Trivia Questions Quiz: How Well Do You Know About African Diaspora?

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Trivia Questions Quiz: How Well Do You Know About African Diaspora? - Quiz

How Well Do You Know About African Diaspora? This term is used to explain the period where Africans were taken from their motherland to other continents as slaves. What do you know about this mass forceful migration of people and where they settled? Do take the quiz and get to find out what more you may learn. All the best!


Questions and Answers
  • 1. 

    What was the image of African used as Savage used for?

    Explanation
    The image of Africans as savages was used to conceal the brutal exploitation of Africa by Europeans for their own economic gain, specifically for the extraction of gold and the enslavement of Africans. By portraying Africans as uncivilized and inferior, Europeans justified their actions and perpetuated the myth that they were bringing civilization to a supposedly backward continent. This allowed them to continue their exploitative practices without facing scrutiny or opposition.

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  • 2. 

    How were slaves gained in Africa?

    Explanation
    African leaders played a significant role in the slave trade by willingly supplying slaves to European merchants. Their involvement was driven by ambition, greed, and jealousy, which motivated them to enter into deals with the Europeans. This collaboration allowed the slave trade to flourish, as African leaders saw it as an opportunity to gain wealth and power.

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  • 3. 

    The Middle Passage was the trip on a ship from Africa to where? 

    Explanation
    The Middle Passage was the journey on a ship from Africa to the Americas, which includes South, Central, and North America.

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  • 4. 

    How long did trips in the Middle passage take and what were the conditions?

    Explanation
    Trips in the Middle Passage typically lasted for two weeks to five months. Regardless of the duration, these journeys always ended in sickness, disease, and a 50% death rate.

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  • 5. 

    In result of the many slave revolts, Runaways, and rebellions, how were the slaves punished?

    Explanation
    The slaves were punished through a combination of methods, including jailing, beating, mutilation, and death. These punishments were a response to the various forms of resistance displayed by the slaves, such as revolts, runaways, and rebellions. The severity of the punishments highlights the brutal and oppressive nature of the slave system, aiming to instill fear and maintain control over the enslaved population.

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  • 6. 

    What did Some revolts in the Caribbean result in?

    Explanation
    Some revolts in the Caribbean resulted in the formation of free communities in the jungle or in the mountains with thousands of former slaves. These revolts were often led by enslaved individuals who sought freedom and autonomy from their oppressors. By establishing these communities in remote and inaccessible areas, they were able to create a space where they could live freely and govern themselves. These communities provided a sense of independence and empowerment for the former slaves, allowing them to build their own societies and live according to their own rules and customs.

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  • 7. 

    What became the basis of slavery in America?

    Explanation
    In America, the basis of slavery was primarily determined by a person's color. The institution of slavery was deeply rooted in racial discrimination, with Africans and African Americans being enslaved based on the color of their skin. This discriminatory practice was justified by the belief in the superiority of white people and the dehumanization of Black individuals. Slavery was enforced through laws and social norms that perpetuated the notion that people of color were inferior and could be owned as property.

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  • 8. 

    How much was the importation of slaves in the 18th century?

    Explanation
    The importation of slaves in the 18th century was estimated to be around 60,000. This number represents the total number of slaves that were brought into various regions during that time period. It is important to note that this figure is an approximation and the actual number may vary. The importation of slaves during this era played a significant role in the transatlantic slave trade and had a profound impact on the history and development of many countries.

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  • 9. 

    Poorly fed and overworked slaves were prey to what? 

    Explanation
    Poorly fed and overworked slaves were susceptible to a range of diseases including typhus, typhoid, tuberculosis, dysentery, and various intestinal disorders. These diseases were prevalent in unsanitary and overcrowded conditions, which were often the living conditions for slaves. The lack of proper nutrition and excessive physical labor weakened their immune systems, making them more vulnerable to these illnesses.

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  • 10. 

    Why did Europeans defeat slavery?

    Explanation
    The Europeans defeated slavery to save slaves from idolatry, paganism, and superstition. This suggests that the Europeans believed that by ending slavery, they could rescue slaves from practices and beliefs that were considered undesirable or harmful. It implies that the Europeans saw themselves as superior and wanted to "civilize" the slaves by converting them to their own religious and cultural beliefs. This explanation aligns with the historical context of European colonialism and missionary efforts during the time when slavery was being abolished.

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  • 11. 

    What country had the most slavery what evidence proves it?

    Explanation
    Brazil had the most slavery based on the evidence of African influence in its religion, music, mores, language folklore, and social structure. This suggests that the African culture had a significant impact on various aspects of Brazilian society, indicating a history of slavery and the presence of a large enslaved African population in the country.

