Film- Prof. 1- Term One Test (Exam Review)

25 Questions | Total Attempts: 71

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Questions and Answers
  • 1. 
    Critic Roger Ebert compares Crash to some other “cross-cutting Los Angeles stories” such as Grand Canyon (dir. Lawrence Kasdan) and Short Cuts (dir. Robert Altman). The term “cross-cutting” refers to
    • A. 

      A film style that conveys anger at social injustice

    • B. 

      A movement between different story lines

    • C. 

      Alternating attention given to different races

    • D. 

      The use of split screen techniques for displaying social conflict

  • 2. 
    In Crash, there is one sequence showing Officer Ryan interacting with his father. The way in which the sequence is edited seems designed to 
    • A. 

      Provide the spectator with an escalating sense of tension

    • B. 

      Build a rhythmic beat into the portrayal of the two mens actions

    • C. 

      Allow the spectator to enter the close, emotionally relationship between the father and the son

    • D. 

      Focus the viewers attention, alternately on each mans conflicted emotion

  • 3. 
    A film editor has to make many choices in assembling a sequence. In working on the sequence of Officer Ryan interacting with his father as it appeared in Crash, the editor would NOT have had to decide
    • A. 

      The order of successive shots

    • B. 

      When to cut to the next scene

    • C. 

      To end the sequence, with a wipe, dissolve, fade OR cut

    • D. 

      Among different takes

  • 4. 
    In The Cutting Edge, we are told that, historically, editing is a phase of filmmaking that began to develop when
    • A. 

      A studios established different departments to industrialize studio actions

    • B. 

      Early silent film makers, began to tell stories, rather then show simple incidents

    • C. 

      Competition with television, made film makers want to do more

    • D. 

      Computers were able to store, and change movies

  • 5. 
    Vinca Wiedemann argues in “Film Editing—A Hidden Art?” that “most of us have great difficulty in consciously perceiving the editing” in a successful film. This is because
    • A. 

      Successful films prompt spectators to use their imaginations, between the gap of one shot to the next

    • B. 

      Plot and dialogue are much more important to a film, then the gap between shots

    • C. 

      Successful films achieve seamless continuity between shots

    • D. 

      Successful films appeal to emotional and not the ability to peel apart the film

  • 6. 
    According to the "Rule of Six" formulated by Walter Murch as the basis for describing the ideal edit, the most important reason for making a cut from one shot to another is that it
    • A. 

      Is true to the emotion of the scene

    • B. 

      Propels the plot forward

    • C. 

      Happens at a rhythmically right moment

    • D. 

      Acknowledges the audiences focus as interest

  • 7. 
    Any filmed action or conversation, such as a sequence of characters playing chess or walking along a street, has an “axis of action”. An axis of action is
    • A. 

      The imaginary line that lies between the camera lens and the main point of action

    • B. 

      The horizon behind the characters, that is ultimately limiting their movement

    • C. 

      The imaginary horizontal line between the characters being photographed: the main ones

    • D. 

      The line that guides the characters through the movements, in the scene being shot

  • 8. 
    The phrase “continuity editing” is best understood as meaning 
    • A. 

      Editing that extends the intentions of the director, toward the results of the final print of the film

    • B. 

      Editing practices that relates strictly to the editing directions in a script

    • C. 

      The process of beginning to edit a film, one that is still in production

    • D. 

      Editing techniques, used to tell a story in the best way possible

  • 9. 
    N Burnt by the Sun, there is a scene consisting of long shots of characters in a hallway at the dacha alternating with big close-ups of Marussya pouring a glass of water. This scene is a good example of what Barsam and Monahan refer to as
    • A. 

      A modern use of the Koshev effect

    • B. 

      A sequence shot

    • C. 

      The use of shot/ reverse shot in sequence construction

    • D. 

      Intercutting

  • 10. 
    Editor/director Edward Dmytryk argued, among other things, that “All scenes should begin and end with continuing action.” In film, a “scene” is usually considered to be
    • A. 

      A unit of action in which the plot takes a decisive turn

    • B. 

      A complete unit of plot action, incorporating one or more shots

    • C. 

      The individual still image exposed by the camera

    • D. 

      An event taking place at a considerable distance from the camera

  • 11. 
    The “Arrival of the Summer Santa” scene in Burnt by the Sun may be said to begin with continuing action because
    • A. 

      The band carrying Stalin's image is already playing and marching

    • B. 

      The scene picks up and continues the plot line begun earlier with Mitya's telephone call

    • C. 

      In earlier scenes the band was seen in the distance as it approached the dacha

    • D. 

      Nadya, who appeared in the previous scene, appears at the dacha gate

  • 12. 
    Your choice of how to edit the sequence in order to NOT show the violent action itself stems from Sergei Eisenstein's view that editing causes spectators to generate ideas when the flow of film action is subjected to
    • A. 

