Bio 130 Forensic Science Test

62 Questions | Total Attempts: 3409

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Bio 130 Forensic Science Test

The major concern when performing forensic study is to establish a cause of a certain problem. This study involves travelling to the scene of the crime to collect the evidence or occupy a laboratory role of performing analysis on objects brought by other individuals. Bio 130 Forensic Science Test gives a clear understanding of this. Check it out.


Questions and Answers
  • 1. 
    The term 'forensic' means:
    • A. 

      Related to public or legal matters

    • B. 

      Related to public or scientific matters

  • 2. 
    Which of the following is not a characteristic of a reliable scientific method?
    • A. 

      Formulate hypothesis

    • B. 

      Unquestioning authority of scientific laws

    • C. 

      Make observations

  • 3. 
    • A. 

      Evidence

    • B. 

      Testimony

    • C. 

      Hearsay

  • 4. 
    True or false: Forensic scientists do not need to know anything about the rules of law since that is an area reserved only for students of the law (attorneys, judges, congress, etc.). Attorneys that require an expert witness will tell the expert everything he/she needs to know about the rules of law and what to say in court.
    • A. 

      True

    • B. 

      False

  • 5. 
    • A. 

      Attorney

    • B. 

      Supreme court.

    • C. 

      The judge.

    • D. 

      District attorney

  • 6. 
    What word did the ancient Greeks use to indicate the proper harmony of feeling and intelligence?
    • A. 

      Reason

    • B. 

      Politics

    • C. 

      Science

    • D. 

      Coincidence

  • 7. 
    The fundamental purpose of the criminal justice system is:
    • A. 

      Punish the convicted.

    • B. 

      Prove the innocent till guilty

    • C. 

      Blah

    • D. 

      To protect the rights of the accused

  • 8. 
    In the real world of forensic science,
    • A. 

      individual scientists always work as members of a larger team which includes other scientists and members of the legal profession/law enforcement

    • B. 

      The number 10.

  • 9. 
    Forensic scientists are obligated to combine scientific skills with a sworn duty to the public good. Therefore, forensic science is often called:
    • A. 

      Law science

    • B. 

      Forensics

    • C. 

      Public science

  • 10. 
    True or false: Forensic scientists typically must present their conclusions as tentative, conditional, or probable in nature.
    • A. 

      True

    • B. 

      False

  • 11. 
    True or false: Because scientific opinions involve interpretations of and inferences from scientific data they are not subject to challenge in court.
    • A. 

      True

    • B. 

      False

  • 12. 
    True or false: A criminal trial is simply a mechanism to secure a conviction against a suspect.
    • A. 

      True

    • B. 

      False

  • 13. 
    The primary duty of a forensic expert in a court of law is:
    • A. 

      Explain scientific procedures.

    • B. 

      Explain scientific evidence.

    • C. 

      Give testimony.

    • D. 

      To tell the truth

  • 14. 
    Courts may require forensic scientists to provide a measurement of a reasoned opinion.  This measurement of a conclusion drawn from scientific data is called the:
    • A. 

      Percent error

    • B. 

      Degree of scientific certainty

    • C. 

      Approximate percentile.

  • 15. 
    A forensic scientist acting as an expert witness must always remember to discuss only those areas within his/her expertise and must not offer opinions about things outside of that expertise.
    • A. 

      True

    • B. 

      False

  • 16. 
    True or false: The primary role of the prosecuting attorney is to determine the winnability of a case before making the decision to prosecute.
    • A. 

      True

    • B. 

      False

  • 17. 
    Obligations to professional codes of ethics and contractual obligations to employers can create conflicts with the legal obligations of a forensic scientist.
    • A. 

      True

    • B. 

      False

  • 18. 
    Forensic scientists differ from other scientists in that:
    • A. 

      They use forensics.

    • B. 

      They use specialized lab equipment.

    • C. 

      They have legal obligations to which they must conform their conduct

  • 19. 
    A sequence of events that, although accidental, seems to be planned or arranged is called:
    • A. 

      Coincidence

    • B. 

      Planned

    • C. 

      Dumb luck

  • 20. 
    True or false: Exclusion of class or individual forensic findings is important because it can help to eliminate a potential suspect from further investigation and prosecution.
    • A. 

      True

    • B. 

      False

  • 21. 
    Facts or opinions generated or supported by the use of one or more of the forensic sciences is called:
    • A. 

      Evidence

    • B. 

      Forensic evidence

    • C. 

      Application of forensic science

    • D. 

      Generation

  • 22. 
    Evidence that associates a particular person with a crime scene or the commission of a crime is called:
    • A. 

      Direct evidence

    • B. 

      Circumstantial evidence

    • C. 

      Individual characteristic evidence

    • D. 

      Testimony

  • 23. 
    Court-approved information that the jury is allowed to consider when determining a defendant's guilt or innocence is called
    • A. 

      Evidence

    • B. 

      Forensic evidence

    • C. 

      Testimony

    • D. 

      Ballistics

  • 24. 
    True or false: Most forensic evidence is presented in court as being an absolute match to a given suspect or other individual.
    • A. 

      True

    • B. 

      False

  • 25. 
    The primary purpose of forensic evidence in a criminal trial is to:
    • A. 

      Figure out what happened.

    • B. 

      To physically link the defendant to the crime scene, thereby providing inferential evidence of his/her commission or association with the crime

    • C. 

      Match the evidence to the suspect or victim.