Elizabethan Theatre Trivia: How Well You Know? Quiz

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Elizabethan Theatre Trivia: How Well You Know? Quiz - Quiz


How well do you know the Elizabethan Theatre? Would you be able to ACE this quiz? You can call Elizabethan Theatre English Renaissance Theatre. The height of the Elizabethan Theatre came around the time when Shakespeare first came on the scene. During this quiz, you will have to demonstrate your knowledge by answering questions like where the first Elizabethan theatre was built. This thrilling quiz will aid in your discovery of the Elizabethan Theatre. All the best.


Questions and Answers
  • 1. 

    Where was the first Elizabethan Theatre built?

    • A.

      Luton

    • B.

      Leicester

    • C.

      Birmingham

    • D.

      Shoreditch

    • E.

      Bath

    Correct Answer
    D. Shoreditch
    Explanation
    The first Elizabethan Theatre was built in Shoreditch. Shoreditch was a popular location for theaters during the Elizabethan era, and it was here that the Theatre, the first purpose-built theater in London, was constructed in 1576. This theater was the birthplace of many of William Shakespeare's plays and marked the beginning of a flourishing theatrical scene in London.

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  • 2. 

    Which successful Elizabethan writer died at a young age when he received a knife in the eye during a tavern fight?

    • A.

      William Shakespeare

    • B.

      Francis Beaumont (1584 - 1616)

    • C.

      Christopher Marlow

    • D.

      Thomas Middleton

    • E.

      John Fletcher (1579 - 1625)

    Correct Answer
    C. Christopher Marlow
    Explanation
    Christopher Marlowe, a successful Elizabethan writer, died at a young age when he received a knife in the eye during a tavern fight. Marlowe was a contemporary of William Shakespeare and was known for his influential plays and poetry. His untimely death at the age of 29 cut short a promising career and left a significant impact on the literary world.

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  • 3. 

    Who is not an Elizabethan actor?

    • A.

      Alec Guinness

    • B.

      Edward Alleyn

    • C.

      Robert Armin

    • D.

      Christopher Beeston

    • E.

      Richard Burbage

    Correct Answer
    A. Alec Guinness
    Explanation
    Alec Guinness is not an Elizabethan actor because he was born in 1914, long after the Elizabethan era ended. The Elizabethan era refers to the reign of Queen Elizabeth I, which occurred from 1558 to 1603. Therefore, Alec Guinness could not have been an actor during that time period.

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  • 4. 

    Where were Elizabethan performances held?

    • A.

      Churches, Taverns and Fairs

    • B.

      Playhouses, Amphitheatres and Inn Yards

    • C.

      Schools, Houses and Government Buildings

    • D.

      Taverns, Schools and Playhouses

    • E.

      Fairs, Inn Yards and Amphitheatres

    Correct Answer
    B. Playhouses, Amphitheatres and Inn Yards
    Explanation
    During the Elizabethan era, performances were held in playhouses, amphitheatres, and inn yards. Playhouses were purpose-built theaters where professional actors performed plays. Amphitheatres were circular or oval-shaped outdoor theaters that accommodated a larger audience. Inn yards were open spaces within inns where traveling acting troupes would perform. These locations provided the necessary space and infrastructure for staging and audience seating, making them ideal venues for Elizabethan performances.

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  • 5. 

    What is the role of a Housekeeper?

    • A.

      Cleaning the theatre

    • B.

      Maintenance of the theatre

    • C.

      Looking after actors

    • D.

      Looking after the costume and props

    • E.

      The owners of the theatre

    Correct Answer
    E. The owners of the theatre
    Explanation
    The role of a Housekeeper is to clean and maintain the theatre. They are responsible for ensuring that the theatre is clean and presentable for the audience. This includes tasks such as sweeping, mopping, dusting, and organizing. They also take care of the maintenance of the theatre, ensuring that everything is in working order and any repairs or replacements are made as needed. Their main focus is on the cleanliness and upkeep of the theatre, rather than looking after actors, costumes, or props.

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  • 6. 

    From what theatre was timber taken from to build the original Globe?

    • A.

      Rose

    • B.

      Theatre

    • C.

      Swan

    • D.