      Displacement

    • B. 

      Discontinuity

    • C. 

      Patterning

    • D. 

      Linkage

  • 13. 
    Nikita Mikhalkov, the director of Burnt by the Sun, said of the film that “I did not set out to make a film just about the past, I intended to say something about the present as well.” That is, although the film was set in 1936, it was intended to touch on attitudes current in
    • A. 

      The USSR during WW 2

    • B. 

      Moscow during the rule of Czar

    • C. 

      Post- Soviet Russia

    • D. 

      The era of Stalin's dictatorship

  • 14. 
    The director Takeshi Kitano has been quoted as saying that his purpose in making Fireworks (Hana-Bi) was to show
    • A. 

      The close relations between organized crime and the Japanese police

    • B. 

      The Japanese yearning for the simple ways of the past

    • C. 

      A Japanese man's attempt to fulfill his responsibilities

    • D. 

      The imbalance of gender relations in Japan at the time

  • 15. 
    A pillow shot is generally thought of as
    • A. 

      An empty shot on which the attention of the spectator can come to rest

    • B. 

      Shot in which the background is soft and indistinct

    • C. 

      Shot of two lovers asleep on a traditional Japanese mat

    • D. 

      Shot taken at early evening

  • 16. 
    Especially in its first half, Fireworks (Hana-Bi) is constructed by editing that
    • A. 

      Uses a disruptive style- unsettling and proactive

    • B. 

      Ensures that the spectator is always clearly oriented in time and space

    • C. 

      Creates a smooth flow of continuous action

    • D. 

      Captures whole scenes in unbroken shots

  • 17. 
    The cut between these two shots in Fireworks (Hana-Bi) exemplifies the concept-generating principle that Sergei Eisenstein located in the Japanese system of writing, and that he referred to as 
    • A. 

      Montage

    • B. 

      Jump cut

    • C. 

      Parallel editing

    • D. 

      Dis- continuity

  • 18. 
    Whether you are editing the scene for intensified or classical continuity, you might want the viewer to feel a rising tension as Rick and Ilsa begin to quarrel. Your method for achieving this would involve 
    • A. 

      Adhering to the 180 degree rule

    • B. 

      Providing a clear understanding of the spacial dimensions in the scene

    • C. 

      Beginning each shot with an action, that has already been underway

    • D. 

      Shaping the rhythmic pattern of successive shots

  • 19. 
    Here are two successive shots from a sequence of The Insider shown in class. The character has not moved from his position at a table. Cutting to the second shot from the first suggests
    • A. 

      Sloppy editing

    • B. 

      Filmmakers willingness to provoke viewer engagement through disorientation

    • C. 

      Attempt to show both sides

    • D. 

      Intention to adhere to the 180 degree rule, despite the requirements of the story

  • 20. 
    The term “intensified continuity” refers to the tendency in recent popular cinema to
    • A. 

      Observe the norms of classical continuity, but with a more emphatic visual style

    • B. 

      Construct whole films from continuous series of sequence shots

    • C. 

      Avoid breaks

    • D. 

      Edit films so as to create continuous dialogue

  • 21. 
    When David Bordwell formulated his description of common components of today’s “intensified continuity”, he did NOT include
    • A. 

      Stationary camera

    • B. 

      A free- ranging camera

    • C. 

      Close framings in dialogue scenes

    • D. 

      Rapid editing

  • 22. 
    The director might want the viewer to see and hear what it is like for Rick and Ilsa to be surrounded by other diners and the activity of the busy restaurant as their conversation turns into an argument and then a fight. In this case, the editing option that you suggest to the director is
    • A. 

      Constructing the sequence from shots with the least depth of field

    • B. 

      Using a split screen technique

    • C. 

      Using the uncut master shot for most of the sequence

    • D. 

      Substituting wipes for cuts in the editing of the sequence

  • 23. 
    Slumdog Millionaire takes place largely in
    • A. 

      Mumbai

    • B. 

      New Delhi

    • C. 

      Agra

    • D. 

      Africa

  • 24. 
             Marks: 1 Here are two successive shots from a sequence in Slumdog Millionaire. Together, the two shots exemplify an important editing pattern usually called
    • A. 

      Intercutting

    • B. 

      Shot/ reverse shot

    • C. 

      Match on action

    • D. 

      Parallel editing

  • 25. 
    Time code usually means
    • A. 

      The relationship between the running time of the film and the time it took to make it

    • B. 

      Uses of costumes, decor... to set a time in a particular period of time

    • C. 

      Necessity of differing between a film from beginning to the end

    • D. 

      System for identifying individual frames in film

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