Multiple Choice Questions Quiz

42 Questions | Total Attempts: 46

SettingsSettingsSettings
Please wait...
Multiple Choice Quizzes & Trivia

Choose the best answer for each of the multiple choice questions.


Questions and Answers
  • 1. 
    The first ¢ower source of the Industri"l Revolution w"s ________________
    • A. 

      Foot pedals and running water.

    • B. 

      Steam engines.

    • C. 

      Electricity.

    • D. 

      Windmills.

  • 2. 
    Engl"nd not only held " ¡ono¢oly over ¢roducts th"t were in world de¡"nd "t the beginning of the Industri"l Revolution, but "lso " ¡ono¢oly on ____________
    • A. 

      International transportation. international transportation. international transportation. international transportation. international transportation. international transportation.

    • B. 

      The sources of raw materials.

    • C. 

      The skill necessary to make the machines that manufactured the products.

    • D. 

      All available labor.

  • 3. 
    Industry diffusing to Western Euro¢e involved, "s in Brit"in, the loc"tion"l criteri": co"lfields, w"ter co¡¡unic"tion, "nd ____________
    • A. 

      Iron ore.

    • B. 

      Markets.

    • C. 

      Labor.

    • D. 

      Ports.

  • 4. 
    Which of the four cl"ssific"tions of industry ¡ust loc"te where the resources "re found?
    • A. 

      Secondary

    • B. 

      Tertiary

    • C. 

      Primary

    • D. 

      Quaternary

  • 5. 
    The incre"se in ti¡e "nd cost with dist"nce is referred to "s ________________
    • A. 

      Production costs.

    • B. 

      Distribution costs.

    • C. 

      Friction of distance.

    • D. 

      Distance decay.

  • 6. 
    The zone of ¢rob"bility for " business is ¡"rked by:
    • A. 

      Low income and low cost.

    • B. 

      Low income and high cost.

    • C. 

      High income and low cost.

    • D. 

      High income and high cost.

  • 7. 
    When Alfred Weber ¢ublished his book Theory of the Loc"tion of Industries (1909), wh"t did he select "s the critic"l deter¡in"nt of region"l industri"l loc"tion?
    • A. 

      Availability of labor

    • B. 

      Nearby markets

    • C. 

      Costs of labor

    • D. 

      Transportation costs

  • 8. 
    If a substantial number of enterprises all develop in, or move to, the same area the factor is called _______________
    • A. 

      Cluster.

    • B. 

      Focus.

    • C. 

      Agglomeration.

    • D. 

      Intensity.

  • 9. 
    Hotelling's location analysis emphasized the role of _______________
    • A. 

      Locational interdependence.

    • B. 

      Raw materials.

    • C. 

      Labor.

    • D. 

      Markets.

  • 10. 
    Industrialization occurred along an axis from Northern France through North-Central Germany to Czech Republic and South Poland.  This axis correlates with ________ as a locational factor.
    • A. 

      population

    • B. 

      Coalfields

    • C. 

      Major ports

    • D. 

      The trend of the drainage system

  • 11. 
     In the United States, most interstate oil pipelines originate:
    • A. 

      In Pennsylvania.

    • B. 

      In New Mexico.

    • C. 

      Along the Gulf of Mexico in Texas and Louisiana.

    • D. 

      In the Appalachian Mountains.

  • 12. 
    Manufacturing in North America began in _____ as early as late colonial times.
    • A. 

      New York

    • B. 

      Boston

    • C. 

      Philadelphia

    • D. 

      New England

  • 13. 
    Raw materials play an important role in industrial location.  In the northeastern United States, what is the orientation of this industry?
    • A. 

      In the mountains where the iron ore is located

    • B. 

      in the interior for good rail connections

    • C. 

      Along major rivers for a water supply

    • D. 

      Along the coast to facilitate imports of iron ore

  • 14. 
    New York City, like other large urban centers with great ports, is called a break of bulk location because ____________
    • A. 

      Plentiful labor is available to unload massive cargo ships.

    • B. 

      Markets are readily available for shipped goods.

    • C. 

      Large dock warehouses are available where goods can be stored large dock warehouses are available where goods can be stored until sold

    • D. 

      Transported cargo can be transferred from one kind of carrier to another.

  • 15. 
    In which major world manufacturing country does industry not lie near sources of raw material?
    • A. 

      China

    • B. 

      Japan

    • C. 

      India

    • D. 

      The United States

  • 16. 
    Mass production of standardized goods using assembly line techniques is referred to as: ____________
    • A. 

      Fordist.

    • B. 

      Manufacturing.

    • C. 

      Global production.

    • D. 

      Mass production.

  • 17. 
    Fast, flexible production of small lots with outsourcing around the world is referred to as: ____________
    • A. 

      Fordist.

    • B. 

      Post-Fordist.

    • C. 

      Socialist.

    • D. 

      Colonial production.

  • 18. 
    The type of manufacturing that is more likely to be located in peripheral countries is ____________
    • A. 

      Technical design.

    • B. 

      Labor-intensive.

    • C. 

      Low-labor needs.

    • D. 

      High-tech.

  • 19. 
    Current amounts of goods and resources moving in the global system would be impossible without the invention of _____________
    • A. 

      Aircraft.

    • B. 

      Container systems.

    • C. 

      Bulk cargo ships.

    • D. 

      Railroads.

  • 20. 
    Which country is almost completely dependent upon imported oil/natural gas?
    • A. 

      Netherlands

    • B. 

      Russia

    • C. 

      United States

    • D. 

