Classification And Treatment Of Asthma Quiz

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Classification And Treatment Of Asthma Quiz - Quiz

Enhance your understanding of asthma with our comprehensive Classification and Treatment of Asthma Quiz. Delve into the intricacies of asthma classifications, symptoms, and cutting-edge treatments. Test your knowledge on inhalers, medications, and the latest therapeutic approaches. Ideal for healthcare professionals, students, and anyone seeking in-depth insights into asthma management. From mild to severe cases, our quiz covers the spectrum of asthma classifications, providing a valuable educational experience. Stay informed about advancements in asthma care and refine your expertise with our quiz. Strengthen your grasp on asthma classification and treatment—take the quiz and empower yourself with valuable healthcare knowledge.


Questions and Answers
  • 1. 

    Fluticasone, budesonide, triamcinolone are examples of what type of drug?

    • A.

      LABA

    • B.

      Oral Corticosteroids

    • C.

      Immunomodulators

    • D.

      Inhaled Corticosteroids

    • E.

      SABA

    Correct Answer
    D. Inhaled Corticosteroids
    Explanation
    LABA:
    Oral Corticosteroids: Predinsone
    Immunomodulators:
    SABA: alBUTEROL, levALBUTEROL, PirBUTEROL

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  • 2. 

    33 y/o male with a history of asthma says he uses his inhaler about 2 times a week,  wakes up “almost once a week, but not quite” coughing, takes a whiff from his inhaler and is able to go back to sleep. He has a normal FEV1/FVC ratio. How would you classify his asthma?

    • A.

      Intermittent

    • B.

      Mild persistent

    • C.

      Moderate persistent

    • D.

      Severe persistent

    Correct Answer
    B. Mild persistent
    Explanation
    In a mild persistent case...Symptoms > 2 days/week (not daily), Nighttime awakenings occur 3-4x/month, they use SABA Albuterol inhalers > 2days/week (not daily). Interference with activity is Minor. The FEV1 > 80%, and FEV1/FVC > normal. Exacerbations > 2 in a year

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  • 3. 

    16 y/o male has episodic wheezing, and dyspnea. His mother tells you that  he wakes up about twice a week coughing.  He is unable to keep up with the rest of the kids on the baseball team because of shortness of breath.  You perform a PFT,  and find out the FEV1 is 77%. How would you classify his asthma?

    • A.

      Intermittent

    • B.

      Mild Persistent

    • C.

      Moderate Persistent

    • D.

      Severe Persistent

    Correct Answer
    C. Moderate Persistent
    Explanation
    Based on the information provided, the patient experiences episodic wheezing and dyspnea, wakes up coughing twice a week, and has difficulty keeping up with physical activities due to shortness of breath. The FEV1 value of 77% indicates moderate impairment of lung function. These symptoms and lung function results suggest that the patient's asthma is classified as moderate persistent.

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  • 4. 

    24 year old female presents with shortness of breath,  wheezing,  flaring of nostrils. Says she has these symptoms once every couple of weeks, on a rare occasion she will wake up in the middle of the night with these symptoms. Measured forced expiratory Volume is 82%. How would you classify this patients asthma?

    • A.

      Intermittent

    • B.

      Mild Persistent

    • C.

      Moderate Persistent

    • D.

      Severe Persistent

    Correct Answer
    A. Intermittent
    Explanation
    Based on the given information, the patient experiences symptoms of shortness of breath, wheezing, and flaring of nostrils once every couple of weeks, with occasional nighttime symptoms. The measured forced expiratory volume is 82%. According to the Global Initiative for Asthma (GINA) guidelines, this pattern of symptoms and lung function measurement falls under the classification of intermittent asthma. Intermittent asthma is characterized by symptoms occurring less than twice a week, nighttime symptoms less than twice a month, and normal lung function between episodes.

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  • 5. 

    What is the most appropriate prescription for a patient who has intermittent asthma?

    • A.

      Fluticasone

    • B.

      Salmeterol

    • C.

      Albuterol

    • D.

      Triamcinolone

    • E.

      Omalizumab

    Correct Answer
    C. Albuterol
    Explanation
    For a patient with intermittent asthma, the most appropriate treatment would be a short acting beta agonist, such as alBUTEROL.

    Fluticasone, Budesonide (not listed), and triacinolone are inhaled corticosteroids (ICS) and are given for patients with mild -severe persistent asthma (dose increases with severity)

    Salmeterol is a Long Acting Beta Agonist which is combined with an ICS to treat moderate persistent asthma

    Omalizumab is an immunomodulator and should be considered in cases of severe persistent asthma

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  • 6. 

    What is the most appropriate prescription(s) for a patient that has moderate persistent asthma?

    • A.

      Fluticasone

    • B.

      Albuterol

    • C.

      Omalizumab

    • D.

      Salmeterol

    Correct Answer(s)
    A. Fluticasone
    D. Salmeterol
    Explanation
    There are three options for moderate persistent asthma: low dose ICS +LABA, medium dose ICS, or Medium dose ICS +LABA. LABAs include Salmeterol, ICSs include Fluticasone, Budesonide, and triacinolone

    Albuterol is a short acting beta agonist that is used for patients with intermittent asthma
    Omalizumab is an immunomodulator and should be considered in cases of severe persistent asthma

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  • 7. 

    What is the best prescription(s) for a patient who has severe persistent asthma

    • A.

      Albuterol

    • B.

      Salmeterol

    • C.

      Omalizumab

    • D.

      Predinsone for 2 weeks

    • E.

      Predinsone for 5 days

    • F.

      Fluticasone

    Correct Answer(s)
    B. Salmeterol
    C. Omalizumab
    E. Predinsone for 5 days
    F. Fluticasone
    Explanation
    For patients with severe persistent asthma: High dose ICS + LABA + (oral corticosteroid if severe enough), Consider omalizumab

    For intermittent: SABA (albuterol)
    For mild persistent: Low Dose ICS
    For Moderate: ICS + LABA or medium ICS,

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