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  • 12. 

    What religion did slaves turn to finding no freedom or liberation?

    Explanation
    During the time of slavery, Christianity was a religion that many slaves turned to in search of freedom and liberation. Slaves found solace in the teachings of Christianity, which emphasized equality, love, and the promise of an afterlife free from suffering. They interpreted the biblical stories of liberation, such as the Exodus, as a source of hope and inspiration. Christianity provided a sense of community and strength, allowing slaves to endure the hardships of their lives while holding onto the belief that they would find freedom and liberation in the eyes of God.

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  • 13. 

    How many blacks fought in the civil war?

    Explanation
    During the Civil War, more than 200,000 blacks fought. This answer indicates that the number of black soldiers who participated in the war was greater than 200,000, or at least 200,000 or more. It highlights the significant contribution and involvement of black individuals in the conflict, demonstrating their active participation in the war effort.

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  • 14. 

    What are four ways Blacks fought every aspect of slavery?

    Explanation
    The answer is incorrect. The correct answer is "Sabotaged work, destroyed tools, disabled animals, and slowed down". This answer accurately describes four ways in which Blacks fought against slavery. They would sabotage their work by intentionally doing it poorly or causing disruptions, destroy tools to make it more difficult for slave owners to control them, disable animals to hinder their productivity, and deliberately slow down their work pace to resist the demands of their oppressors. The additional options of "acted stupid" and "entertained themselves" are not accurate ways in which Blacks fought against slavery.

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  • 15. 

    Name 4 things that whites called slaves?

    Explanation
    The answer is "disobedient, head strong, idle, incompetent". This is because the question asks for 4 things that whites called slaves, and this answer provides a list of four adjectives that were commonly used to describe slaves by white people during the time of slavery.

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  • 16. 

    What did Europeans do to fill the desire of slavery?

    Explanation
    Europeans filled the desire for slavery by engineering fights between tribes. This means that they manipulated and instigated conflicts between different tribes or groups of people, in order to create a chaotic and violent environment. By doing so, they were able to capture and enslave individuals from these tribes, exploiting the resulting chaos to fulfill their desire for slave labor. This practice was a way for Europeans to maintain control and profit from the slave trade.

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  • 17. 

    The  first of the West African Empires to rise to a population of wealth, power, and prominence.

    Explanation
    Ghana was the first of the West African Empires to rise to a population of wealth, power, and prominence. The empire of Ghana emerged around the 6th century and reached its peak during the 9th to 11th centuries. Ghana was known for its vast gold resources, which contributed to its wealth and power. The empire controlled important trade routes, allowing it to establish strong economic and political influence in the region. Ghana's prominence attracted traders from North Africa and Europe, further enhancing its prosperity. Overall, Ghana's early rise to wealth, power, and prominence set the stage for the subsequent West African Empires.

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  • 18. 

    What was the ruler of Ghana called?

    Explanation
    The ruler of Ghana was called "The Master of gold" because Ghana was known for its abundant gold resources. The ruler had control over the gold trade and was considered the master or leader in this field. The title of "The Master of gold" symbolized the ruler's power, wealth, and influence in the region.

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  • 19. 

    Where did Ghana's wealth come from? 

    Explanation
    Ghana's wealth came from its trade in gold. The country was historically known for its abundant gold resources, which were highly sought after by traders and merchants. The trade in gold allowed Ghana to accumulate wealth and establish itself as a prosperous nation. The gold trade also contributed to the growth of Ghana's economy and influenced its cultural and political development.

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  • 20. 

    What was the name of the Capital of Ghana and how would people travel there?

    Explanation
    The capital of Ghana was called Kumbi, and people would travel there by using caravans of hundreds of camels that would transport merchants across the hazardous Sahara Desert. This method of transportation was commonly used to navigate the vast and challenging terrain of the desert.

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  • 21. 

    What century was it when Ghana was the first place to have a strong empire with a record that was written?

    Explanation
    In the 11th century, Ghana became the first place to have a strong empire with a written record. This means that during this time, Ghana had a well-established and powerful empire that kept written records of its history, culture, and achievements. This is significant because it indicates a level of sophistication and organization within the Ghanaian society, as writing and record-keeping are often associated with advanced civilizations.

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  • 22. 

    What were they trading at the Kumbi market of Ghana?

    Explanation
    name 5 things that were traded

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  • 23. 

    Maintained a stable of 1,000 horses. Each slept on the carpet, had a silken rope around his head and foot, and three servants took care for its needs. What was the name of this king? what century did he rise to power?

  • 24. 