      Fortune

    • E.

      Boars Head

    Correct Answer
    B. Theatre
    Explanation
    The timber to build the original Globe Theatre was taken from the Theatre.

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  • 7. 

    What date did the Globe burn down?

    • A.

      July 4th 1614

    • B.

      June 29 1613

    • C.

      August 27th 1613

    • D.

      June 29th 1615

    • E.

      July 4th 1613

    Correct Answer
    B. June 29 1613
    Explanation
    The correct answer is June 29, 1613. This date refers to the day when the Globe Theatre in London burned down. The fire was caused by a cannon shot during a performance of Shakespeare's play "Henry VIII." The fire quickly spread and destroyed the entire theater, causing significant damage. This event was a significant setback for the theater industry at the time.

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  • 8. 

    During which play did a cannon fire and set fire to the roof of the Globe Theatre?

    • A.

      Ben Jonson's Volpone

    • B.

      Dekker's Shoemaker's Holiday

    • C.

      Webster's The White Devil

    • D.

      Beaumont & Fletcher's The Knight of the Burning Pestle

    • E.

      William Shakespeare's Henry VIII

    Correct Answer
    E. William Shakespeare's Henry VIII
    Explanation
    During the performance of William Shakespeare's Henry VIII, a cannon was fired on stage, which accidentally caused the thatched roof of the Globe Theatre to catch fire. This incident is well-documented in historical records and is considered a significant event in the history of the Globe Theatre.

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  • 9. 

    What is the area in front of the stage in an Amphitheatre called?

    • A.

      Lower Deck

    • B.

      Cobbles

    • C.

      Pit

    • D.

      Ground

    • E.

      Level

    Correct Answer
    C. Pit
    Explanation
    The area in front of the stage in an Amphitheatre is called the "pit." This term is commonly used to refer to the area where audience members stand or sit closest to the stage, typically in an open-air venue like an amphitheater. The pit provides a closer and more immersive experience for the audience, allowing them to be in close proximity to the performers.

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  • 10. 

    How much did the public pay to go to theatre performances?

    • A.

      10 pennies

    • B.

      5 shillings

    • C.

      1 shilling

    • D.

      1 penny

    • E.

      2 pennies

    Correct Answer
    D. 1 penny
    Explanation
    The public paid 1 penny to go to theatre performances.

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  • 11. 

    Who was James Burbage?

    • A.

      An Elizabethan Entrepreneur

    • B.

      An Elizabethan Housekeeper

    • C.

      A Nobleman

    • D.

      An Inn Keeper

    • E.

      A playwright

    Correct Answer
    A. An Elizabethan Entrepreneur
    Explanation
    James Burbage was an Elizabethan entrepreneur who played a significant role in the development of the English theatre industry. He was the founder and owner of The Theatre, the first purpose-built theatre in London. Burbage's entrepreneurial spirit led him to establish a permanent venue for theatrical performances, which paved the way for the flourishing of English drama during the Elizabethan era. His contribution as an entrepreneur in the theatre industry made him a key figure in the history of English theatre.

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  • 12. 

    James Burbage became a member and eventually took over Robert Dudley's acting troupe. Who were they?

    • A.

      The Globe Players

    • B.

      The Coventry Actors

    • C.

      Leicester's Men

    • D.

      Birmingham Players

    • E.

      London's Men

    Correct Answer
    C. Leicester's Men
    Explanation
    James Burbage became a member and eventually took over Robert Dudley's acting troupe. The correct answer is Leicester's Men. This suggests that the acting troupe that James Burbage joined and later took over was known as Leicester's Men.

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  • 13. 

    In what year were theatres and playhouses were ordered to be pulled down and all players were to be seized and whipped?

    • A.

      1641

    • B.

      1645

    • C.

      1642

    • D.

      1648

    • E.

      1647

    Correct Answer
    D. 1648
    Explanation
    In 1648, theatres and playhouses were ordered to be pulled down and all players were to be seized and whipped. This suggests that there was a significant crackdown on theatrical performances during this year, likely due to religious or moral concerns. The authorities at the time may have believed that theatre was a corrupting influence on society and sought to suppress it through these measures.

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  • 14. 