      Japan

  • 21. 
    Between 1940 and the early 1960s, China's industrial growth was aided by ______________
    • A. 

      Soviet planners.

    • B. 

      The location of raw materials.

    • C. 

      Improved transportation.

    • D. 

      The distribution of the work force.

  • 22. 
    Service industries are commonly referred to as _____ industries.
    • A. 

      Tertiary

    • B. 

      Secondary

    • C. 

      Quaternary

    • D. 

      Quinary

  • 23. 
    People working in the ___________ sector of economic activity tend to have high levels of specialized knowledge or technical skills.
    • A. 

      Quaternary

    • B. 

      Tertiary

    • C. 

      Secondary

    • D. 

      Primary

  • 24. 
    The most important locational factor for the service sector is _________________
    • A. 

      Energy.

    • B. 

      Transportation.

    • C. 

      Market.

    • D. 

      Labor.

  • 25. 
    Fayetteville, Arkansas has become a ________________ because of Wal-Mart.
    • A. 

      Break-of-bulk point

    • B. 

      Techno pole

    • C. 

      Growth pole

    • D. 

      The most polluted city in America

  • 26. 
    Technopoles, a collection of high-technology industries, can be found in a number of countries.  Which of the following is not a region containing one of these countries?
    • A. 

      Eastern Asia

    • B. 

      Africa

    • C. 

      Australia

    • D. 

      North America

  • 27. 
    High-technology corridors have sprung up in the global economic core.  The resulting collection of high-tech industries has been called a tehcnopole with the best known being California's “Silicon Valley.”  A similar concentration has appeared around the city of ______________ in the eastern United States.
    • A. 

      New York

    • B. 

      Philadelphia

    • C. 

      Richmond

    • D. 

      Boston

  • 28. 
    Technopoles tend to locate near ______________
    • A. 

      Raw materials.

    • B. 

      Cheap labor.

    • C. 

      Electricity supplies.

    • D. 

      Centers of research and development (major research universities).

  • 29. 
    A highly organized and specialized system for organizing industrial production and labor. Named after automobile producer Henry Ford, this type of production features assembly-line production of standardized components for mass consumption.
    • A. 

      Break-of-bulk point

    • B. 

      Technopole

    • C. 

      Fordist

    • D. 

      Distance decay

  • 30. 
    Places where two or more modes of transportation meet (including air, road, rail, barge, and ship).
    • A. 

      Intermodal connections

    • B. 

      Fordist

    • C. 

      Deglomeration

    • D. 

      Technopole

  • 31. 
    With reference to production, to outsource to a third party located outside of the country.
    • A. 

      Deindustrialization

    • B. 

      Offshore

    • C. 

      Deglomeration

    • D. 

      Sunbelt

  • 32. 
    The South and Southwest regions of the United States
    • A. 

      Technopole

    • B. 

      Fordist

    • C. 

      Sunbelt

    • D. 

      Outsourced

  • 33. 
    Centers or nodes of high-technology research and activity around which a high-technology corridor is sometimes established.
    • A. 

      Technopole

    • B. 

      Post-fordist

    • C. 

      Outsourced

    • D. 

      Offshore

  • 34. 
    The effects of distance on interaction, generally the greater the distance the less interaction.
    • A. 

      Distance decay

    • B. 

      Locational interdependence

    • C. 

      Offshore

    • D. 

      Post-fordist

  • 35. 
    Theory developed by economist Harold Hotelling that suggests competitors, in trying to maximize sales, will seek to constrain each other's territory as much as possible which will therefore lead them to locate adjacent to one another in the middle of their collective customer base
    • A. 

      Primary industrial regions

    • B. 

      Global division of labor

    • C. 

      Outsourced

    • D. 

      Locational interdependence

  • 36. 
    World economic system characterized by a more flexible set of production practices in which goods are not mass-produced; instead, production has been accelerated and dispersed around the globe by multinational companies that shift production, outsourcing it around the world and bringing places closer together in time and space than would have been imaginable at the beginning of the twentieth century
    • A. 

      Sunbelt

    • B. 

      Friction of distance

    • C. 

      Post-fordist

    • D. 

      Break-of-bulk point

  • 37. 
    With reference to production, to turn over in part or in total to a third party
    • A. 

      Outsourced

    • B. 

      Friction of distance

    • C. 

      Industrial revolution

    • D. 

      Variable costs

  • 38. 
    The term applied to the social and economic changes in agriculture, commerce and manufacturing that resulted from technological innovations and specialization in late-eighteenth-century Europe.
    • A. 

      Industrial revolution

    • B. 

      Agglomeration

    • C. 

      Offshore

    • D. 

      Fordist

  • 39. 
    Costs that change directly with the amount of production (e.g. energy supply and labor costs).
    • A. 

      Industrial revolution

    • B. 

      Agglomeration

    • C. 

      Outsourced

    • D. 

      Variable costs

  • 40. 
    A process involving the clustering or concentrating of people or activities. The term often refers to manufacturing plants and businesses that benefit from close proximity because they share skilled-labor pools and technological and financial amenities.
    • A. 

      Agglomeration

    • B. 

      Deglomeration

    • C. 

      Intermodal

    • D. 

      Post-fordist

  • 41. 
    Describe the American Manufacturing Belt.  When and how did this region develop? What impact has post-Fordism and deindustrialization had on this region?
  • 42. 
    The tertiary sector of economic activity is often broken down into three categories. Identify the categories.  How is this tied to deindustrialization?  What was the relation between the rise of these tertiary activities and the explosion of high-technology usages in the past couple of decades?