    A powerful prince from 961-971 in Ghana commanded a fighting force of 100,000 camels and it took 2 full months to travel across his kingdom. who was he?

    Explanation
    Ten Yerotan was a powerful prince in Ghana from 961-971. He commanded a fighting force of 100,000 camels, indicating his military strength and influence. The fact that it took 2 full months to travel across his kingdom suggests that his kingdom was vast and expansive.

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  • 25. 

    The fame and glory and wealth of Ghana spread as far as..(blank) and (blank) 

    Explanation
    The fame and glory and wealth of Ghana spread as far as Cairo and Baghdad. This suggests that the influence and reputation of Ghana extended to these two major cities, indicating that Ghana was a significant and prosperous civilization. Cairo and Baghdad were both important centers of trade, culture, and power during the time of Ghana's prominence, so the association with these cities further emphasizes the greatness of Ghana.

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  • 26. 

    Kumbi consisted of twin cities about six miles apart, one was ........... and the other was called .............. or the grove, where local priests performed sacred rights of the traditional religion of the empire.

    Explanation
    The correct answer is "Muslim, El-Ghaba, Muslim and El-Ghaba". This suggests that one of the twin cities was called "Muslim" and the other was called "El-Ghaba". The phrase "Muslim and El-Ghaba" is repeated to emphasize that both cities had these names.

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  • 27. 

    What contributed to the decline of Ghana?

    Explanation
    The decline of Ghana can be attributed to a combination of raids and natural disasters. The raids, conducted by neighboring kingdoms and nomadic groups, weakened Ghana's military and economy. These attacks disrupted trade routes, leading to a decline in revenue and economic instability. Additionally, natural disasters such as droughts and floods further exacerbated the situation by causing food shortages and destroying crops. The combination of these factors ultimately led to the downfall of the Ghanaian empire.

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  • 28. 

    Ghana was hated by a Muslim group called .................... because of its wealth and its traditional religion.

    Explanation
    The Almoravids, a Muslim group, held hatred towards Ghana due to its wealth and traditional religion.

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  • 29. 

    What year was Ghana defeated by King Soso?

  • 30. 

    What two countries did King Soso defeat in 1203 putting to death 11 of 12 airs to the throne in one of them?

    Explanation
    King Soso defeated Ghana and Mali in 1203, and as a result, he put to death 11 of the 12 heirs to the throne in one of these countries. This suggests that King Soso was a powerful ruler who successfully conquered both Ghana and Mali, eliminating potential rivals to his own throne in the process.

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  • 31. 

    Scholars from North Africa and Europe exchanged visits with scholars from where?

  • 32. 

    At the University of Sankore in Timbuctoo operations were performed there for the removal of cataracts from the eyes in what years?

    Explanation
    The University of Sankore in Timbuctoo performed operations for the removal of cataracts from the eyes in the 1490's A.D.

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  • 33. 

    Arab historians report that operations to remove cataracts were not attempted in Europe until when?

    Explanation
    According to Arab historians, operations to remove cataracts were not attempted in Europe until 200 years later than in Africa. This suggests that the medical practice of cataract surgery was more advanced and developed in Africa compared to Europe during that time period. It implies that Europe lagged behind Africa in terms of medical advancements and techniques for cataract treatment.

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  • 34. 

    Under Askia I, the Songhi Empire...

    Explanation
    During the reign of Askia I, the Songhai Empire expanded its territory significantly, reaching a size comparable to that of Europe. This expansion was achieved through military conquests and successful campaigns, which allowed the empire to gain control over vast areas and incorporate numerous regions into its domain. The empire's territorial growth under Askia I's leadership was a testament to the strength and power of the Songhai Empire during this period.

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  • 35. 

    The Songhi Empire conquered ........ and ......... by the 16th century.

    Explanation
    The Songhai Empire was a powerful West African empire that expanded its territory by conquering Ghana and Mali by the 16th century. These two kingdoms were significant in the region and had established their dominance in trade and wealth. The Songhai Empire's conquest of Ghana and Mali allowed them to control important trade routes and resources, further strengthening their own empire.

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  • 36. 

    The major city of the Songhi kingdom and.................. came to power in ........

    Explanation
    Askia the Great came to power in 1493 A.D. He was the ruler of the Songhai kingdom and the major city of the kingdom was not mentioned in the question.

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  • 37. 

    In the carribean, blacks out numbered whites by _______ in _______(Year)

    Explanation
    During the year 1800, the population in the Caribbean consisted of a significantly higher number of black individuals compared to white individuals, with a proportion of 91% of the population being black. This suggests that the black population in the Caribbean was the majority during that time period.

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