Checking Out Mi History

22 Questions | Total Attempts: 268

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History Quizzes & Trivia

Questions and Answers
  • 1. 
    The narrator uses a mixture of stanza forms. This suggests that he is breaking the confining language rules he has been taught by those who are seeking to erase his identity
    • A. 

      True

    • B. 

      False

  • 2. 
    What is ironic about the title of the poem?
    • A. 

      The narrator is not learning about his history

    • B. 

      The narrator is learning about his history

    • C. 

      The narrator has no interest in history

    • D. 

      There is no history in the poem

  • 3. 
    Which of the following lines are used by the narrator to emphasise the separateness of the British education system from himself?
    • A. 

      Repetition of 'Dem tell me"

    • B. 

      Repetition of Toussaint

    • C. 

      Use of creole

    • D. 

      Mention of historical figures

  • 4. 
    Which of the following are used by the speaker as a metaphor for the deliberate attempts by British education system to hide his history and prevent him from seeing his own history?
    • A. 

      Blind me to me own identity (.l.5)

    • B. 

      Wha dem want to tell me (l.3)

    • C. 

      No dem neva tell me bout dat (l. 9)

    • D. 

      Dem tell me bout de man who discover de balloon ( l.22)

  • 5. 
    Which of the following does the speaker use to make British history sound trivial, childish and silly while linking it to the oral traditions of the Caribbean?
    • A. 

      Images of light

    • B. 

      The simple rhyme scheme and the use of nursery rhymes

    • C. 

      Skipping quickly over British figures and covering Caribbean figures in more detail

    • D. 

      Repetition, strong rhythms and the use of phonetic spelling

  • 6. 
    Which of the following are positive and suggest an awareness of your own identity?
    • A. 

      Images of light

    • B. 

      Mention of Caribbean historical figures

    • C. 

      Mention of British historical figures

    • D. 

      Use of oral poetry features

  • 7. 
    Which of the following lines sounds like a chant?
    • A. 

      Lines 1-3

    • B. 

      Lines 4-5

    • C. 

      Lines 6-9

    • D. 

      Lines 10-20

    • E. 

      Lines 31-34

  • 8. 
    The repetition of the word Toussaint creates 
    • A. 

      a confident and forceful mood

    • B. 

      A feeling of fear and pride

    • C. 

      A feeling of anger and shame

    • D. 

      A sense of blindness and uncertainty

  • 9. 
    Which of the following historical figures are linked to the wider universe as well as images of light, hope and warmth?
    • A. 

      Toussaint

    • B. 

      Nanny

    • C. 

      Florence Nightingale

    • D. 

      Mary Seacole

  • 10. 
    The speaker uses Standard English in lines 46-49 to suggest that important historical Caribbean heroes should feature in the teaching of history.
    • A. 

      True

    • B. 

      False

  • 11. 
    The speaker is happy that he is unaware of his Caribbean heritage even though it is an important part of who he is.
    • A. 

      True

    • B. 

      False

  • 12. 
    The speaker admires and respects the Caribbean figures he describes in the poem. 
    • A. 

      True

    • B. 

      False

  • 13. 
    Which of the following lines deliberately undermines the importance of a historical figure by making him/her appear childish, basic and unimportant by linking him/her to folklore and nursery rhyme characters?
    • A. 

      Dem tell me bout Lord Nelson and Waterloo (l. 31)

    • B. 

      Dem tell me bout Florence Nightingale and she lamp ( l.36)

    • C. 

      Nanny/see far woman (l.25-26)

    • D. 

      Dem tell me wha dem want to tell mi (l. 51)

  • 14. 
    Which of the following does the speaker use to set himself in opposition to mainstream British society?
    • A. 

      Repetition of the phrase 'Dem tell me"

    • B. 

      Use of contrast e.g. dem tell me bout.../but dem neva tell me bout...

    • C. 

      Ironic use of the word bandage in line 5

  • 15. 
    Which of the following images are ironic as the act should aid healing but actually promotes blindness and ignorance?
    • A. 

      Dem tell me

    • B. 

      A slave/with vision

    • C. 

      Bandage up me eye

    • D. 

      Even when the British said no

  • 16. 
    Which of the following is used to create a sense of pride in the speaker's background and heritage?
    • A. 

      No dem neva tell me bout dat

    • B. 

      Strong rhymes and broken syntax

    • C. 

      Use of Standard English

    • D. 

      Use of phonetic spelling to imitate Caribbean speech

  • 17. 
    ALL of the following are techniques from the oral tradition of reciting poetry EXCEPT
    • A. 

      Use of Standard English

    • B. 

      Repetition

    • C. 

      Strong rhythms

    • D. 

      Chanting

    • E. 

      Phonetic spelling

  • 18. 
    Which of the following are images of light and vision that are used to contrast with the blindness caused by his formal education?
    • A. 

      A slave/with vision ( l.10-11), Toussaint de beacon (L. 20)

    • B. 

      Toussaint de thorn/of the Haitian Revolution (l.20-21)

    • C. 

      Nanny/see far woman (l.26-27)

  • 19. 
    Which of the following historical figures are connected to imaged of vision, hope, liberty, nature and water?
    • A. 

      Nanny

    • B. 

      Toussaint

    • C. 

      Dick Whittington

    • D. 

      Lord Nelson

  • 20. 
    Which of the following are used by the speaker to separate humorous attacks on British historical and cultural figures from serious details about heroic Caribbean historical figures?
    • A. 

      Use of different stanza forms

    • B. 

      Use of juxtaposition

    • C. 

      Use of contrast

    • D. 

      Repetition of dem tell me

  • 21. 
    The British stanzas are all ______________. This regular form is used to mirror the restrictive nature of his British education, especially when it is contrasted with the free verse and song-like chants used in the Caribbean stanzas.
    • A. 

      Quatrains

    • B. 

      Free verse

    • C. 

      Iambic pentameter

    • D. 

      Enjabment

  • 22. 
    The Caribbean lines are presented in italics with short, sometimes one word lines. This forces the reader to think about the impact of these Caribbean historical figures and their stories. it also emphasises their value to history and suggests that they are worthy to be included in the British curriculum.
    • A. 

      True

    • B. 

      False

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