sweatshop movement may not always result in desired results.

    • C. 

      MNCs prefer to shift orders from a factory which is under activists attack.

  • 19. 
    Anti-sweatshop activists see their tasks as convincing multinationals that whatever the cost of improved working conditions at their suppliers’ plants, it is less than the potential cost to their reputation of allowing workers to toil in sweatshop conditions. But they must not forget that the No.1 priority for most of suppliers’ workers is to keep their jobs. While outside pressure might improve their lives, it could also persuade suppliers to replace them. Many of the victories of consumer activists in the past turned a little sour. When brands get caught at one facility, and pressure is brought to bear, they can be forced to push for changes at that facility. However, if those changes raise costs and slow delivery times, it is easy enough, a year or two down the road, for the brand to reduce orders at that factory in favor of others. Which part of the passage shows that the pressure of activists may backfire against individual workers?
    • A. 

      Anti-sweatshop activists see their tasks as convincing multinationals that whatever the cost of improved working conditions at their suppliers’ plants, it is less than the potential cost to their reputation of allowing workers to toil in sweatshop conditions.

    • B. 

      But they must not forget that the No.1 priority for most of suppliers’ workers is to keep their jobs.

    • C. 

      While outside pressure might improve their lives, it could also persuade suppliers to replace them.

    • D. 

      When brands get caught at one facility, and pressure is brought to bear, they can be forced to push for changes at that facility.

    • E. 

      However, if those changes raise costs and slow delivery times, it is easy enough, a year or two down the road, for the brand to reduce orders at that factory in favor of others.

  • 20. 
    Anti-sweatshop activists see their tasks as convincing multinationals that whatever the cost of improved working conditions at their suppliers’ plants, it is less than the potential cost to their reputation of allowing workers to toil in sweatshop conditions. But they must not forget that the No.1 priority for most of suppliers’ workers is to keep their jobs. While outside pressure might improve their lives, it could also persuade suppliers to replace them. Many of the victories of consumer activists in the past turned a little sour. When brands get caught at one facility, and pressure is brought to bear, they can be forced to push for changes at that facility. However, if those changes raise costs and slow delivery times, it is easy enough, a year or two down the road, for the brand to reduce orders at that factory in favor of others. What can be inferred about anti-sweatshop movements EXCEPT
    • A. 

      These may not always lead to desired results.

    • B. 

      These may deviate MNCs from their main goal of maximizing profit.

    • C. 

      These may negatively impact suppliers.

    • D. 

      These movements need to observe caution.

    • E. 

      These have been successful in forcing MNCs to make changes in the facilities.