Trivia Quiz: What Do You Know About Thomas Paine Crisis No 1?

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Trivia Quiz: What Do You Know About Thomas Paine Crisis No 1?

What Do You Know About Thomas Paine Crisis No 1? British rule over America was seen as tyrannical, and Thomas wrote the pamphlet to call on his fellow Americans to fight back on the British. Take this quiz to check your understanding of Thomas Paine's speech. When you are satisfied with your results, take a screenshot and submit them on the following page.


Questions and Answers
  • 1. 
    • A. 

      a. Describe the current status of the war

    • B. 

      b. Plead for lower taxes

    • C. 

      c. Urge the Americans to greater action and commitment against the British

    • D. 

      d. List in detail the misdeeds of King George

  • 2. 
    • A. 

      a. The time for armed struggle is over.

    • B. 

      b. Colonists who support Britain are weak and cowardly.

    • C. 

      c. The king of Britain is a fool.

    • D. 

      d. The colonists must endure and keep fighting.

  • 3. 
    • A. 

      a. he is glad America is at war so that he can display his leadership skills

    • B. 

      b. better that there is war now and peace later for my child

    • C. 

      c. he thinks God is angry with America and is punishing them with war

    • D. 

      d. he is indifferent; he doesn't care one way or the other

  • 4. 
    What literary term is being used in the following example?: "Heaven knows how to put a proper price upon its goods."
    • A. 

      A. alliteration

    • B. 

      B. assonance

    • C. 

      C. repetition

    • D. 

      D. simile

  • 5. 
    Paine's primary purpose for saying that "a common murderer, a highwayman, or a house-breaker, has as good a pretense as [the king]" is to
    • A. 

      a. Show how the common criminal is persecuted by the king's representatives

    • B. 

      b. Stress the lawlessness of the king's actions

    • C. 

      c. Emphasize the notion of democracy

    • D. 

      d. Appeal to his audience's fear of crime