Educational Travel Week: England Destination Quiz

Approved & Edited by ProProfs Editorial Team
The editorial team at ProProfs Quizzes consists of a select group of subject experts, trivia writers, and quiz masters who have authored over 10,000 quizzes taken by more than 100 million users. This team includes our in-house seasoned quiz moderators and subject matter experts. Our editorial experts, spread across the world, are rigorously trained using our comprehensive guidelines to ensure that you receive the highest quality quizzes.
Learn about Our Editorial Process
| By Exploricaonline
E
Exploricaonline
Community Contributor
Quizzes Created: 6 | Total Attempts: 4,033
Questions: 10 | Attempts: 92

SettingsSettingsSettings
Educational Travel Week: England Destination Quiz - Quiz


Brilliant! You’ve decided to join us for a spot of questions related to Ye Olde England. Think you have what it takes? Right then. Get to it and have a jolly good time.


Questions and Answers
  • 1. 

    The Brits have been known to get hot around the collar on occasion, but rarely does that have to do with the weather. The highest temperature EVER recorded in England was...

    • A.

      88.7°F

    • B.

      96.3°F

    • C.

      101.5°F

    • D.

      110.3°

    Correct Answer
    C. 101.5°F
    Explanation
    The correct answer is 101.5°F. This is the highest temperature ever recorded in England. The question mentions that the Brits rarely get hot due to the weather, implying that extremely high temperatures are uncommon in England. Therefore, the highest temperature recorded would likely be on the higher end of the options given, making 101.5°F the most plausible answer.

    Rate this question:

  • 2. 

    Ready to get spooked? It is said that the Athelhampton House in Dorset is haunted by none other than…

    • A.

      A headless horseman

    • B.

      An ape

    • C.

      A former chambermaid

    • D.

      A bat

    Correct Answer
    B. An ape
    Explanation
    An ape is an unexpected and intriguing choice for a haunted figure in a house. This answer stands out from the more common ghostly entities like a headless horseman or a former chambermaid. The idea of an ape haunting a house adds an element of surprise and curiosity to the spooky tale. It also brings a sense of mystery as to why an ape would be haunting the Athelhampton House, making it an interesting and unique choice for a haunted presence.

    Rate this question:

  • 3. 

    Cheerio old chap. You’re doing bloody good so far. But do you know what the official language of England was from 1066 to 1362?

    • A.

      English

    • B.

      French

    • C.

      Latin

    • D.

      Spanish

    Correct Answer
    B. French
    Explanation
    The official language of England from 1066 to 1362 was French. This is because in 1066, William the Conqueror, a French-speaking Norman, became the King of England. As a result, French became the language of the ruling class and the government, while English was spoken by the common people. The use of French as the official language gradually declined after 1362, when English started to regain its prominence.

    Rate this question:

  • 4. 

    Fancy yourself a scholar? Then you’ll want to make your way to this small village at the border of England and Wales where you’ll find the world’s largest second-hand book market.

    • A.

      Hay-on-Wye

    • B.

      Lacock

    • C.

      Castle Combe

    • D.

      Dunster

    Correct Answer
    A. Hay-on-Wye
    Explanation
    Hay-on-Wye is the correct answer because it is described as the location of the world's largest second-hand book market. The passage states that if you fancy yourself a scholar, you should make your way to this small village, implying that it is a popular destination for book lovers. The other options, Lacock, Castle Combe, and Dunster, are not mentioned in the passage and do not have any connection to being a book market.

    Rate this question:

  • 5. 

    Everybody’s heard of Big Ben, right? It’s that big clock tower in London, right? Actually, Big Ben is the name of the bell inside the tower. So what is the actual name of the tower?   

    • A.

      St. Stephens Tower

    • B.

      The Tower of London

    • C.

      Tower Hamlets

    • D.

      Fawlty Towers

    Correct Answer
    A. St. Stephens Tower
    Explanation
    The correct answer is St. Stephens Tower. Big Ben is actually the name of the bell inside the tower, not the tower itself. The tower is officially known as St. Stephens Tower.

    Rate this question:

  • 6. 

    Speaking of London, it wasn’t always known as London, per se. Over the years it’s had several different names. Which of the following was not one of them?

    • A.

      Londonium

    • B.

      Ludenwic

    • C.

      Lourdes

    • D.

      Ludenberg

    Correct Answer
    C. Lourdes
    Explanation
    Lourdes is not one of the names that London has been known as over the years. The other options, Londonium, Ludenwic, and Ludenberg, have all been used to refer to London at different points in history. However, Lourdes is not a historical name associated with the city.

    Rate this question:

  • 7. 

    Answering all of these questions sure can work up an appetite. If you were to order “Toad in the hole”, what do you suppose would show up on your plate?

    • A.

      Sausages in Yorkshire pudding

    • B.

      Fried pork in a hollowed out popover

    • C.

      Steak and kidney pie

    • D.

      Bacon and kippers

    Correct Answer
    A. Sausages in Yorkshire pudding
    Explanation
    "Toad in the hole" is a traditional British dish consisting of sausages cooked in a Yorkshire pudding batter. The sausages are placed in a baking dish and then covered with the batter, which is made from flour, eggs, and milk. The dish is then baked until the batter is golden and puffed up. When served, the sausages are nestled within the Yorkshire pudding, creating a hearty and flavorful meal.

    Rate this question:

  • 8. 

    Any visit to jolly old England wouldn’t be complete without stopping by 'The Old Lady of Threadneedle Street'. Who or what are we referring to?

    • A.

      The Queen

    • B.

      The Bank of England

    • C.

      St. Paul’s Cathedral

    • D.

      Margaret Thatcher’s Residence

    Correct Answer
    B. The Bank of England
    Explanation
    The correct answer is The Bank of England. The phrase "The Old Lady of Threadneedle Street" is a nickname for the Bank of England, which is located on Threadneedle Street in London. The nickname is derived from the bank's long history and its prominent role in the financial sector.

    Rate this question:

  • 9. 

    For nearly 200 years, contestants have gathered at the top of Cooper’s Hill in Gloucester to chase this particular “item” down the hill…

    • A.

      A rabbit

    • B.

      A greased watermelon

    • C.

      A wheel of cheese

    • D.

      A football (Or, as we would call it, a soccer ball)

    Correct Answer
    C. A wheel of cheese
    Explanation
    Every year, contestants gather at the top of Cooper's Hill in Gloucester to participate in a unique event called the Cheese Rolling. During this event, a wheel of cheese is rolled down the hill, and participants chase after it. The first person to reach the bottom of the hill wins the cheese. This tradition has been going on for nearly 200 years and attracts both locals and tourists to witness this thrilling and unusual competition.

    Rate this question:

  • 10. 

    You’ve heard of Stonehenge. You’ve seen pictures of Stonehenge. You can’t explain Stonehenge. But if you were to visit, where would you find Stonehenge?

    • A.

      Wiltshire County

    • B.

      Gloucesterhire County

    • C.

      Oxfordshire County

    • D.

      Berkshire County

    Correct Answer
    A. Wiltshire County
    Explanation
    Stonehenge is located in Wiltshire County.

    Rate this question:

Back to Top Back to top
Advertisement
×

Wait!
Here's an interesting quiz for you.

We have other quizzes matching your interest.