    How much were people charged if they attended a play after they were banned?

    • A.

      10 Pennies

    • B.

      1 Penny

    • C.

      10 Shillings

    • D.

      Five Shillings

    • E.

      A pound

    Correct Answer
    D. Five Shillings
    Explanation
    People were charged Five Shillings if they attended a play after they were banned.

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  • 15. 

    What other events happened in Elizabethan Theatres?

    • A.

      Gambling and Fairs

    • B.

      Bear Baiting and Gambling

    • C.

      Fairs and Markets

    • D.

      Markets and Bear Baiting

    • E.

      Bull Fights and Markets

    Correct Answer
    B. Bear Baiting and Gambling
    Explanation
    In Elizabethan Theatres, besides theatrical performances, bear baiting and gambling were also common events. Bear baiting involved tying a bear to a post and setting dogs on it for entertainment. Gambling, on the other hand, was a popular activity where people would place bets on various games and sports. These events provided additional entertainment options for the audience and were often held in the same venues as theatrical performances.

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  • 16. 

    In the style of which theatre was the Globe built?

    • A.

      Royal Opera House

    • B.

      Bull Ring

    • C.

      Coliseum

    • D.

      Sydney Opera House

    • E.

      Swan

    Correct Answer
    C. Coliseum
    Explanation
    The Globe was built in the style of the Coliseum theatre.

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  • 17. 

    Why were performances in Amphitheatres only held during the afternoon?

    • A.

      Other entertainment happened in the evening

    • B.

      Nobles voted best time

    • C.

      To suit working hours

    • D.

      No artificial light

    • E.

      Elizabeth I decreed it

    Correct Answer
    D. No artificial light
    Explanation
    Performances in Amphitheatres were only held during the afternoon because there was no artificial light available. Amphitheatres were open-air venues that relied on natural sunlight for illumination. Holding performances in the afternoon ensured that there was enough daylight for the audience to see the actors and enjoy the show. Without artificial light sources, it would have been difficult for performances to take place in the evening or at night, when visibility would have been severely limited.

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  • 18. 

    Which is not a famous Elizabethan Playhouse?

    • A.

      Bull Ring

    • B.

      Whitefriars Theatre

    • C.

      Gray's Inn Theatre

    • D.

      Middle Temple Inn Theatre

    • E.

      Whitehall Theatre

    Correct Answer
    A. Bull Ring
    Explanation
    The Bull Ring is not a famous Elizabethan Playhouse. The other options, Whitefriars Theatre, Gray's Inn Theatre, Middle Temple Inn Theatre, and Whitehall Theatre, were all well-known playhouses during the Elizabethan era. However, there is no historical evidence or record of a playhouse called the Bull Ring during that time.

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  • 19. 

    What was the maximum capacity of an Elizabethan audience?

    • A.

      2500

    • B.

      3000

    • C.

      2000

    • D.

      5000

    • E.

      1000

    Correct Answer
    B. 3000
    Explanation
    During the Elizabethan era, the maximum capacity of an audience was 3000. This suggests that theaters during this time were able to accommodate a large number of people, indicating the popularity and demand for entertainment in Elizabethan England. The high capacity also implies that theater was a significant form of social and cultural gathering, highlighting the importance of drama and performance in the Elizabethan society.

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  • 20. 

    Who was not allowed to perform in Elizabethan plays?

    • A.

      Inn workers

    • B.

      Children

    • C.

      Over 40's

    • D.

      Women

    • E.

      Men

    Correct Answer
    D. Women
    Explanation
    During the Elizabethan era, women were not allowed to perform in plays. Instead, men would play both male and female roles. This was due to societal norms and the belief that it was inappropriate for women to be involved in acting. Women were seen as delicate and their involvement in the theater was considered scandalous. As a result, men would often dress in women's clothing and use exaggerated gestures and voices to portray female characters on stage.

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Our quizzes are rigorously reviewed, monitored and continuously updated by our expert board to maintain accuracy, relevance, and timeliness.

  • Current Version
  • Mar 22, 2023
    Quiz Edited by
    ProProfs Editorial Team
  • Nov 10, 2008
    Quiz Created by
    Redrae
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